George Washington Bridge

George WashingtonbridgeGW Bridge
The George Washington Bridge is a double-decked suspension bridge spanning the Hudson River, connecting the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City with the borough of Fort Lee in New Jersey.wikipedia
464 Related Articles

Fort Lee, New Jersey

Fort LeeAmerica's first motion picture industryFort Lee, NJ
The George Washington Bridge is a double-decked suspension bridge spanning the Hudson River, connecting the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City with the borough of Fort Lee in New Jersey.
In 1931 the borough became the western terminus of the George Washington Bridge, which crosses the Hudson River and connects to the borough of Manhattan borough in New York City.

Manhattan

Manhattan, New YorkManhattan, New York CityNew York
The George Washington Bridge is a double-decked suspension bridge spanning the Hudson River, connecting the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City with the borough of Fort Lee in New Jersey.
The borough hosts many prominent bridges, such as the Brooklyn, Manhattan, Williamsburg, Queensboro, Triborough, and George Washington Bridges; tunnels such as the Holland and Lincoln Tunnels; skyscrapers such as the Empire State Building, Chrysler Building, and One World Trade Center; and parks, such as Central Park.

Bergen County, New Jersey

Bergen CountyBergenBergen County, NJ
The opening of the George Washington Bridge contributed to the development of Bergen County, New Jersey, in which Fort Lee is located.
Located in the northeastern corner of New Jersey and its Gateway Region, Bergen County is part of the New York City Metropolitan Area and is directly across the Hudson River from Manhattan, to which it is connected by the George Washington Bridge.

U.S. Route 46

US 46Route 46Route 6
US 46, which lies entirely within New Jersey, terminates halfway across the bridge at the state border with New York.
The east end is in the middle of the George Washington Bridge over the Hudson River in Fort Lee, Bergen County while the route is concurrent with I-95 and US 1-9.

U.S. Route 1/9

Tonnelle AvenueUS 1/9U.S. Route 1-9
Interstate 95 (I-95) and U.S. Route 1/9 (US 1/9, composed of US 1 and US 9) cross the river via the bridge.
In Fort Lee, US 1/9 merges onto I-95 and crosses the Hudson River on the George Washington Bridge, where the two U.S. routes split a short distance into New York.

Interstate 95 in New York

I-95New England ThruwayInterstate 95
At its eastern terminus in New York City, the bridge continues onto the Trans-Manhattan Expressway (part of I-95, connecting to the Cross Bronx Expressway). The $183million project included the construction of the lower deck; the George Washington Bridge Expressway, a 12-lane expressway connecting to the Alexander Hamilton Bridge and the Cross Bronx Expressway (later I-95 and US 9); the George Washington Bridge Bus Station above the expressway; and a series of new ramps to and from the Henry Hudson Parkway.
In the U.S. state of New York, I-95 extends 23.50 mi from the George Washington Bridge in New York City to the Connecticut state line at Port Chester.

Othmar Ammann

Othmar H. AmmannO. H. AmmannOthmar Amman
The George Washington Bridge was designed by chief civil engineer Othmar Ammann, design engineer Allston Dana, and assistant chief engineer Edward W. Stearns, with Cass Gilbert as consulting architect.
Othmar Hermann Ammann (March 26, 1879 – September 22, 1965) was a Swiss-American civil engineer whose bridge designs include the George Washington Bridge, Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge, and Bayonne Bridge.

Port Authority of New York and New Jersey

Port AuthorityPort of New York AuthorityPANYNJ
It is owned by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, a bi-state government agency that operates infrastructure in the Port of New York and New Jersey.
Construction began in 1927 on the George Washington Bridge, linking the northern part of Manhattan with Fort Lee, New Jersey, with Port Authority chief engineer, Othmar Ammann, overseeing the project.

Hudson River

HudsonNorth RiverHudson River Watershed
The George Washington Bridge is a double-decked suspension bridge spanning the Hudson River, connecting the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City with the borough of Fort Lee in New Jersey.
The George Washington Bridge crosses the river between Fort Lee and the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan.

Trans-Manhattan Expressway

At its eastern terminus in New York City, the bridge continues onto the Trans-Manhattan Expressway (part of I-95, connecting to the Cross Bronx Expressway). The $183million project included the construction of the lower deck; the George Washington Bridge Expressway, a 12-lane expressway connecting to the Alexander Hamilton Bridge and the Cross Bronx Expressway (later I-95 and US 9); the George Washington Bridge Bus Station above the expressway; and a series of new ramps to and from the Henry Hudson Parkway.
The highway connects the George Washington Bridge over the Hudson River to the Alexander Hamilton Bridge over the Harlem River.

The Palisades (Hudson River)

Hudson PalisadesNew Jersey PalisadesPalisades
The anchorage on the New York side is a concrete structure, while the anchorage on the New Jersey side is bored directly into the cliff of the Palisades.
The Palisades are among the most dramatic geologic features in the vicinity of New York City, forming a canyon of the Hudson north of the George Washington Bridge, as well as providing a vista of the Manhattan skyline.

Interstate 95

I-9595I95
Interstate 95 (I-95) and U.S. Route 1/9 (US 1/9, composed of US 1 and US 9) cross the river via the bridge.
I-95 connects to New York via the George Washington Bridge.

