George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonPresident WashingtonGeorgeGeneral George WashingtonPresident George WashingtonColonel George WashingtonGen. George WashingtonWashington, Georgefirst President
George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was an American political leader, military general, statesman, and Founding Father who served as the first president of the United States (1789–1797).wikipedia
6,347 Related Articles

Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
He promoted and oversaw implementation of a strong, well-financed national government, but remained impartial in the fierce rivalry between subordinates Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton.
He became the United States Minister to France in May 1785, and subsequently the nation's first secretary of state in 1790–1793 under President George Washington.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
He promoted and oversaw implementation of a strong, well-financed national government, but remained impartial in the fierce rivalry between subordinates Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton.
As the first Secretary of the Treasury, Hamilton was the main author of the economic policies of George Washington's administration.

Siege of Yorktown

YorktownBattle of Yorktownsurrender at Yorktown
During the Revolutionary War he was a delegate to the Continental Congress, was unanimously appointed commander-in-chief of the Army, and led an allied campaign to victory at the Siege of Yorktown ending the conflict.
The Siege of Yorktown, also known as the Battle of Yorktown, the Surrender at Yorktown, German Battle or the Siege of Little York, ending on October 19, 1781, at Yorktown, Virginia, was a decisive victory by a combined force of American Continental Army troops led by General George Washington and French Army troops led by the Comte de Rochambeau over a British Army commanded by British peer and Lieutenant General Charles Cornwallis.

George Washington's Farewell Address

Farewell AddressWashington's Farewell Address1796 ''Farewell Address
Washington's Farewell Address was widely regarded as one of the most influential statements on republicanism.
George Washington's farewell address is a letter written by President George Washington as a valedictory to "friends and fellow-citizens" after 20 years of public service to the United States.

Continental Army

ContinentalContinentalsAmerican
During the Revolutionary War he was a delegate to the Continental Congress, was unanimously appointed commander-in-chief of the Army, and led an allied campaign to victory at the Siege of Yorktown ending the conflict.
General George Washington was the commander-in-chief of the army throughout the war.

Jay Treaty

Jay's Treatytreatyagreed
In the French Revolution, Washington proclaimed a policy of neutrality while sanctioning the Jay Treaty.
The Treaty was designed by Alexander Hamilton and supported by President George Washington.

Mount Vernon

Mt. VernonMount Vernon PlantationMount Vernon Estate
When he was three, the family moved from Popes Creek plantation to the Epsewasson plantation on the Potomac River.
Mount Vernon was the plantation of George Washington, the first President of the United States, and his wife, Martha Dandridge Custis Washington.

Historical rankings of presidents of the United States

rankedrankgenerally ranked
Washington has been memorialized by monuments, art, places, stamps, and currency, and he has been ranked by scholars among the four greatest American presidents.
Abraham Lincoln, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and George Washington are most often listed as the three highest-rated Presidents among historians.

Augustine Washington

Augustine
He was the first child of Augustine and Mary Ball Washington, Augustine's second wife.
Augustine Washington Sr. (November 12, 1694 – April 12, 1743) was the father of the first U.S. President George Washington.

Mason Locke Weems

Parson Weemscherry tree" anecdotecherry-tree anecdote
This is said to be the setting of an anecdote of Parson Weems, who averred that Augustine once asked George whether he had damaged a cherry tree, and the boy replied, "I cannot tell a lie; I cut it with my little hatchet."
Mason Locke Weems (October 11, 1759 – May 23, 1825), usually referred to as Parson Weems, was an American book agent and author who wrote the first biography of George Washington immediately after his death.

Lawrence Washington (1659–1698)

Lawrence WashingtonLawrence
His great-grandfather John Washington settled in Virginia in 1657, established Popes Creek tobbaco plantation, and accumulated land and slaves, as did his son Lawrence, and his grandson Augustine.
Lawrence Washington (1659 – February 1698), a colonial-era American who is principally remembered as the paternal grandfather of George Washington.

Mary Ball Washington

Mary BallMary WashingtonGeorge Washington's mother
He was the first child of Augustine and Mary Ball Washington, Augustine's second wife.
Mary Ball Washington, born Mary Ball (November 30, 1708 – August 25, 1789), was the second wife of Augustine Washington, a planter in Virginia, and the mother of George Washington, the first President of the United States, and five other children.

