Georgia (country)

"Gorgania" i.e. Georgia on Fra Mauro map
Patera depicting Marcus Aurelius uncovered in central Georgia, 2nd century AD
Northwestern Georgia is home to the medieval defensive Svan towers of Ushguli
Gelati Monastery, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Queen Tamar, the first woman to rule medieval Georgia in her own right.
King Vakhtang VI, a Georgian monarch caught between rival regional powers
The reign of George XII was marked by instability.
Noe Zhordania, Prime Minister of Georgia who was exiled to France after the Soviet takeover
The Bolshevik Red Army in Tbilisi on 25 February 1921. Saint David's church on the Holy Mountain is visible in the distance.
Georgian Civil War and the War in Abkhazia in August–October 1993
The Rose Revolution, 2003
US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice holding a joint press conference with Georgian president Mikheil Saakashvili during the Russo-Georgian war
Salome Zourabichvili, the first woman elected as president of Georgia
Presidential residence at the Orbeliani Palace in Tbilisi
Pro-NATO poster in Tbilisi
President of Georgia Salome Zourabichvili, President of Moldova Maia Sandu, President of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelensky and President of the European Council Charles Michel during the 2021 Batumi International Conference. In 2014, the EU signed Association Agreements with all the three states.
Georgian built Didgori-2 during the military parade in 2011
A Ford Taurus Police Interceptor operated by the Georgian Patrol Police.
Map of Georgia highlighting the disputed territories of Abkhazia and Tskhinvali Region (South Ossetia), both of which are outside the control of the central government of Georgia
Köppen climate classification map of Georgia
Mount Kazbek in eastern Georgia
Svaneti region of Georgia
View of the cave city of Vardzia and the valley of the Kura River below
Georgia's diverse climate creates varied landscapes, like these flat marshlands in the country's west
Southwest Georgia has a subtropical climate, with frequent rain and thick green vegetation
Georgian Shepherd Dog
GDP per capita development since 1973
A proportional representation of Georgia's exports in 2019
One of several plants operated by HeidelbergCement in Georgia
Wine-making is a traditional component of the Georgian economy.
The most visited ski resort of Georgia, Gudauri
The Georgian Railways represent a vital artery linking the Black Sea and Caspian Sea – the shortest route between Europe and Central Asia.
Port of Batumi
Ethno-linguistic groups in the Caucasus region
Tbilisi State University, Corpus I
Illuminated manuscript from medieval Georgia, showing a scene from nativity
Old Tbilisi – Architecture in Georgia is in many ways a fusion of European and Asian.
Rather than serving food in courses, traditional supras often present all that a host has to offer
Château Mukhrani, one of the centres of Georgia's viticulture in the 19th century, has recently been restored to produce its eponymous wine.
Dinamo Tbilisi, winner of 1981 European Cup Winners' Cup on stamp of Georgia, 2002
Château Mukhrani, one of the centres of Georgia's viticulture in the 19th century, has recently been restored to produce its eponymous wine.

Country located in the Caucasus, at the intersection of Eastern Europe and Western Asia.

- Georgia (country)

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Colchis and its eastern neighbor Iberia.

Colchis

Colchis and its eastern neighbor Iberia.
Map of Colchis and Iberia by Christoph Cellarius printed in Leipzig in 1706
Jason and the Argonauts arriving at Colchis. The Argonautica tells the myth of their voyage to retrieve the Golden Fleece. This painting is located in the Palace of Versailles.
Second century BC Greek bronze torso from Colchis, Georgian National Museum
Colchian pendants, riders and horses on wheeled platforms, Georgian National Museum

In Greco-Roman geography, Colchis was an exonym for the Georgian polity of Egrisi (ეგრისი) located on the coast of the Black Sea, centered in present-day western Georgia.

The Georgian kings, queens consort and the Catholicos-Patriarch depicted on a Byzantine-influenced fresco wearing Byzantine dress at the Gelati Monastery, UNESCO's World Heritage Site landmark.

