George R. Stewart

George StewartStewart, George R.George Rippey Stewart
George Rippey Stewart (May 31, 1895 – August 22, 1980) was an American historian, toponymist, novelist, and a professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley.wikipedia
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Toponymy

toponymtoponymsplace name
George Rippey Stewart (May 31, 1895 – August 22, 1980) was an American historian, toponymist, novelist, and a professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley.
George R. Stewart theorized, in his book Names on the Globe, that Hellespont originally meant something like "narrow Pontus" or "entrance to Pontus", "Pontus" being an ancient name for the region around the Black Sea, and by extension, for the sea itself.

Earth Abides

His 1949 post-apocalyptic novel Earth Abides won the first International Fantasy Award in 1951.
Earth Abides is a 1949 post-apocalyptic science fiction novel by American writer George R. Stewart.

International Fantasy Award

His 1949 post-apocalyptic novel Earth Abides won the first International Fantasy Award in 1951.

American Name Society

Stewart was a founding member of the American Name Society in 1956-57, and he once served as an expert witness in a murder trial as a specialist in family names.
George R. Stewart, a founding member of the ANS, described his vision for using Names to define the field of onomastics.

Escape (radio program)

EscapeEscape'' (radio program)Escape series
It was dramatized on radio's Escape and served as an inspiration for Stephen King's The Stand, as King has stated.
Some of the memorable adaptations include Daphne du Maurier's "The Birds", Carl Stephenson's "Leiningen Versus the Ants", Algernon Blackwood's "Confession", Ray Bradbury's oft-reprinted "Mars Is Heaven", George R. Stewart's Earth Abides (the program's only two-parter), Richard Connell's "The Most Dangerous Game" and F. Scott Fitzgerald's "The Diamond as Big as the Ritz".

Sewickley, Pennsylvania

SewickleySewickley, PASewickley, Pa.
Born in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, George Rippey Stewart, Jr. was the son of engineer George Rippey Stewart Sr. (died 1937), who designed gasworks and electric railways and later became a citrus "rancher" in Southern California, and Ella Wilson Stewart (died 1937).

Storm (Stewart novel)

StormStorm'' (Stewart novel)
His 1941 novel Storm, featuring as its protagonist a Pacific storm called "Maria," which inspired Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe to write the song "They Call the Wind Maria" for their 1951 musical Paint Your Wagon.
Storm is a novel written by George Rippey Stewart and published in 1941.

The Stand

novel of the same nameCaptain TripsStephen King's The Stand
It was dramatized on radio's Escape and served as an inspiration for Stephen King's The Stand, as King has stated.
The author also mentions George R. Stewart's novel Earth Abides, which describes the odyssey of one of the last human survivors after the population is nearly annihilated by a plague, as one of the main inspirations:

Apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic fiction

post-apocalypticapocalypticpost-apocalyptic fiction
His 1949 post-apocalyptic novel Earth Abides won the first International Fantasy Award in 1951.
Written in 1949 by George R. Stewart, Earth Abides is the story of a man who finds most of civilization has been destroyed by a disease.

They Call the Wind Maria

They Call The Wind Mariah
His 1941 novel Storm, featuring as its protagonist a Pacific storm called "Maria," which inspired Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe to write the song "They Call the Wind Maria" for their 1951 musical Paint Your Wagon.
In George Rippey Stewart's 1941 novel Storm, he names the storm that is the protagonist of his story Maria.

University of California, Berkeley

UC BerkeleyUniversity of California at BerkeleyBerkeley
George Rippey Stewart (May 31, 1895 – August 22, 1980) was an American historian, toponymist, novelist, and a professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley. The younger Stewart earned a bachelor's degree from Princeton University in 1917, an MA from the University of California, Berkeley, and his Ph.D. in English literature from Columbia University in 1922.

Battle of Gettysburg

GettysburgBattle of GettsyburgGettysburg battlefield
His 1959 book, Pickett's Charge, a detailed history of the final attack at Gettysburg, was called "essential for an understanding of the Battle of Gettysburg".

Princeton University

PrincetonPrinceton CollegeCollege of New Jersey
The younger Stewart earned a bachelor's degree from Princeton University in 1917, an MA from the University of California, Berkeley, and his Ph.D. in English literature from Columbia University in 1922.

Columbia University

ColumbiaColumbia CollegeUniversity of Columbia
The younger Stewart earned a bachelor's degree from Princeton University in 1917, an MA from the University of California, Berkeley, and his Ph.D. in English literature from Columbia University in 1922.

Murder

first-degree murderfirst degree murdersecond-degree murder
Stewart was a founding member of the American Name Society in 1956-57, and he once served as an expert witness in a murder trial as a specialist in family names.

Arnold J. Toynbee

Arnold ToynbeeArnold Joseph ToynbeeToynbee
Taken together, this enlightening body of work provides a breadth and depth of perspective found elsewhere only in authors like Toynbee, the Durants, and Carroll Quigley, but in a far more palatable and accessible form.

Ariel Durant

Durant, ArielArielDurants
Taken together, this enlightening body of work provides a breadth and depth of perspective found elsewhere only in authors like Toynbee, the Durants, and Carroll Quigley, but in a far more palatable and accessible form.

Carroll Quigley

C QuigleyDr. Carroll QuigleyQuigley, Carroll
Taken together, this enlightening body of work provides a breadth and depth of perspective found elsewhere only in authors like Toynbee, the Durants, and Carroll Quigley, but in a far more palatable and accessible form.

Stephen King

StephenKing, StephenKing
It was dramatized on radio's Escape and served as an inspiration for Stephen King's The Stand, as King has stated.

Alan Jay Lerner

LernerAlan J. LernerAlan Lerner
His 1941 novel Storm, featuring as its protagonist a Pacific storm called "Maria," which inspired Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe to write the song "They Call the Wind Maria" for their 1951 musical Paint Your Wagon.

Frederick Loewe

LoeweF. LoeweFrederick (Fritz) Loewe
His 1941 novel Storm, featuring as its protagonist a Pacific storm called "Maria," which inspired Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe to write the song "They Call the Wind Maria" for their 1951 musical Paint Your Wagon.

Paint Your Wagon (musical)

Paint Your WagonPaint Your Wagon'' (musical)They Call The Wind Maria
His 1941 novel Storm, featuring as its protagonist a Pacific storm called "Maria," which inspired Alan Jay Lerner and Frederick Loewe to write the song "They Call the Wind Maria" for their 1951 musical Paint Your Wagon.

Walt Disney anthology television series

The Wonderful World of DisneyWalt Disney's Wonderful World of ColorDisneyland
Storm was dramatized as A Storm Called Maria on the November 2, 1959 episode of ABC's Walt Disney Presents.