George IV of the United Kingdom

George IVKing George IVPrince RegentPrince of WalesGeorgeGeorge, Prince of WalesThe Prince RegentGeorge, Prince RegentThe Prince of WalesPrince George
George IV (George Augustus Frederick; 12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and king of Hanover following the death of his father, King George III, on 29 January 1820, until his own death ten years later.wikipedia
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St James's Palace

St. James's PalaceSt James’s PalaceSt James
George was born at St James's Palace, London, on 12 August 1762, the first child of the British king George III and Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. In 1795, the prince acquiesced; and they were married on 8 April 1795 at the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace.

Earl of Chester

Earls of ChesterEarldom of ChesterChester
As the eldest son of a British sovereign, he automatically became Duke of Cornwall and Duke of Rothesay at birth; he was created Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester a few days later.

Thomas Secker

Archbishop SeckerArchbishop of CanterburyBishop of Oxford
On 18 September of the same year, he was baptised by Thomas Secker, Archbishop of Canterbury.

Archbishop of Canterbury

Archbishops of CanterburyCanterburysee of Canterbury
On 18 September of the same year, he was baptised by Thomas Secker, Archbishop of Canterbury.

Adolphus Frederick IV, Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz

Adolphus Frederick IVAdolf Friedrich IVDuke Adolf Friedrich IV
His godparents were: his uncle Adolphus Frederick IV, Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (for whom the Lord Chamberlain, William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire, stood proxy); his paternal great-uncle Prince William, Duke of Cumberland; and his grandmother, the Dowager Princess of Wales.

Lord Chamberlain

Lord Chamberlain of the HouseholdKing's Chamberlainchamberlain
His godparents were: his uncle Adolphus Frederick IV, Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (for whom the Lord Chamberlain, William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire, stood proxy); his paternal great-uncle Prince William, Duke of Cumberland; and his grandmother, the Dowager Princess of Wales.

William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire

The Duke of DevonshireDuke of DevonshireMarquess of Hartington
His godparents were: his uncle Adolphus Frederick IV, Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (for whom the Lord Chamberlain, William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire, stood proxy); his paternal great-uncle Prince William, Duke of Cumberland; and his grandmother, the Dowager Princess of Wales.

Prince William, Duke of Cumberland

Duke of CumberlandPrince William Augustus, Duke of CumberlandCumberland
His godparents were: his uncle Adolphus Frederick IV, Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (for whom the Lord Chamberlain, William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire, stood proxy); his paternal great-uncle Prince William, Duke of Cumberland; and his grandmother, the Dowager Princess of Wales.

Princess Augusta of Saxe-Gotha

Augusta of Saxe-GothaAugustaAugusta, Princess of Wales
His godparents were: his uncle Adolphus Frederick IV, Duke of Mecklenburg-Strelitz (for whom the Lord Chamberlain, William Cavendish, 4th Duke of Devonshire, stood proxy); his paternal great-uncle Prince William, Duke of Cumberland; and his grandmother, the Dowager Princess of Wales.

Heir apparent

heir-apparentheirs apparentheir
Animosity developed between the prince and his father, who desired more frugal behaviour on the part of the heir apparent.

Act of Settlement 1701

Act of SettlementHanoverian successionAct of Settlement, 1701
This was in spite of the Act of Settlement 1701, which barred the spouse of a Catholic from succeeding to the throne, and the Royal Marriages Act 1772, which prohibited his marriage without the King's consent.

Mayfair

Mayfair, LondonMayfair, London, EnglandUpper Brook Street, Mayfair, London
Nevertheless, the couple went through a marriage ceremony on 15 December 1785 at her house in Park Street, Mayfair.

Canon law

canonecclesiastical lawcanons
However, Fitzherbert believed that she was the prince's canonical and true wife, holding the law of the Church to be superior to the law of the State.

Whigs (British political party)

WhigWhigsWhig Party
Acting on the prince's authority, the Whig leader Charles James Fox declared that the story was a calumny.

Richard Brinsley Sheridan

SheridanRichard SheridanR. B. Sheridan
He appeased her by asking another Whig, Richard Brinsley Sheridan, to restate Fox's forceful declaration in more careful words.

Porphyria

porphyriasAcute porphyriamadness
In the summer of 1788 the King's mental health deteriorated, possibly as the result of the hereditary disease porphyria.

Prorogation

proroguedprorogueproroguing
He was nonetheless able to discharge some of his duties and to declare Parliament prorogued from 25 September to 20 November.

Speech from the throne

Queen's Speechthrone speechKing's Speech
During the prorogation he became deranged, posing a threat to his own life, and when Parliament reconvened in November the King could not deliver the customary speech from the throne during the State Opening of Parliament.

State Opening of Parliament

Opening of ParliamentopenedQueen's Speech
During the prorogation he became deranged, posing a threat to his own life, and when Parliament reconvened in November the King could not deliver the customary speech from the throne during the State Opening of Parliament.

Peerages in the United Kingdom

British peerpeerpeerage
Among other things, the Prince of Wales would not be able either to sell the King's property or to grant a peerage to anyone other than a child of the King.

Lords Commissioners

Royal CommissionLord CommissionerCommission
The speech was normally delivered by the King, but could also be delivered by royal representatives known as Lords Commissioners; but no document could empower the Lords Commissioners to act unless the Great Seal of the Realm was affixed to it.

Lord Chancellor

Lord High Chancellor of Great BritainLord Chancellor of EnglandChancellor
Pitt and his fellow ministers ignored the last requirement and instructed the Lord Chancellor to affix the Great Seal without the King's consent, as the act of affixing the Great Seal in itself gave legal force to the bill.

Legal fiction

fictitiousdeemedfictitious proceeding
This legal fiction was denounced by Edmund Burke as "forgery, fraud", a "glaring falsehood", and as a "palpable absurdity".

Edmund Burke

BurkeBurkeanBurkian
This legal fiction was denounced by Edmund Burke as "forgery, fraud", a "glaring falsehood", and as a "palpable absurdity".

Chapel Royal

Chapels RoyalChapel Royal, WhitehallChapel Royal, St James's Palace
In 1795, the prince acquiesced; and they were married on 8 April 1795 at the Chapel Royal, St James's Palace.