George Washington's resignation as commander-in-chief

Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chiefGeneral George Washington resigns his commission as commander-in-chiefGeneral Washington resigned his commissionGeneral Washington's resigning of his commissionGeorge Washington resigned his commission as commander in chiefGeorge Washington resigns from the Armyhis resignation as commander of the armiesresign his commissionresign his commission as commander-in-chiefresignation as commander-in-chief
George Washington's resignation as commander-in-chief marked the end of Washington's military service in the American Revolutionary War and his return to civilian life at Mount Vernon.wikipedia
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Annapolis, Maryland

AnnapolisAnnapolis, MDAnnapolis, Md.
After the Treaty of Paris ending the war had been signed on September 3, 1783, and after the last British troops left New York City on November 25, Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army to the Congress of the Confederation, then meeting in the Maryland State House at Annapolis, Maryland, on December 23 of the same year.
At that time, General George Washington came before the body convened in the new Maryland State House and resigned his commission as commander of the Continental Army.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonPresident Washington
George Washington's resignation as commander-in-chief marked the end of Washington's military service in the American Revolutionary War and his return to civilian life at Mount Vernon.
Only a few trusted delegates of the Continental Congress, including Thomas Jefferson, knew of Washington's decision to resign his commission.

Congress of the Confederation

CongressConfederation CongressContinental Congress
After the Treaty of Paris ending the war had been signed on September 3, 1783, and after the last British troops left New York City on November 25, Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army to the Congress of the Confederation, then meeting in the Maryland State House at Annapolis, Maryland, on December 23 of the same year.
On December 23, at the Maryland State House, where the Congress met in the Old Senate Chamber, he addressed the civilian leaders and delegates of Congress and returned to them the signed commission they had voted him back in June 1775, at the beginning of the conflict.

Evacuation Day (New York)

Evacuation DayBritish evacuated New York Citythe last British forces left the city
After the Treaty of Paris ending the war had been signed on September 3, 1783, and after the last British troops left New York City on November 25, Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army to the Congress of the Confederation, then meeting in the Maryland State House at Annapolis, Maryland, on December 23 of the same year.
At their session in the Old Senate Chamber, he made a short statement and offered his sword and the papers of his commission to the President and the delegates, thereby resigning as commander-in-chief.

Maryland State House

State HouseChurch CircleCapitol of the State of Maryland
After the Treaty of Paris ending the war had been signed on September 3, 1783, and after the last British troops left New York City on November 25, Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army to the Congress of the Confederation, then meeting in the Maryland State House at Annapolis, Maryland, on December 23 of the same year.
It was in the Old Senate Chamber that Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army on December 23, 1783.

Continental Army

ContinentalContinentalsAmerican
After the Treaty of Paris ending the war had been signed on September 3, 1783, and after the last British troops left New York City on November 25, Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army to the Congress of the Confederation, then meeting in the Maryland State House at Annapolis, Maryland, on December 23 of the same year.
On December 23 he appeared in Congress, then sitting at Annapolis, and returned his commission as commander-in-chief: "Having now finished the work assigned me, I retire from the great theatre of Action; and bidding an Affectionate farewell to this August body under whose orders I have so long acted, I here offer my Commission, and take my leave of all the employments of public life."

Thomas Mifflin

first governor of Pennsylvania, Thomas Mifflin.General MifflinGeorge Mifflin House
The President of the Continental Congress, Thomas Mifflin, appointed a committee of Thomas Jefferson, James McHenry, and Elbridge Gerry to determine the details.
Mifflin's most important duty as president was to accept on behalf of Congress the resignation of General George Washington on December 23, 1783.

General George Washington Resigning His Commission

Washington's resignation was depicted by John Trumbull in 1824 with the life-size painting, General George Washington Resigning His Commission, now on view in the United States Capitol rotunda.
Trumbull considered George Washington's resignation as commander-in-chief to be "one of the highest moral lessons ever given to the world".

Washington's aides-de-camp

aide-de-campaides-de-campaide
At noon, on Tuesday, December 23, Charles Thomson, secretary of the Continental Congress, led Washington, accompanied by two of his aides-de-camp, Col. David Humphreys and Col. Benjamin Walker, into the Senate Chamber of the Maryland State House.
The commander-in-chief's headquarters staff was disbanded on December 23, 1783, when General Washington resigned his commission to Congress, then meeting at Annapolis, Maryland.

