George Washington Carver

Photograph, c. undefined 1910
The farm house of Moses Carver (built in 1881), near the place where George Carver lived as a youth.
At work in his laboratory
George Washington Carver (front row, center) poses with fellow faculty of Tuskegee Institute in this c. 1902 photograph taken by Frances Benjamin Johnston.
Photograph of George Washington Carver taken by Frances Benjamin Johnston in 1906.
"One of America's great scientists." U.S. World War II poster circa 1943
Peanut specimen collected by Carver
United States Farm Security Administration portrait, March 1942
"Austin Curtis - Scientist successor to Dr. Carver", cartoon by C.H. Alston
Painting by Betsy Graves Reyneau
A monument to Carver at the Missouri Botanical Garden in St. Louis
1948 US postage stamp
1951 Carver-Washington commemorative half dollar

George Washington Carver (c.

- George Washington Carver
Photograph, c. undefined 1910

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Tuskegee University

Private, historically black land-grant university in Tuskegee, Alabama.

Private, historically black land-grant university in Tuskegee, Alabama.

History class at Tuskegee, 1902
Original campus buildings on the Miller plantation, 1882
Booker T. Washington
The Oaks, Booker T. Washington's home on the Tuskegee campus, c. 1906
George Washington Carver (front row, center) poses with fellow faculty of Tuskegee Institute in this c. 1902 photograph taken by Frances Benjamin Johnston.
Tuskegee Institute, c. 1916
Tuskegee University Chapel (1969)
The Tuskegee University Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center
A view of the Tuskegee University campus – White Hall bell tower
College of Veterinary Medicine – Fredrick D Patterson Hall
College of Engineering – Luther H. Foster Hall has long been home to one of the nation's best engineering programs containing: Aerospace Science Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Materials Science Engineering, Mechanical and Military Science
Tuskegee University School of Nursing – Basil O'Connor Hall. Tuskegee Institute Training School of Nurses was registered with the State Board of Nursing in Alabama in September 1892 under the auspices of Tuskegee University's John A. Andrew Memorial Hospital. In 1948, the School began its baccalaureate program leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Nursing. This program has the distinction of being the first Baccalaureate Nursing program in the State of Alabama.
Robert R. Taylor School of Architecture and Construction Science is home to one of only 2 NAAB-accredited, architecture professional degree programs in the state of Alabama. It is also home to one of the top Construction Science and Management degree programs in the nation.
Tuskegee University's historic Cleveland Leigh Abbott Memorial Alumni Stadium, completed 1924. The stadium was the first of its kind to be built at any HBCU in the south.
The Lifting the Veil of Ignorance statue of Booker T. Washington was designed by sculptor Charles Keck and unveiled on April 5, 1922. The statue depicts Dr. Washington lifting the veil of ignorance off his people, who had once been enslaved, by showing them the ways of a better life through education and skills.
James Henry Meriwether Henderson Hall is Tuskegee University's new Agricultural Life Science Teaching, Extension and Research Building. Henderson Hall provides labs for teaching introductory courses in animal, plant, soil, and environmental sciences as well as biology and chemistry.
Built in 1906 and completely renovated in 2013, Tompkins Hall serves as the primary student dining facility and student center. The building includes a ballroom, an auditorium, a game room, a retail restaurant, and a 24-hour student study with healthy food vending machines. It is home to the offices of the Student Government Association.
The Legacy Museum houses: The African collection (contains approximately 900 items), the antiques and miscellaneous items collection and The Lovette W. Harper Collection of African Art. Third Floor exhibition contains "The United States Public Health Service Untreated Syphilis Study in the Negro Male, Macon County, Alabama 1932-1972."
Booker T. Washington is laid to rest in the Tuskegee University Campus Cemetery. Many other notable university people are interred on the Tuskegee campus including: George Washington Carver, Cleveland L. Abbott, William L. Dawson, Luther Hilton Foster (4th president), Frederick D. Patterson (3rd president), many other Washington family members and others.
Tuskegee University provides on-campus apartment style living for students in the Commons Apartments located across the campus in three different locations
Margaret Murray Washington Hall is home to Office of Admission, University Bookstore and additional dining services for the students
"The Avenue" is one of the main pedestrian corridors on campus that is rarely open to vehicular traffic
Booker T. Washington Boulevard is the main drive into the campus of Tuskegee University
Tuskegee University's campus has a park like setting and features many large green areas
College of Veterinary Medicine Williams Bowie Hall
Tuskegee football game
Main entrance to the campus
A scenic campus corridor
Interior view of the Tuskegee Chapel
Fall at Tuskegee University
George Washington Carver Museum
The Main Library, Hollis Burke Frissell now known as the Ford Motor Company Library/Learning Resource Center
Campus banners
Andrew F. Brimmer College of Business and Information Sciences
Daniel "Chappie" James Center
Daniel "Chappie" James Center -Tuskegee basketball pre-game warm-up
Daniel "Chappie" James Center basketball game
Tuskegee University campus partial view of the "Valley" and the Kellogg Hotel & Conference Center
I-85 exit for Tuskegee University