Georgians

The Georgian kings, queens consort and the Catholicos-Patriarch depicted on a Byzantine-influenced fresco wearing Byzantine dress at the Gelati Monastery, UNESCO's World Heritage Site landmark.
Georgian peasant in Mestia, c. 1888
Armour of King Alexander III of Imereti with golden plates.
The Bagrati Cathedral, The Cathedral of the Dormition, built during the reign of King Bagrat III, one of Georgia's most significant medieval religious buildings returned to its original state in 2012.
Georgians having a feast at Supra and Tamada making a toast. Painting by Niko Pirosmani.

The Georgians, or Kartvelians (ქართველები, ), are a nation and indigenous Caucasian ethnic group native to Georgia and the South Caucasus.

Coat of arms of the Orthodox Church of Georgia

Georgian Orthodox Church

Autocephalous Eastern Orthodox church in full communion with the other churches of Eastern Orthodoxy.

Autocephalous Eastern Orthodox church in full communion with the other churches of Eastern Orthodoxy.

Coat of arms of the Orthodox Church of Georgia
Saint Nino of Cappadocia, baptizer of the Georgians.
Jvari Monastery, near Mtskheta, one of Georgia's oldest surviving monasteries (6th century)
A page from a rare 12th century Gelati Gospel depicting the Nativity
The Khakhuli triptych
Patriarch Anton II of Georgia was downgraded to the status of an archbishop by the Russian Imperial authorities.
Eparchies of the Georgian Apostolic Autocephalous Orthodox Church as of 2010
The Holy Trinity Church (Tsminda Sameba) of Gergeti, in the mountains of Khevi

It is Georgia's dominant religious institution, and a majority of Georgian people are members.

Kingdom of Iberia

Exonym (foreign name) for the Georgian kingdom of Kartli (ქართლი), known after its core province, which during Classical Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages was a significant monarchy in the Caucasus, either as an independent state or as a dependent of larger empires, notably the Sassanid and Roman empires.

Exonym (foreign name) for the Georgian kingdom of Kartli (ქართლი), known after its core province, which during Classical Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages was a significant monarchy in the Caucasus, either as an independent state or as a dependent of larger empires, notably the Sassanid and Roman empires.

Colchis and Iberia
Map of Iberia and Colchis by Christoph Cellarius printed in Leipzig in 1706
Iberia during the Roman Empire.

Iberia, centered on present-day Eastern Georgia, was bordered by Colchis in the west, Caucasian Albania in the east and Armenia in the south.

Mount Elbrus

Caucasus

Mount Elbrus
Mount Bazardüzü
Mount Shahdagh
Contemporary political map of the Caucasus
Ethno-linguistic groups in the Caucasus region in 2014
Petroglyphs in Gobustan, Azerbaijan, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, dating back to 10,000 BC
Kingdom of Georgia at the peak of its might, early 13th century.
Circassian strike on a Russian military fort in the Caucasus, 1840
Georgian Civil War and the War in Abkhazia in August–October 1993
View of the Caucasus Mountains in Dagestan, Russia
Rosa Khutor alpine ski resort near Krasnaya Polyana, Sochi, Russia, the site of the 2014 Winter Olympics venue
Etchmiadzin Cathedral in Armenia, original building completed in 303 AD, a religious centre of Armenia. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Svetitskhoveli Cathedral in Georgia, original building completed in the 4th century. It was a religious centre of monarchical Georgia. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Northwest Caucasus caftan, 8-10th century, from the region of Alania.
Svaneti defensive tower houses
Palace of the Shirvanshahs, 13-th-15th centuries
Imamzadeh of Ganja, 7th-9th centuries
Celebration of Ashura, (Persian:Shakhsey-Vakhsey),19th century
Shamakhi, 19th century

The Caucasus, or Caucasia , is a region between the Black Sea and the Caspian Sea; mainly comprising Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and parts of Southern Russia.

Kingdom of Georgia

Medieval Eurasian monarchy that was founded in circa 1008 AD.

Medieval Eurasian monarchy that was founded in circa 1008 AD.

