George Washington's Farewell Address

Farewell AddressWashington's Farewell Address1796 ''Farewell Address1796 farewell addressfinal address to the American peoplehis farewell addressvoluntary retirementWashington Farewell Addresswould not be formed
George Washington's farewell address is a letter written by President George Washington as a valedictory to "friends and fellow-citizens" after 20 years of public service to the United States.wikipedia
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George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonPresident Washington
George Washington's farewell address is a letter written by President George Washington as a valedictory to "friends and fellow-citizens" after 20 years of public service to the United States.
Washington's Farewell Address was widely regarded as one of the most influential statements on republicanism.

Federalist Party

FederalistFederalistsF
This included the state of foreign affairs, and divisions between the newly formed Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties.
He warned in his Farewell Address against involvement in European wars and lamented the rising North-South sectionalism and party spirit in politics that threatened national unity: The party spirits serves always to distract the Public Councils, and enfeeble the Public Administration.

Pennsylvania Packet

American Daily AdvertiserThe Pennsylvania PacketPennsylvania Packet, or General Advertiser
The letter was first published as The Address of Gen. Washington to the People of America on His Declining the Presidency of the United States in the American Daily Advertiser on September 19, 1796, about ten weeks before the presidential electors cast their votes in the 1796 election.
On September 21, 1796, it was the first to publish George Washington's Farewell Address.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
However, he set it aside and ran for a second term because of heated disputes between Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton and Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson which convinced Washington that the growing tensions would rip apart the country without his leadership.
Hamilton influenced Washington in the composition of his Farewell Address by writing drafts for Washington to compare with the latter's draft, although when Washington contemplated retirement in 1792, he had consulted James Madison for a draft that was used in a similar manner to Hamilton's.

Presidency of George Washington

first inauguration of George Washingtoninauguratedpresidency
He wrote it near the end of his second term of presidency before retiring to his home at Mount Vernon in Virginia.
He delayed a formal announcement until later in the year, but began drafting his Farewell Address.

United States non-interventionism

isolationistisolationismnon-interventionist
United States non-interventionism
Washington's Farewell Address of 1796 explicitly announced the policy of American non-interventionism:

Hamilton (musical)

HamiltonHamilton: An American MusicalBurn
He suggested that it had long been "eclipsed in the national memory" until the Broadway musical Hamilton brought it back to popular awareness in the song "One Last Time", where lines are sung by Washington and Hamilton from the end of the Address.
Washington decides to retire from the presidency and Hamilton assists in writing a farewell address ("One Last Time").

Treaty of Alliance (1778)

Treaty of Alliance1778 Treaty of Alliancetreaty
The Republicans wanted the U.S. to honor the 1778 Treaty of Alliance and to aid France, while the Federalists favored an alliance with Britain.
The alliance was further attacked in President Washington's Farewell Address, in which he declared that the United States was not obligated to honor the military provisions of the treaty, and furthermore warned Americans of the dangers of the same kind of permanent alliances that the United States was currently engaged in with France, as a result of the Treaty of Alliance.

One Last Time (Hamilton song)

One Last TimeOne Last Time (''Hamilton'' song)
He suggested that it had long been "eclipsed in the national memory" until the Broadway musical Hamilton brought it back to popular awareness in the song "One Last Time", where lines are sung by Washington and Hamilton from the end of the Address.
He asks Hamilton to write his final address to the American people, discussing his philosophy of governance and the importance of knowing "how to say goodbye", and discusses his desire to retire and live the rest of his life outside public scrutiny.

Washington's Birthday

Presidents DayPresidents' DayPresident's Day
Washington's Birthday is observed by selecting a member of the Senate to read the address aloud on the Senate floor, alternating between political parties each year.
Since 1862 there has been a tradition in the United States Senate that George Washington's Farewell Address be read on his birthday.

Valedictorian

valedictoryco-valedictoriandux
George Washington's farewell address is a letter written by President George Washington as a valedictory to "friends and fellow-citizens" after 20 years of public service to the United States.

Mount Vernon

Mt. VernonMount Vernon PlantationMount Vernon Estate
He wrote it near the end of his second term of presidency before retiring to his home at Mount Vernon in Virginia.

1796 United States presidential election

17961796 presidential election1796 election
The letter was first published as The Address of Gen. Washington to the People of America on His Declining the Presidency of the United States in the American Daily Advertiser on September 19, 1796, about ten weeks before the presidential electors cast their votes in the 1796 election.

Republicanism in the United States

republicanismrepublicanAmerican republicanism
It is a classic statement of republicanism, warning Americans of the political dangers which they must avoid if they are to remain true to their values.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
The first draft was originally prepared by James Madison in June 1792, as Washington contemplated retiring at the end of his first term in office.

Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
However, he set it aside and ran for a second term because of heated disputes between Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton and Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson which convinced Washington that the growing tensions would rip apart the country without his leadership.

Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublican
This included the state of foreign affairs, and divisions between the newly formed Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties.

United States Constitution

ConstitutionU.S. Constitutionconstitutional
He reflects on the emerging issues of the American political landscape in 1796, expresses his support for the government eight years after the adoption of the Constitution, defends his administration's record, and gives valedictory advice to the American people.

Louisiana Territory

LouisianaTerritory of Louisianaterritorial
Washington goes on to warn the American people to question the ulterior motives of any person or group who argue that the land within the borders of the United States is too large to be ruled as a republic, an argument made by many during the debate on the proposed purchase of the Louisiana Territory, calling on the people to give the experiment of a large republic a chance to work before deciding that it cannot be done.

Sectionalism

sectionalsectional strifesectional crisis
He then offers strong warnings on the dangers of sectionalism, arguing that the true motives of a sectionalist are to create distrust or rivalries between regions and people to gain power and take control of the government.

Jay Treaty

Jay's Treatytreatyagreed
Washington points to two treaties acquired by his administration, the Jay Treaty and Pinckney's Treaty, which established the borders of the United States' western territories between Spanish Mexico and British Canada, and secured the rights of western farmers to ship goods along the Mississippi River to New Orleans.

Pinckney's Treaty

Treaty of MadridTreaty of San Lorenzoceded
Washington points to two treaties acquired by his administration, the Jay Treaty and Pinckney's Treaty, which established the borders of the United States' western territories between Spanish Mexico and British Canada, and secured the rights of western farmers to ship goods along the Mississippi River to New Orleans.

Mississippi River

MississippiMississippi ValleyMississippi River Valley
Washington points to two treaties acquired by his administration, the Jay Treaty and Pinckney's Treaty, which established the borders of the United States' western territories between Spanish Mexico and British Canada, and secured the rights of western farmers to ship goods along the Mississippi River to New Orleans.

East Coast of the United States

East CoastEastern SeaboardAtlantic Coast
He holds up these treaties as proof that the eastern states along the Atlantic Coast and the federal government are looking out for the welfare of all the American people and can win fair treatment from foreign countries as a united nation.

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation and Perpetual UnionArticles of Confederation and Perpetual Union.Confederation
Washington goes on to state his support for the new constitutional government, calling it an improvement upon the nation's original attempt in the Articles of Confederation.