The university was home to scientist George Washington Carver and to World War II's Tuskegee Airmen.

Domesticated plants

Crop rotation

Practice of growing a series of different types of crops in the same area across a sequence of growing seasons.

Practice of growing a series of different types of crops in the same area across a sequence of growing seasons.

Domesticated plants

George Washington Carver (1860s–1943) studied crop-rotation methods in the United States, teaching southern farmers to rotate soil-depleting crops like cotton with soil-enriching crops like peanuts and peas.

Norman Borlaug, father of the Green Revolution.

Agricultural science

Broad multidisciplinary field of biology that encompasses the parts of exact, natural, economic and social sciences that are used in the practice and understanding of agriculture.

Broad multidisciplinary field of biology that encompasses the parts of exact, natural, economic and social sciences that are used in the practice and understanding of agriculture.

Norman Borlaug, father of the Green Revolution.

George Washington Carver

Indianola, Iowa

City in Warren County, Iowa, United States, located 14 mile south of downtown Des Moines, Iowa.

City in Warren County, Iowa, United States, located 14 mile south of downtown Des Moines, Iowa.

Gazebo and flower gardens in Buxton Park Arboretum
“FI0002378,” Indianola, IA 1990. Donated by Boylan Margie / Fortepan Iowa. CC-BY-SA,.

George Washington Carver, botanical researcher and agronomy educator

Official portrait, c. 1941–1945

Henry A. Wallace

American politician, journalist, farmer, and businessman who served as the 33rd vice president of the United States, the 11th U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, and the 10th U.S. Secretary of Commerce.

American politician, journalist, farmer, and businessman who served as the 33rd vice president of the United States, the 11th U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, and the 10th U.S. Secretary of Commerce.

Official portrait, c. 1941–1945
Wallace's father, Henry Cantwell Wallace, served as secretary of agriculture from 1921 to his death in 1924.
1940 electoral vote results
Wallace in 1940
Secretary of Commerce Henry Wallace
Wallace associated with controversial émigré Russian Theosophist Nicholas Roerich

Wallace took a strong interest in agriculture and plants from a young age and befriended African-American botanist George Washington Carver, with whom he frequently discussed plants and other subjects.

The birthplace of SIGMA: the 12th Street YMCA in Washington, D.C.

Phi Beta Sigma

Historically African American fraternity.

Historically African American fraternity.

The birthplace of SIGMA: the 12th Street YMCA in Washington, D.C.
Founding photo of Alpha chapter, Howard University, circa 1914
A porter for the Pullman Company Under the leadership of Sigma Brother A. Philip Randolph, the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters was able to gain rights under federal law.
Sigma Brother John Lewis speaks during the final day of the 2008 Democratic National Convention in Denver, Colorado.
The Westgate Las Vegas Resort & Casino will serve as the location of the Fraternity's 2019 Conclave
The seven regions of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity both within the United States and Internationally.
Phi Beta Sigma at the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Other notable members include scientist George Washington Carver; the first black Rhodes Scholar, Alain LeRoy Locke; Black Panther Party founder Huey P. Newton; organizer of the Million Man March Benjamin Chavis Muhammad; civil rights activists John Lewis, Hosea Williams and the Rev. Al Sharpton; musicians The Original Temptations; actors Blair Underwood, Ben Vereen and Terrence Howard; television personality Al Roker; and professional athletes Myron M Guyton, Jessie Small, Aaron Jones, Jerry Rice, Emmitt Smith, Hines Ward, Richard Sherman, and Ryan Howard.

Simpson College

Private Methodist liberal arts college in Indianola, Iowa.

Private Methodist liberal arts college in Indianola, Iowa.