Kingdom of Georgia in ~1220, at the peak of its territorial expansion.
Map of the Caucasus region and surrounding areas at 1000 AD, before the death of David III.
Kingdom of Georgia in ~1220, at the peak of its territorial expansion.
Kingdom of Georgia in 1045 AD
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Expansion of Kingdom of Georgia under David IV's reign.
Gelati Monastery, a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Kingdom of Georgia under Queen Tamar's reign.
Queen Tamar and her father King George III (restored fresco from the Betania monastery)
Medieval Georgian monasteries in Balkans and Near East.
During Tamara's reign, the Kingdom patronized Georgian-built religious centers overseas, such as this Iviron Monastery
Eldiguzid campaign of Tamar of Georgia in 1208 and 1210–1211 years.
Mongol invasion of Georgia and battle of Khunan.
Map of Kingdom of Georgia during Mongol invasions, 1245 AD.
Western and Eastern Georgia around 1311 AD.
Kingdom of Georgia, 1380.
Map of Caucasus Region 1405.
Map of Caucasus Region 1460.
Map of Caucasus Region 1490.
Map of Georgia (Description of the Kingdom of Georgia) by Prince Vakhushti Bagrationi, 1740s.
300x300px
Archangel of Kintsvisi, complete with scarce natural ultramarine paint, evidenced the increasing resources of the realm
Golden Theotokos of Khobi Monastery, with some precious stones taken by the communists
Triptych of Khakhuli
Detail of the Khakhuli Triptych
Atskuri Triptych
Georgian tondo commemorating Roman martyr Mammes of Caesarea
David IV's processional cross
Crucifixion from Mestia
Fresco from Ubisi, Georgia
The Last Supper of Ubisi
Annunciation of Ubisi
Gelati Monastery
Walls of the Khobi Monastery showing strong Roman influence
Kvatakhevi monastery
Betania Monastery
Pitareti Monastery
Despite setbacks at the hands of Mongols, Georgia continued to produce cultural landmarks, such as these frescoes at Ubisi by Damiane - one of Georgia's distinctive medieval artists.
Golden cross of Queen Tamar, composed of rubies, emeralds, and large pearls
Gelati Theotokos. The use of costly mosaics in church decorations heralded Georgia's imperial ambitions.{{sfn|Eastmond|1998|p=61}}

It was the principal historical precursor of present-day Georgia.

Democratic Republic of Georgia

Democratic Republic of Georgia with territorial claims and disputed areas
Nikolay Chkheidze, president of the Georgian Provisional Assembly, later the Constituent Assembly
Democratic Republic of Georgia with territorial claims and disputed areas
National Council meeting, May 26, 1918
British troops marching in Batumi, 1920
Noe Ramishvili became the chairman of the first government of the Republic. In 1930, he was assassinated by a Bolshevik spy in Paris.
The leaders of the Second International visiting Tbilisi, 1918
Fragments of the Constitution of Georgia adopted by the Constituent Assembly of Georgia on 21st February 1921
Noe Zhordania, the chairman of the second and the third government of the Republic
Map of the borders of the territory that was proposed by the Georgian delegation at the Paris Peace Conference of 1919 for inclusion in the Democratic Republic of Georgia, as well as the territories that after 1921 were part of neighboring states.
Soldiers of the People's Guard of Georgia
A bilingual plaque which reads: "On May 26, 1918, in this hall the National Council of Georgia adopted the act of independence, thereby restoring the statehood of Georgia"

The Democratic Republic of Georgia (DRG; საქართველოს დემოკრატიული რესპუბლიკა sakartvelos demokratiuli respublika) was the first modern establishment of a republic of Georgia, which existed from May 1918 through February 1921.

Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic

One of the republics of the Soviet Union from its second occupation (by Russia) in 1921 to its independence in 1991.

One of the republics of the Soviet Union from its second occupation (by Russia) in 1921 to its independence in 1991.