Cass Gilbert

The George Washington Bridge was designed by chief civil engineer Othmar Ammann, design engineer Allston Dana, and assistant chief engineer Edward W. Stearns, with Cass Gilbert as consulting architect.
Gilbert was one of the first celebrity architects in America, designing skyscrapers in New York City and Cincinnati, campus buildings at Oberlin College and the University of Texas at Austin, state capitols in Minnesota and West Virginia, the support towers of the George Washington Bridge, railroad stations (including the New Haven Union Station, 1920), and the United States Supreme Court building in Washington, D.C..

List of longest suspension bridge spans

longest suspension bridgelongest suspension bridge in the worldlongest suspension bridge span
The George Washington Bridge measures 4760 ft long and has a main span of 3500 ft. It had the longest main bridge span in the world at the time of its opening and held that distinction until the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge in 1937. The bridge's main span was the longest main bridge span in the world at the time of its opening in 1931, and was nearly double the 1850 ft of the previous record holder, the Ambassador Bridge in Detroit.

U.S. Route 9

US 9United States Route 9US Route 9
Interstate 95 (I-95) and U.S. Route 1/9 (US 1/9, composed of US 1 and US 9) cross the river via the bridge.
The concurrency, an important and busy regional artery, continues past Newark Liberty International Airport and over the Pulaski Skyway, finally leaving the state along with US 1 and I-95 via the George Washington Bridge.

Bridge

road bridgerailway bridgebridges
The George Washington Bridge is a double-decked suspension bridge spanning the Hudson River, connecting the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City with the borough of Fort Lee in New Jersey.
Double-decked (or double-decker) bridges have two levels, such as the George Washington Bridge, connecting New York City to Bergen County, New Jersey, US, as the world's busiest bridge, carrying 102 million vehicles annually; truss work between the roadway levels provided stiffness to the roadways and reduced movement of the upper level when the lower level was installed three decades after the upper level.

Holland Tunnel

Boyle PlazaHollandworld's first mechanically ventilated vehicular tunnel
The first vehicular crossing across the lower Hudson River, the Holland Tunnel, was opened in 1927, connecting Lower Manhattan with Jersey City.
The Holland Tunnel is one of three vehicular crossings between Manhattan and New Jersey, the others being the Lincoln Tunnel and the George Washington Bridge.

Montgomery Case

Montgomery B. Case
Montgomery B. Case, chief construction engineer, began construction on the Hudson River bridge began on September 21, 1927 with groundbreaking ceremonies held at the sites of both future suspension towers.
His most notable project, the George Washington Bridge, achieved multiple world records including span length, cofferdam size, and use of deflection; earning the designation "Eighth Wonder of the World."

Washington Heights, Manhattan

Washington HeightsWashington Heights, New York City Washington Heights
The George Washington Bridge is a double-decked suspension bridge spanning the Hudson River, connecting the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City with the borough of Fort Lee in New Jersey.
Washington Heights is connected to Fort Lee, New Jersey across the Hudson River via the Othmar Ammann-designed George Washington Bridge, the world's busiest motor vehicle bridge.

Riverside Drive (Manhattan)

Riverside DriveRiverside Drive ViaductRiverside Boulevard
The approach was to consist of scenic, meandering ramps leading to both Riverside Drive and the Henry Hudson Parkway, which run along the eastern bank of the Hudson River at the bottom of the cliff in Washington Heights.
The boulevard runs on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, generally parallel to the Hudson River from 72nd Street to near the George Washington Bridge at 181st Street.

Ambassador Bridge

Detroit International Bridge CompanybridgeCanadian Transit Company
The bridge's main span was the longest main bridge span in the world at the time of its opening in 1931, and was nearly double the 1850 ft of the previous record holder, the Ambassador Bridge in Detroit.
The bridge over the Detroit River had the longest suspended central span in the world when it was completed in 1929—1,850 ft. This record held until the George Washington Bridge between New York and New Jersey opened in 1931.

Fort Washington Park (Manhattan)

Fort Washington ParkFort Washington Park (New York City)
A dispute developed between New York civic groups, who supported the construction of the Hudson River Bridge; and the Parks Conservation Association, who believed that the bridge towers would degrade the quality of Fort Washington Park directly underneath the proposed bridge's deck.
The George Washington Bridge crosses above the park, and below the bridge is the small point of land also called Jeffrey's Hook, which is the site of the Little Red Lighthouse.

U.S. Route 9 in New York

US 9U.S. Route 9US Route 9
The $183million project included the construction of the lower deck; the George Washington Bridge Expressway, a 12-lane expressway connecting to the Alexander Hamilton Bridge and the Cross Bronx Expressway (later I-95 and US 9); the George Washington Bridge Bus Station above the expressway; and a series of new ramps to and from the Henry Hudson Parkway.
In New York, US 9 extends 324.72 mi from the George Washington Bridge in Manhattan to an interchange with Interstate 87 (I-87) just south of the Canada–United States border in the town of Champlain.

New Jersey

NJState of New JerseyJersey
The George Washington Bridge is a double-decked suspension bridge spanning the Hudson River, connecting the Washington Heights neighborhood of Manhattan in New York City with the borough of Fort Lee in New Jersey.
The double-decked George Washington Bridge carries the heaviest load of motor vehicle traffic of any bridge in the world, at 102 million vehicles per year, across fourteen lanes.

New Jersey Route 4

Route 44NJ Route 4
New Jersey Route 4, which connected directly to the bridge's western end, opened in July 1932.
The highway stretches 10.83 mi from Route 20 (McLean Boulevard) in Paterson east to an interchange with Interstate 95 (I-95), U.S. Route 1/9 (US 1/9), US 46, and US 9W at the George Washington Bridge approach in Fort Lee.