George II of Great Britain

George IIKing George IIPrince of WalesGeorgeGeorge II AugustusKingKing George II of Great Britainthe KingKing GeorgeGeorge, Prince of Wales
George II (George Augustus; Georg II. August; 30 October / 9 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and a prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 (O.S.) until his death in 1760.wikipedia
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Frederick, Prince of Wales

FrederickPrince of WalesPrince Frederick
He had a difficult relationship with his eldest son, Frederick, who supported the parliamentary opposition.
He was the eldest but estranged son of King George II and Caroline of Ansbach, and the father of King George III.

Sophia Dorothea of Celle

Sophia Dorothea of Brunswick-Lüneburg-CelleSophie DorotheaDuchess Sophia Dorothea of Brunswick-Celle
George was born in the city of Hanover in Germany, and was the son of George Louis, Hereditary Prince of Brunswick-Lüneburg (later King George I of Great Britain), and his wife, Sophia Dorothea of Celle.
Sophia Dorothea of Celle (15 September 1666 – 13 November 1726) was the repudiated wife of future King George I of Great Britain, and mother of George II.

Sophia Dorothea of Hanover

Sophia DorotheaQueen of PrussiaPrincess Sophia Dorothea of Hanover
His sister, Sophia Dorothea, was born when he was three years old.
She was the sister of George II, King of Great Britain and the mother of Frederick II, King of Prussia.

Duchy of Brunswick-Lüneburg

BrunswickBrunswick-LüneburgDuke of Brunswick-Lüneburg
George II (George Augustus; Georg II. August; 30 October / 9 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and a prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 (O.S.) until his death in 1760.
George I was followed by his son George II and great-grandson George III.

George I of Great Britain

George IKing George IKing George
George was born in the city of Hanover in Germany, and was the son of George Louis, Hereditary Prince of Brunswick-Lüneburg (later King George I of Great Britain), and his wife, Sophia Dorothea of Celle. After the deaths of Sophia and Anne, Queen of Great Britain, in 1714, his father George I, Elector of Hanover, inherited the British throne.
In 1683, George and his brother, Frederick Augustus, served in the Great Turkish War at the Battle of Vienna, and Sophia Dorothea bore George a son, George Augustus.

Caroline of Ansbach

Queen CarolineCarolinePrincess of Wales
In June 1705, under the false name of "Monsieur de Busch", George visited the Ansbach court at their summer residence in Triesdorf to investigate incognito a marriage prospect: Caroline of Ansbach, the former ward of his aunt Queen Sophia Charlotte of Prussia.
Caroline of Brandenburg-Ansbach (Wilhelmina Charlotte Caroline; 1 March 1683 – 20 November 1737 ) was Queen of Great Britain as the wife of King George II.

Battle of Dettingen

DettingenBattles of DettingenDettigen
During the War of the Austrian Succession, George participated at the Battle of Dettingen in 1743, and thus became the last British monarch to lead an army in battle.
George II commanded his troops in the battle, and this marked the last time a British monarch personally led his troops on the field.

Kingdom of Great Britain

Great BritainBritishBritain
England and Scotland united in 1707 to form the Kingdom of Great Britain, and jointly accepted the succession as laid down by the English Act of Settlement.
| leader3 = George II

War of the Austrian Succession

Austrian SuccessionAustrianAustrian Successions
During the War of the Austrian Succession, George participated at the Battle of Dettingen in 1743, and thus became the last British monarch to lead an army in battle.
Now an Anglo-Allied army commanded by King George II retreated down the Main River to the village of Hanau.

Parliament of Great Britain

ParliamentBritish ParliamentGreat Britain
As king from 1727, George exercised little control over British domestic policy, which was largely controlled by the Parliament of Great Britain.
George I's successor, his son George II, continued to follow through with his father's domestic policies and made little effort to re-establish monarchical control over the government which was now in firm control by Parliament.

Ahlden House

She was confined to Ahlden House and denied access to her two children, who probably never saw their mother again.
It is principally known as the place of imprisonment of Sophia Dorothea of Celle, otherwise Sophie Dorothea of Brunswick-Lüneburg, wife of George I of Great Britain and the mother of George II of Great Britain.

Princess Amelia of Great Britain

Princess AmeliaAmelia Amelia
Between 1709 and 1713, George and Caroline had three more children, all girls: Anne, Amelia, and Caroline.
Princess Amelia of Great Britain (Amelia Sophia Eleanor; 10 June 1711 (New Style) – 31 October 1786) was the second daughter of King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline.

Princess Caroline of Great Britain

CarolinePrincess CarolineCaroline Elizabeth
Between 1709 and 1713, George and Caroline had three more children, all girls: Anne, Amelia, and Caroline.
Princess Caroline of Great Britain (Caroline Elizabeth; 10 June 1713 – 28 December 1757) was the fourth child and third daughter of King George II of Great Britain and his wife Caroline of Ansbach.

