George Mason

George Mason IVaddressedMasonMason, GeorgeMr. Mason
George Mason IV ( – October 7, 1792) was an American planter, politician and delegate to the U.S.wikipedia
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George Mason III

His father
His father died when he was young and his mother managed the family estates until he came of age. George Mason III (1690–1735) served in the House of Burgesses and, like his father, was county lieutenant.
Mason was the father of George Mason IV, a Founding Father of the United States.

Fairfax County, Virginia

Fairfax CountyFairfaxFairfax County, VA
Mason was born in 1725, most likely in what is now Fairfax County, Virginia. His son, George Mason II (1660–1716), was the first to move to what in 1742 became Fairfax County, then at the frontier between English and Native American areas.
Gunston Hall, the home of George Mason is nearby.

Gunston Hall

GunstonGunston Hall Plantationhomestead
He married in 1750, built Gunston Hall and lived the life of a country squire, supervising his lands, family and slaves.
The house was the home of the United States Founding Father George Mason.

Virginia House of Delegates

House of DelegatesState DelegateHouse
During the American Revolutionary War, Mason was a member of the powerful House of Delegates of the Virginia General Assembly but, to the irritation of Washington and others, he refused to serve in the Continental Congress in Philadelphia, citing health and family commitments.
There are many bronze and marble busts of historic Virginians on display in the Old House Chamber, including: George Mason, George Wythe, Patrick Henry, Richard Henry Lee, and Meriwether Lewis.

Fairfax Resolves

His writings, including substantial portions of the Fairfax Resolves of 1774, the Virginia Declaration of Rights of 1776, and his Objections to this Constitution of Government (1787) opposing ratification, have exercised a significant influence on American political thought and events.
Written primarily by George Mason, the resolutions rejected the British Parliament's claim of supreme authority over the American colonies.

United States Bill of Rights

Bill of RightsU.S. Bill of RightsUS Bill of Rights
The Virginia Declaration of Rights, which Mason principally authored, served as a basis for the United States Bill of Rights, of which he has been deemed the father.
On September 12, George Mason of Virginia suggested the addition of a Bill of Rights to the Constitution modeled on previous state declarations, and Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts made it a formal motion.

Fifth Virginia Convention

Virginia ConventionVirginia Convention of Delegates1776
As tensions grew between Britain and the American colonies, Mason came to support the colonial side, using his knowledge and experience to help the revolutionary cause, finding ways to work around the Stamp Act of 1765 and serving in the pro-independence Fourth Virginia Convention in 1775 and the Fifth Virginia Convention in 1776.
The convention amended, and on June 12 adopted, George Mason's Declaration of Rights, a precursor to the United States Bill of Rights.

Virginia Declaration of Rights

Declaration of RightsVirginia Bill of RightsBill of Rights
His writings, including substantial portions of the Fairfax Resolves of 1774, the Virginia Declaration of Rights of 1776, and his Objections to this Constitution of Government (1787) opposing ratification, have exercised a significant influence on American political thought and events. The Virginia Declaration of Rights and the 1776 Constitution of Virginia were joint works, but Mason was the main author.
Ten articles were initially drafted by George Mason circa May 20–26, 1776; three other articles were added in committee, seen in the original draft in the handwriting of Thomas Ludwell Lee, but the author is unknown.

Virginia Ratifying Convention

Virginia conventionVirginia Ratification Conventionratification convention
He failed to attain these objectives, and again at the Virginia Ratifying Convention of 1788, but his prominent fight for a bill of rights led fellow Virginian James Madison to introduce same during the First Congress in 1789; these amendments were ratified in 1791, a year before Mason died.
George Mason had refused to sign due to the lack of a Bill of Rights in Philadelphia and would continue in his opposition.

George Mason I

George Mason's great-grandfather, George Mason I, had been a Cavalier: militarily defeated in the English Civil War, some of them came to America in the 1640s and 1650s.
Mason was the great-grandfather of George Mason IV, a Founding Father of the United States.

George Mason II

His son, George Mason II (1660–1716), was the first to move to what in 1742 became Fairfax County, then at the frontier between English and Native American areas.
Mason was the grandfather of George Mason IV, a Founding Father of the United States.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
He briefly served in the House of Burgesses and involved himself in community affairs, sometimes serving with his neighbor George Washington.
Washington helped to lead widespread protests against the Townshend Acts passed by Parliament in 1767, and he introduced a proposal in May 1769 drafted by George Mason which called Virginians to boycott English goods; the Acts were mostly repealed in 1770.

Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
He also wrote a constitution for the state; Thomas Jefferson and others sought to have the convention adopt their ideas, but they found that Mason's version could not be stopped.
Jefferson consulted with other committee members over the next seventeen days, and drew on his own proposed draft of the Virginia Constitution, George Mason's draft of the Virginia Declaration of Rights, and other sources.

Constitutional Convention (United States)

Constitutional ConventionPhiladelphia ConventionConstitutional Convention of 1787
George Mason IV ( – October 7, 1792) was an American planter, politician and delegate to the U.S. Constitutional Convention of 1787, one of three delegates who refused to sign the Constitution.
George Mason of Virginia said the lower house was "to be the grand depository of the democratic principle of the government."

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
He failed to attain these objectives, and again at the Virginia Ratifying Convention of 1788, but his prominent fight for a bill of rights led fellow Virginian James Madison to introduce same during the First Congress in 1789; these amendments were ratified in 1791, a year before Mason died.
Before a quorum was reached at the Philadelphia Convention on May 25, 1787, Madison worked with other members of the Virginia delegation, especially Edmund Randolph and George Mason, to create and present the Virginia Plan.

Stafford County, Virginia

Stafford CountyStaffordStafford Counties
The immigrant George Mason settled in what is now Stafford County, Virginia, having obtained land as a reward for bringing his party to the colony as 50 acres were awarded for each person transported into the Colony of Virginia.
George Mason, another Founding Father, also lived in Stafford during his formative years.

Thomson Mason

his brother Thomson
In addition, Mason and his brother Thomson doubtlessly had the run of Mercer's library, one of the largest in Virginia, and the conversations of Mercer and the book-lovers who gathered around him were likely an education in themselves.
Mason was a younger brother of George Mason IV, United States patriot, statesman, and delegate from Virginia to the U.S. Constitutional Convention, father of Stevens Thomson Mason, a Colonel in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, a member of the Virginia state legislature, and a U.S. Senator from Virginia, and great-grandfather of Stevens T. Mason, first Governor of Michigan.

Mason Neck, Virginia

Mason NeckMason's NeckMason Neck, VA
He may have been born at his father's plantation on Dogue's Neck (later Mason Neck), but this is uncertain as his parents also lived on their lands across the Potomac in Maryland.
The recorded history of Mason Neck began around 1755 with the construction of Gunston Hall, the plantation house of George Mason, author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights.

Virginia militia

Virginia State MilitiaVirginia Colonial MilitiaVirginia provincial militia
George Mason III (1690–1735) served in the House of Burgesses and, like his father, was county lieutenant.
Colonel George Mason became the principal author of the Virginia Declaration of Rights which was published on June 12, 1776.

Ohio Company

Ohio Company of VirginiaOhio Countryextensive claims
One project that Mason was involved in for most of his adult life was the Ohio Company, in which he invested in 1749 and became treasurer in 1752—an office he held forty years until his death in 1792.
In 1752 George Mason, later to become a major founding father, became treasurer of the Ohio Company, a post he held for forty years until his death in 1792.

Constitution of Virginia

Virginia ConstitutionVirginia State ConstitutionConstitution
The Virginia Declaration of Rights and the 1776 Constitution of Virginia were joint works, but Mason was the main author.
Among those who drafted the 1776 Constitution were George Mason and James Madison.

Patrick Henry

American patriotPatrick Henry, Junrthat revolutionary patriot
The Resolves were mostly written by a fiery-spoken new member for Louisa County, Patrick Henry.
According to George Mason, a former burgess from Fairfax County, who joined the committee in the work, Henry took the lead.

John Mercer (colonial lawyer)

John Mercer
His widow Ann raised their son George (then 10) and two younger siblings as co-guardian with lawyer John Mercer, who was their uncle by marriage, having wed George Mason III's sister Catherine.
Uncle by marriage to George Mason, became Mason's legal guardian, along with Mason's mother.

George Mason V

his son George
Still, he felt that the "hopes of all the Union centre [sic] in this Convention", and wrote to his son George, "the revolt from Great Britain & the Formations of our new Government at that time, were nothing compared with the great Business now before us."
Mason was the eldest son of United States patriot, statesman, and delegate from Virginia to the U.S. Constitutional Convention, George Mason IV and his wife Ann Eilbeck.

Chopawamsic (plantation)

Chopawamsic
George Mason attained his majority in 1746, and continued to reside at Chopawamsic with his siblings and mother.
Chopawamsic was used as an occasional residence until Mason's death in 1735 when his widow and children, including George Mason IV, returned to live there.