Benjamin Walker (New York)

Benjamin WalkerBenjamin Walker,
At noon, on Tuesday, December 23, Charles Thomson, secretary of the Continental Congress, led Washington, accompanied by two of his aides-de-camp, Col. David Humphreys and Col. Benjamin Walker, into the Senate Chamber of the Maryland State House.
On December 23, 1783, he was with Washington when he resigned his commission as commander-in-chief.

David Humphreys (soldier)

David HumphreysCol. David HumphreysColonel David Humphreys
At noon, on Tuesday, December 23, Charles Thomson, secretary of the Continental Congress, led Washington, accompanied by two of his aides-de-camp, Col. David Humphreys and Col. Benjamin Walker, into the Senate Chamber of the Maryland State House.
When Washington resigned his commission and presented himself before Congress, Humphreys was one of two aides who accompanied him into the chamber (the other was Benjamin Walker).

Three Mile Oak

Washington arrived at Annapolis on December 19, 1783, and was greeted by General William Smallwood and General Horatio Gates at the Three Mile Oak.
Washington resigned as commander-in-chief on December 23.

Legacy of George Washington

centennial celebrationcentenary of the first inaugurationcentennial
As Gordon Wood concludes, the greatest act in his life was his resignation as commander of the armies—an act that stunned aristocratic Europe.

United States Capitol rotunda

rotundaCapitol rotundaRotunda of the U.S. Capitol
Washington's resignation was depicted by John Trumbull in 1824 with the life-size painting, General George Washington Resigning His Commission, now on view in the United States Capitol rotunda.

Washington Monument (Baltimore)

Washington MonumentBaltimore's Washington MonumentWashington Monument in Baltimore
In 1829, the sculptor Enrico Causici completed the statue of Washington resigning his commission that is atop the Washington Monument in Baltimore.
The old Confederation Congress (1781-1789 under Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union) had first announced a desire for a sculpture in his honor in 1783 after the end of the War and of General Washington's resigning of his commission and after his death, revived the idea of a memorial.

December 23

23 December23
1783 – George Washington resigns as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Maryland.

1783 in the United States

1783
December 23 – George Washington's resignation as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army to the Congress of the Confederation in the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Maryland. He retires to his home at Mount Vernon. Washington's resignation affirms the new nation's commitment to the principle of civilian control of the military and prompts King George III of the United Kingdom to call him "the greatest character of the age."

1783

the previous year
December 23 – General George Washington resigns his commission as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army to the Congress of the Confederation in the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Maryland, and retires to his home at Mount Vernon. Washington's resignation, described by historian Thomas Fleming as "the most important moment in American history," affirms the United States' commitment to the principle of civilian control of the military, and prompts King George III to call Washington "the greatest character of the age."

Confederation Period

Critical PeriodConfederation
On December 23, 1783, Washington resigned from the army, earning the admiration of many for his willingness to relinquish power.

Baltimore City Circuit Courthouses

Baltimore City Circuit CourtBaltimore City CourthouseBaltimore City/County Courthouse
It is located in the Clarence Mitchell Courthouse in Baltimore.
In 1903, Edwin Blashfield's mural depicting General George Washington's resignation as commander-in-chief of the Continental Army at Annapolis, Maryland on December 23, 1783 was unveiled in Courtroom 451.

Military career of George Washington

General Washingtonmilitary experiencemilitary resignation
On December 23, 1783, Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief to the Congress of the Confederation at Annapolis, Maryland.

Maryland in the American Revolution

key political and military roles in the warState of Maryland
It was in the old senate chamber that George Washington resigned his commission as commander in chief of the Continental Army on December 23, 1783.

George Washington in the American Revolution

George WashingtonGeneralGeneral George Washington
On December 23, 1783, Washington resigned his commission as commander-in-chief to the Congress of the Confederation at Annapolis, Maryland, and retired to his home at Mount Vernon.

Liberty!

Liberty! The American Revolution
6) "Are We to Be a Nation?" (1783-1788): Creating the new nation, Washington resigns his commission, Noah Webster standardizes American English, Shays' Rebellion, the Confederation Congress, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison envision a new system of government, the Constitution, Bill of Rights and formation of a central government