Location of Georgia (red) within the Soviet Union
Order of the Red Banner of the Georgian SSR, 1923
Location of Georgia (red) within the Soviet Union
Members of the first Supreme Soviet of the Georgian SSR
Workers at a factory in the Georgian SSR
Flag of the Republic of Georgia, 1990–2004
Map of the Georgian & Abkhazian Socialist Soviet Republics in 1922-1931
Map of the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic in 1931-1943
Map of the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic in 1944-1955
Map of the Georgian Soviet Socialist Republic in 1957-1991

Coterminous with the present-day republic of Georgia, it was based on the traditional territory of Georgia, which had existed as a series of independent states in the Caucasus prior to the first occupation of annexation in the course of the 19th century.

Computer rendering of Eastern Europe

Eastern Europe

Ambiguous term that refers to the eastern portions of the European continent.

Ambiguous term that refers to the eastern portions of the European continent.

Computer rendering of Eastern Europe
Traditional cultural borders of Europe: usage recommendation by the Standing Committee on Geographical Names, Germany.
Expansion of Christianity<ref>{{cite web|url=http://rbedrosian.com/Maps/ahgh66b.htm |title=Atlas of the Historical Geography of the Holy Land |publisher=Rbedrosian.com |access-date=23 February 2013 |url-status=dead |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20130610034842/http://rbedrosian.com/Maps/ahgh66b.htm |archive-date=10 June 2013 }}</ref><ref>{{cite web|url=http://home.comcast.net/~DiazStudents/MiddleAgesChurchMap1.jpg |title=home.comcast.net |access-date=23 February 2013 |url-status=dead |archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20130213233630/http://home.comcast.net/~DiazStudents/MiddleAgesChurchMap1.jpg |archive-date=February 13, 2013 }}</ref>

A large part of Eastern Europe is formed by countries with dominant Orthodox churches, like Armenia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Georgia, Greece, Moldova, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Romania, Russia, Serbia, and Ukraine, for instance.

Abkhazia

The Kingdom of Abkhazia was united through dynastic succession with the newly formed Kingdom of Georgia in 1008 when Bagrat II of Abkhazia became Bagrat III of Georgia.
The borders of the Sukhumi District of the Kutaisi Governorate in 1899 when Abkhazia was part of the Russian Empire.
Abkhaz and Georgian generals in the Imperial Russian Army, 19th century
Map of the Soviet Caucasus (1957–91) showing the Abkhaz ASSR within the Georgian SSR.
Georgian Civil War and the War in Abkhazia in August–October 1993
Exhibition at the 2005 commemoration of the ethnic cleansing in Abkhazia, held on its 12th anniversary in Tbilisi.
Abkhazians carrying the republic's flags in a parade.
Seaside in Pitsunda, Abkhazia in 2006
Map of Georgia highlighting Abkhazia (green) and South Ossetia (purple).
The Russian embassy in Sukhumi
Dmitry Medvedev (centre, with dark tie) visited the Russian military base in Gudauta in 2010
The leaders of Abkhazia, Russia and South Ossetia, shortly after the 2008 war. Left to right: South Ossetian President Eduard Kokoity; Russian President Dmitry Medvedev; Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov; Abkhazian President Sergei Bagapsh.
Border checkpoint on the Psou River
The breakaway republics of Abkhazia, South Ossetia and Nagorno-Karabakh within the Caucasus region
Abkhazian President Alexander Ankvab with Transnistrian President Yevgeny Shevchuk in September 2013
"View of Mount Agepsta and Turyi gory (Tur Mountains) from the top of Kamennyi Stolb, Aibga Ridge.", 2014.
View from Pitsunda cape
Logo of the Government of the Autonomous Republic of Abkhazia.
1) Gagra
2) Gudauta
3) Sukhumi
4) Gulripshi
5) Ochamchira
6) Tkvarcheli
7) Gali
Beach in Gagra in May 2014
New Athos monastery in Abkhazia
Russian Drama Theatre. Sukhumi, Abkhazia.
Daur Akhvlediani Stadium, Gagra

Abkhazia ( or ), officially the Republic of Abkhazia, is a de facto state in the South Caucasus, recognised by most countries as part of Georgia, which views the region as an autonomous republic.