A report on Georgia (country)

"Gorgania" i.e. Georgia on Fra Mauro map
Patera depicting Marcus Aurelius uncovered in central Georgia, 2nd century AD
Northwestern Georgia is home to the medieval defensive Svan towers of Ushguli
Gelati Monastery, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Queen Tamar, the first woman to rule medieval Georgia in her own right.
King Vakhtang VI, a Georgian monarch caught between rival regional powers
The reign of George XII was marked by instability.
Noe Zhordania, Prime Minister of Georgia who was exiled to France after the Soviet takeover
The Bolshevik Red Army in Tbilisi on 25 February 1921. Saint David's church on the Holy Mountain is visible in the distance.
Georgian Civil War and the War in Abkhazia in August–October 1993
The Rose Revolution, 2003
US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice holding a joint press conference with Georgian president Mikheil Saakashvili during the Russo-Georgian war
Salome Zourabichvili, the first woman elected as president of Georgia
Presidential residence at the Orbeliani Palace in Tbilisi
Pro-NATO poster in Tbilisi
President of Georgia Salome Zourabichvili, President of Moldova Maia Sandu, President of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelensky and President of the European Council Charles Michel during the 2021 Batumi International Conference. In 2014, the EU signed Association Agreements with all the three states.
Georgian built Didgori-2 during the military parade in 2011
A Ford Taurus Police Interceptor operated by the Georgian Patrol Police.
Map of Georgia highlighting the disputed territories of Abkhazia and Tskhinvali Region (South Ossetia), both of which are outside the control of the central government of Georgia
Köppen climate classification map of Georgia
Mount Kazbek in eastern Georgia
Svaneti region of Georgia
View of the cave city of Vardzia and the valley of the Kura River below
Georgia's diverse climate creates varied landscapes, like these flat marshlands in the country's west
Southwest Georgia has a subtropical climate, with frequent rain and thick green vegetation
Georgian Shepherd Dog
GDP per capita development since 1973
A proportional representation of Georgia's exports in 2019
One of several plants operated by HeidelbergCement in Georgia
Wine-making is a traditional component of the Georgian economy.
The most visited ski resort of Georgia, Gudauri
The Georgian Railways represent a vital artery linking the Black Sea and Caspian Sea – the shortest route between Europe and Central Asia.
Port of Batumi
Ethno-linguistic groups in the Caucasus region
Tbilisi State University, Corpus I
Illuminated manuscript from medieval Georgia, showing a scene from nativity
Old Tbilisi – Architecture in Georgia is in many ways a fusion of European and Asian.
Rather than serving food in courses, traditional supras often present all that a host has to offer
Château Mukhrani, one of the centres of Georgia's viticulture in the 19th century, has recently been restored to produce its eponymous wine.
Dinamo Tbilisi, winner of 1981 European Cup Winners' Cup on stamp of Georgia, 2002
Château Mukhrani, one of the centres of Georgia's viticulture in the 19th century, has recently been restored to produce its eponymous wine.

Country located in the Caucasus, at the intersection of Eastern Europe and Western Asia, identifying itself as European.

- Georgia (country)

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2013 Georgian presidential election

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Presidential elections were held in Georgia on 27 October 2013, the sixth presidential elections since the country's restoration of independence from the Soviet Union in 1991.

Legality of cannabis

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[[File:Map-of-world-cannabis-laws.svg|thumb|400px|alt=Map of world cannabis laws for non-medical use|Legal status of cannabis possession for recreational use

[[File:Map-of-world-cannabis-laws.svg|thumb|400px|alt=Map of world cannabis laws for non-medical use|Legal status of cannabis possession for recreational use

Countries that have legalized recreational use of cannabis are Canada, Georgia, Malta, Mexico, South Africa, Thailand, and Uruguay, plus 19 states, 2 territories, and the District of Columbia in the United States and the Australian Capital Territory in Australia.

Inside garden of the Parliament building after the coup

1991–1992 Georgian coup d'état

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Inside garden of the Parliament building after the coup
Inside garden of the Parliament building after the coup
The Act of Restoration of Georgian Independence signed on 9 April 1991.
Kitovani in the Rkoni Gorge following his mutiny.
Former HQ of the Tbilisi KGB, where several political prisoners were jailed by Gamsakhurdia.
Mkhedrioni flag
Georgian parliament building on Rustaveli Avenue
Zviadist fighters taking cover behind the Parliament building
Opposition soldiers
Vladimir Lobov, head of the Soviet army from 1989 to 1991.
Hotel Tbilisi became, in December 1991, the HQ of the armed opposition.
The Kashveti Church becomes a target during the coup.
3 January protesters fleeing after an attack by the Military Council. Two were killed instantly and dozens wounded.
View of Rustaveli Avenue, center of the war.
The interior of Parliament was taken by force by opposition soldiers several times.
Zviad Gamsakhurdia
Gamsakhurdia and his guard in his bunker
View of Rustaveli Avenue after the conflict
Jokhar Dudayev, President of Ichkeria, welcomes Gamsakhurdia in Grozny.
Eduard Shevardnadze became the head of the Georgian state as soon as March 1992.
George H.W. Bush (left) and Boris Yeltsin (right).