List of British monarchs

MonarchMonarchsKing
George II (George Augustus; Georg II. August; 30 October / 9 November 1683 – 25 October 1760) was King of Great Britain and Ireland, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg (Hanover) and a prince-elector of the Holy Roman Empire from 11 June 1727 (O.S.) until his death in 1760.
| George II

Duke of Cambridge

CambridgeDukeDukedom of Cambridge
He was naturalized as an English subject in 1705 by the Sophia Naturalization Act, and in 1706, he was made a Knight of the Garter and created Duke and Marquess of Cambridge, Earl of Milford Haven, Viscount Northallerton, and Baron Tewkesbury in the Peerage of England.
The title was recreated in 1706 and granted to George Augustus, son of the Elector of Hanover (later King George I).

Hampton Court Palace

Hampton CourtChapel Royalthe Chapel Royal, Hampton Court
Spectators were allowed to see him dine in public at Hampton Court Palace.
King George II was the last monarch to reside in the palace.

Herrenhausen Gardens

HerrenhausenHerrenhäuser Gärten, HanoverBerggarten
On 22 August / 2 September 1705 Caroline arrived in Hanover for her wedding, which was held the same evening in the chapel at Herrenhausen.
The next king, George II, planned again for a new palace in better proportion with the Great Garden, but never realized it. His successor George III, who never visited Herrenhausen, had the palace modernized in neoclassical style by G. F. Laves.

Prince George William of Great Britain

Prince George WilliamGeorge WilliamPrince George William of Wales
The birth in 1717 of George's second son, Prince George William, proved to be a catalyst for a family quarrel; the king, supposedly following custom, appointed the Lord Chamberlain, the Duke of Newcastle, as one of the baptismal sponsors of the child.
Prince George William of Great Britain (13 November 1717 – 17 February 1718) was an infant member of the British royal family, second son of King George II and Caroline of Ansbach who, at the time of his birth, were the Prince and Princess of Wales.

Princess Mary of Great Britain

MaryMary of Great BritainPrincess Mary
They had three more children: William, Mary, and Louisa, who were brought up at Leicester House and Richmond Lodge, George's summer residence.
Princess Mary of Great Britain (5 March 1723 – 14 January 1772) was the second-youngest daughter of King George II of Great Britain and his wife Caroline of Ansbach, and Landgravine of Hesse-Kassel as the wife of Landgrave Frederick II.

Order of the Garter

KGKnight of the GarterGarter
He was naturalized as an English subject in 1705 by the Sophia Naturalization Act, and in 1706, he was made a Knight of the Garter and created Duke and Marquess of Cambridge, Earl of Milford Haven, Viscount Northallerton, and Baron Tewkesbury in the Peerage of England.
He created the statute of supernumerary members in 1805 so that any descendant of King George II could be installed as such a member.

Charles Edward Stuart

Bonnie Prince CharlieYoung PretenderCharles Stuart
In 1745, supporters of the Catholic claimant to the British throne, James Francis Edward Stuart ("The Old Pretender"), led by James's son Charles Edward Stuart ("The Young Pretender" or "Bonnie Prince Charlie"), attempted and failed to depose George in the last of the Jacobite rebellions.
The Jacobites marched north once more, winning the Battle of Falkirk Muir, but were later pursued by King George II's son, the Duke of Cumberland, who caught up with them at the Battle of Culloden on 16 April 1746.

Louise of Great Britain

LouiseQueen LouisePrincess Louisa
They had three more children: William, Mary, and Louisa, who were brought up at Leicester House and Richmond Lodge, George's summer residence.
She was the youngest surviving daughter of King George II of Great Britain and Caroline of Ansbach.

George Frideric Handel

HandelHändelHaendel
The composer George Frideric Handel was commissioned to write four new anthems for the coronation, including Zadok the Priest.
One of his four coronation anthems, Zadok the Priest (1727), composed for the coronation of George II, has been performed at every subsequent British coronation, traditionally during the sovereign's anointing.

Richmond, London

RichmondRichmond, SurreyRichmond upon Thames
They had three more children: William, Mary, and Louisa, who were brought up at Leicester House and Richmond Lodge, George's summer residence.
White Lodge, in the middle of what is now Richmond Park, was built as a hunting lodge for George II and during this period the number of large houses in their own grounds – such as Asgill House and Pembroke Lodge – increased significantly.

Zadok the Priest

A textCoronation AnthemZadok the Priest'' (HWV 258)
The composer George Frideric Handel was commissioned to write four new anthems for the coronation, including Zadok the Priest.
Zadok the Priest (HWV 258) is a British anthem which was composed by George Frideric Handel for the coronation of King George II in 1727.