Historic College Hall (formerly Old Chapel)
Wallace Hall (formerly Science Hall) housed George Washington Carver's first college classrooms.
alt=|George Washington Carver
alt=|David Orr
alt=|Ruth Hinshaw Spray
alt=|Nate Boulton
alt=|Alice Bellvadore Sams Turner

Simpson College was the first college attended by George Washington Carver. Carver entered Simpson as an art major, but became interested in the natural sciences after receiving advice from a fellow student. Carver once remarked that his time at Simpson taught him that he was "a human being." Carver left Simpson College to complete his undergraduate education at Iowa State College (now Iowa State University). Both schools have buildings named in his honor Carver Science Hall, at Simpson, and Carver Hall, at Iowa State University.

Diamond, Missouri

City in north central Newton County, Missouri, United States, located southeast of Joplin.

City in north central Newton County, Missouri, United States, located southeast of Joplin.

Diamond is primarily renowned as the birthplace of George Washington Carver.

Chicago World's Columbian Exposition 1893, with The Republic statue and Administration Building

World's Columbian Exposition

World's fair held in Chicago in 1893 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' arrival in the New World in 1492.

World's fair held in Chicago in 1893 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus' arrival in the New World in 1492.

Chicago World's Columbian Exposition 1893, with The Republic statue and Administration Building
Advertisement for the Exposition, depicting a portrait of Christopher Columbus
Thomas Moran – Chicago World's Fair – Brooklyn Museum painting of the Administration Building
Final vote in the United States House of Representatives on location of the 1893 World's Fair
Aerial view of the exposition at Jackson Park in a print by F.A. Brockhaus
Chicago Mayor Carter Harrison Sr. delivers a speech to crowd during "American Cities Day" at the exposition on October 28, 1893. Harrison would be assassinated later that day.
“Columbian Exposition” of 1892 book cover art
The original Ferris Wheel
An exhibit hall interior
Idaho Building
John Bull on display at the exposition.
Stereoscopic image of the Great Krupp Building
The Great Wharf, Moving Sidewalk
White City
Apart from official nation displays, non-white cultures were largely excluded from the main park and were instead found on the Midway.
The "Great White City"
Painting of the Agricultural Building
The Forestry Building
Golden Arch at Louis Sullivan's Transportation Building
Ticket for Chicago Day
Electricity was used to decorate the buildings with incandescent lights, illuminate fountains, and power three huge spotlights.
Westinghouses' World's Fair presentation explaining Tesla's AC induction motors and high frequency experiments
Bird's Eye View, 1893
Souvenir Map, 1893
Woman's Building Lemaire poster
Mammoth and Giant Octopus, display at the Columbian World's Fair, 1893
Electric kitchen
In 1923, notable Chicagoans associated with the fair met again.
alt=Nina, Pinta, Santa Maria replicas.|Pinta, Santa María, and Niña replicas from Spain.
alt=Viking, replica of the Gokstad Viking ship.|The Viking, a replica of the Gokstad ship.
alt=White City fire|After the fair, the White City on fire.
The Administration Building and Grand Court during the October 9, 1893, commemoration of the 22nd anniversary of the Chicago Fire.
The Manufactures and Liberal Arts Building, seen from the southwest.
Horticultural Building, with Illinois Building in the background.
A view toward the Peristyle from Machinery Hall.
Midway Plaisance
Frederick MacMonnies' Columbian Fountain.
"Canal of Venice" during Chicago World's Fair 1893
<center>Columbus postage issued at the Exposition</center>
<center>1893 postmark<center>used at the Exposition</center>
The Fisheries Building at the Exposition

The exhibition included a number of exhibits put on by black individuals and approved by white organizers of the fair, including exhibits by the sculptor Edmonia Lewis, a painting exhibit by scientist George Washington Carver, and a statistical exhibit by Joan Imogen Howard.

"Smooth" peanut butter in a jar

Peanut butter

Food paste or spread made from ground, dry-roasted peanuts.

Food paste or spread made from ground, dry-roasted peanuts.

"Smooth" peanut butter in a jar
Patent for peanut butter
An antique Shedd's Peanut Butter tin. Shedd was an American brand which was discontinued in the 1980s.
A Meal Ready to Eat or "MRE kit" which contains peanut butter packets.
A tractor being used to complete the first stage of the peanut harvesting process
Peanut butter cookies, a popular type of cookie made from peanut butter and other ingredients
Buckeyes, a type of peanut-butter-based confectionery product.

As the US National Peanut Board confirms, "Contrary to popular belief, George Washington Carver did not invent peanut butter."