Ferry Farm

Three years later, they relocated to Ferry Farm near Fredericksburg.
Ferry Farm (also known as the George Washington Boyhood Home Site or the Ferry Farm Site) is the name of the farm and home at which George Washington spent much of his childhood.

Potomac River

PotomacSouth Branch Potomac RiverNorth Branch Potomac River
When he was three, the family moved from Popes Creek plantation to the Epsewasson plantation on the Potomac River.
George Washington, the first President of the United States, was born in, surveyed, and spent most of his life within, the Potomac basin.

George Washington Birthplace National Monument

Popes CreekWakefieldBridges Creek
George Washington was born on February 22, 1732 at Popes Creek in Westmoreland County, Virginia.
A member of the assembly, he was a great-grandfather of George Washington, general and the first United States president.

Westmoreland County, Virginia

Westmoreland CountyWestmorelandWestmoreland (VA)
George Washington was born on February 22, 1732 at Popes Creek in Westmoreland County, Virginia.
Westmoreland County was the birthplace of George Washington, the first President of the United States (at the former settlement of Bridges Creek, Virginia); of James Monroe, the fifth President; and of General Robert E. Lee, commander of the Confederate armies.

Robert Dinwiddie

Governor DinwiddieGovernor Robert DinwiddieDinwiddie
He was initially trained in musters and drills; subsequently the lieutenant governor of Virginia, Robert Dinwiddie, appointed him adjutant, first to the Southern district in December 1752 and later to the Northern and Eastern districts as well.
Dinwiddie is credited for starting the military career of George Washington.

Culpeper, Virginia

CulpeperCulpeper Court HouseCulpeper Court House, Virginia
In 1749, Washington received a surveyor's license from the College of William & Mary, and was appointed surveyor of Culpeper, Virginia, with Fairfax's influence.
The original town was surveyed by a young George Washington, who at age 27 was a protege of the 6th Lord Fairfax.

Lawrence Washington (1718–1752)

Lawrence WashingtonLawrenceLawrence Washington)
Washington inherited Ferry Farm and ten slaves, while his older half-brother Lawrence inherited Epsewasson and changed its name to Mount Vernon.
Washington was the older and beloved half-brother of George Washington, the future President of the United States.

College of William & Mary

William & MaryCollege of William and MaryWilliam and Mary
In 1749, Washington received a surveyor's license from the College of William & Mary, and was appointed surveyor of Culpeper, Virginia, with Fairfax's influence.
A young George Washington (1732–1799) also received his surveyor's license through the college.

Battle of Fort Necessity

Fort NecessityGreat Meadowsattacking and capturing Washington at Fort Necessity
In July 1754, the French responded by attacking the fort in the ten-hour Battle of Fort Necessity, which ended in Washington's surrender.
The engagement, along with the May 28 skirmish known as the Battle of Jumonville Glen, was George Washington's first military experience and the only surrender of his military career.

French and Indian War

French and IndianSeven Years' WarNorth American theatre
He then became a leader of the Virginia militia in the French and Indian War.
The dispute erupted into violence in the Battle of Jumonville Glen in May 1754, during which Virginia militiamen under the command of 22 year-old George Washington ambushed a French patrol.

Martha Washington

MarthaMartha Dandridge CustisMartha Dandridge Custis Washington
At age 27, Washington married Martha Dandridge Custis, the 28-year-old wealthy widow of Daniel Parke Custis.
Martha Washington (née Dandridge; June 2 1731 – May 22, 1802) was the wife of George Washington, the first President of the United States.

Joseph Coulon de Jumonville

JumonvilleEnsign Joseph Coulon de Jumonville
Half-King Tanacharison discovered a detachment of French troops east of Uniontown, Pennsylvania, led by Joseph Coulon de Jumonville, so Washington built an entrenched camp at Great Meadows, called Fort Necessity.
His defeat and killing at the Battle of Jumonville Glen by forces led by George Washington was one of the sparks that ignited the Seven Years' War, known as the French and Indian War on the North American front.

Uniontown, Pennsylvania

UniontownUniontown, PAUniontown, Pa.
Half-King Tanacharison discovered a detachment of French troops east of Uniontown, Pennsylvania, led by Joseph Coulon de Jumonville, so Washington built an entrenched camp at Great Meadows, called Fort Necessity.
10 mi southeast of Uniontown is Fort Necessity, built by George Washington during the French and Indian War (part of the international Seven Years' War) as well as the site of the Battle of Jumonville Glen, where the North American branch of the war began.