The 1991–1992 Georgian coup d'état, also known as the Tbilisi War, or the Putsch of 1991–1992, was an internal military conflict that took place in the newly independent Republic of Georgia following the fall of the Soviet Union, from 22 December 1991 to 6 January 1992.

Map showing the Russian Federation in light red with Russian-occupied territories in Europe in dark red, as follows:
1. Transnistria (since 1992)
2. Abkhazia (since 1992)
3. South Ossetia (since 2008)
4. Crimea (since 2014)
5. Luhansk People's Republic (since 2014)
6. Donetsk People's Republic (since 2014)
The map does not include other Ukrainian territories occupied by Russia in 2022 or the Kuril Islands disputed with Japan.

Russian-occupied territories

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Russian-occupied territories are the lands outside of Russia's internationally recognized borders which have been designated by the United Nations and most of the international community as under a Russian military occupation.

Russian-occupied territories are the lands outside of Russia's internationally recognized borders which have been designated by the United Nations and most of the international community as under a Russian military occupation.

Map showing the Russian Federation in light red with Russian-occupied territories in Europe in dark red, as follows:
1. Transnistria (since 1992)
2. Abkhazia (since 1992)
3. South Ossetia (since 2008)
4. Crimea (since 2014)
5. Luhansk People's Republic (since 2014)
6. Donetsk People's Republic (since 2014)
The map does not include other Ukrainian territories occupied by Russia in 2022 or the Kuril Islands disputed with Japan.
Disputed islands in question: Habomai Islands, Shikotan, Kunashiri (Kunashir) and Etorofu (Iturup).

They consist of the territories of Transnistria (part of Moldova), Abkhazia and South Ossetia (both part of Georgia), and some parts of Ukraine.

Guaramid dynasty

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The Guaramid Dynasty or Guaramiani (გუარამიანი) was the younger branch of the Chosroid royal house of Iberia (Kartli, eastern Georgia).

Bidzina Ivanishvili

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Ivanishvili in 2013
Ivanishvili's residence in Tbilisi, designed by Shin Takamatsu.
Ivanishvili's business center and residence
Ivanishvili in the Polish Senate, 2013
Ivanishvili (on right) with Irakli Kobakhidze, 2020

Bidzina Ivanishvili (ბიძინა ივანიშვილი, also known as Boris Grigoryevich Ivanishvili; born 18 February 1956) is a Georgian politician, billionaire businessman and philanthropist, who served as Prime Minister of Georgia from October 2012 to November 2013.

Afsharid Iran

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Iranian empire established by the Turkoman Afshar tribe in Iran's north-eastern province of Khorasan, ruling Iran .

Iranian empire established by the Turkoman Afshar tribe in Iran's north-eastern province of Khorasan, ruling Iran .

The Afsharid Empire at its greatest extent in 1741–1745 under Nader Shah
Painting of Nader Shah
The Afsharid Empire at its greatest extent in 1741–1745 under Nader Shah
The flank march of Nader's army at Battle of Khyber pass has been called a "military masterpiece" by the Russian general & historian Kursinski
At the Battle of Karnal, Nader crushed an enormous Mughal army six times greater than his own
Afsharid forces negotiate with a Mughal Nawab.
Silver coin of Nader Shah, minted in Dagestan, dated 1741/2 (left = obverse; right = reverse)
The Battle of Kars (1745) was the last major field battle Nader fought in his spectacular military career
Map of Iran during the collapse of the Afsharid Empire
The Afsharid dynasty near its end, as its authority is reduced to Mashhad and the surrounding territory

At its height it controlled modern-day Iran, Armenia, Georgia, Azerbaijan Republic, parts of the North Caucasus (Dagestan), Afghanistan, Bahrain, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Pakistan, and parts of Iraq, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and Oman.

Zurab Zhvania

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Zhvania addresses an opposition rally during the Rose Revolution, November 2003.

Zurab Zhvania (ზურაბ ჟვანია; 9 December 1963 – 3 February 2005) was a Georgian politician, who served as Prime Minister of Georgia and Speaker of the Parliament of Georgia.

United National Movement (Georgia)

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A pro-NATO sign edited by UNM, the then-ruling party of Georgia.

United National Movement (ერთიანი ნაციონალური მოძრაობა, Ertiani Natsionaluri Modzraoba, ENM) is a liberal and pro-western political party in Georgia founded by Mikheil Saakashvili which rose to power following the Rose Revolution.

Map outlining the territory of Eastern Georgia

Eastern Georgia (country)

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Map outlining the territory of Eastern Georgia

Eastern Georgia (აღმოსავლეთ საქართველო, aghmosavlet' sak'art'velo) is a geographic area encompassing the territory of the Caucasian nation of Georgia to the east and south of the Likhi and Meskheti Ranges, but excluding the Black Sea region of Adjara.