A report on Georgia (country)

"Gorgania" i.e. Georgia on Fra Mauro map
Patera depicting Marcus Aurelius uncovered in central Georgia, 2nd century AD
Northwestern Georgia is home to the medieval defensive Svan towers of Ushguli
Gelati Monastery, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Queen Tamar, the first woman to rule medieval Georgia in her own right.
King Vakhtang VI, a Georgian monarch caught between rival regional powers
The reign of George XII was marked by instability.
Noe Zhordania, Prime Minister of Georgia who was exiled to France after the Soviet takeover
The Bolshevik Red Army in Tbilisi on 25 February 1921. Saint David's church on the Holy Mountain is visible in the distance.
Georgian Civil War and the War in Abkhazia in August–October 1993
The Rose Revolution, 2003
US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice holding a joint press conference with Georgian president Mikheil Saakashvili during the Russo-Georgian war
Salome Zourabichvili, the first woman elected as president of Georgia
Presidential residence at the Orbeliani Palace in Tbilisi
Pro-NATO poster in Tbilisi
President of Georgia Salome Zourabichvili, President of Moldova Maia Sandu, President of Ukraine Volodymyr Zelensky and President of the European Council Charles Michel during the 2021 Batumi International Conference. In 2014, the EU signed Association Agreements with all the three states.
Georgian built Didgori-2 during the military parade in 2011
A Ford Taurus Police Interceptor operated by the Georgian Patrol Police.
Map of Georgia highlighting the disputed territories of Abkhazia and Tskhinvali Region (South Ossetia), both of which are outside the control of the central government of Georgia
Köppen climate classification map of Georgia
Mount Kazbek in eastern Georgia
Svaneti region of Georgia
View of the cave city of Vardzia and the valley of the Kura River below
Georgia's diverse climate creates varied landscapes, like these flat marshlands in the country's west
Southwest Georgia has a subtropical climate, with frequent rain and thick green vegetation
Georgian Shepherd Dog
GDP per capita development since 1973
A proportional representation of Georgia's exports in 2019
One of several plants operated by HeidelbergCement in Georgia
Wine-making is a traditional component of the Georgian economy.
The most visited ski resort of Georgia, Gudauri
The Georgian Railways represent a vital artery linking the Black Sea and Caspian Sea – the shortest route between Europe and Central Asia.
Port of Batumi
Ethno-linguistic groups in the Caucasus region
Tbilisi State University, Corpus I
Illuminated manuscript from medieval Georgia, showing a scene from nativity
Old Tbilisi – Architecture in Georgia is in many ways a fusion of European and Asian.
Rather than serving food in courses, traditional supras often present all that a host has to offer
Château Mukhrani, one of the centres of Georgia's viticulture in the 19th century, has recently been restored to produce its eponymous wine.
Dinamo Tbilisi, winner of 1981 European Cup Winners' Cup on stamp of Georgia, 2002
Château Mukhrani, one of the centres of Georgia's viticulture in the 19th century, has recently been restored to produce its eponymous wine.

Country located in the Caucasus, at the intersection of Eastern Europe and Western Asia, identifying itself as European.

- Georgia (country)

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Georgia–Russia relations

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Georgia and Russia have had no formal diplomatic relations since August 2008, largely due to the Russo-Georgian War and Russian recognition of separatist regions.

Georgia and Russia have had no formal diplomatic relations since August 2008, largely due to the Russo-Georgian War and Russian recognition of separatist regions.

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Russia has supported separatist movements in Abkhazia and South Ossetia since the early 1990s. This is arguably the greatest problem of Georgian–Russian relations
Vladimir Putin with Mikheil Saakashvili in 2006
The Georgia–Russia border zone at Upper Lars has been closed since 2006
Restricted Weapons Zone
Russian military bases in Tskhinvali Region as of 2015
Protest sign in Tbilisi reads "Russia is an occupant".

Bilateral relations between Georgia and Russia date back hundreds of years and remain complicated despite certain religious and historical ties that exist between the two countries and their people.

Northwestern Iran's borders before and after the treaty

Treaty of Gulistan

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Peace treaty concluded between the Russian Empire and Iran on 24 October 1813 in the village of Gulistan (now in the Goranboy District of Azerbaijan) as a result of the first full-scale Russo-Persian War, (1804 to 1813).

Peace treaty concluded between the Russian Empire and Iran on 24 October 1813 in the village of Gulistan (now in the Goranboy District of Azerbaijan) as a result of the first full-scale Russo-Persian War, (1804 to 1813).

Northwestern Iran's borders before and after the treaty
Persia in 1808 according to a British map before its losses to Russia in the north by the 1813 Treaty of Gulistan and the loss of Herat to Britain by the Treaty of Paris (1857)
South Caucasus after Treaty of Gulistan

The treaty confirmed the ceding and inclusion of what is now Dagestan, eastern Georgia, most of the Republic of Azerbaijan and parts of northern Armenia from Iran into the Russian Empire.

Bahram Mirza

Qajar dynasty

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Iranian royal dynasty of Turkic origin, specifically from the Qajar tribe, ruling over Iran from 1789 to 1925.

Iranian royal dynasty of Turkic origin, specifically from the Qajar tribe, ruling over Iran from 1789 to 1925.

Bahram Mirza
Feyzullah Mirza Qajar

In the Caucasus, the Qajar dynasty permanently lost many of Iran's integral areas to the Russians over the course of the 19th century, comprising modern-day eastern Georgia, Dagestan, Azerbaijan and Armenia.

Qajar Iran

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Iranian state ruled by the Qajar dynasty, which was of Turkic origin, specifically from the Qajar tribe, from 1789 to 1925.

Iranian state ruled by the Qajar dynasty, which was of Turkic origin, specifically from the Qajar tribe, from 1789 to 1925.

Map of Iran under the Qajar dynasty in the 19th century.
The capture of Tbilisi by Agha Muhammad Khan. A Qajar-era Persian miniature from the British Library.
Map of Iran under the Qajar dynasty in the 19th century.
Map showing Irans's northwestern borders in the 19th century, comprising Eastern Georgia, Dagestan, Armenia, and Azerbaijan, before being forced to cede the territories to Imperial Russia per the two Russo-Persian Wars of the 19th century
A. Sharlmann "Battle of Ganja" during the Russo-Persian War (1804-1813)
Mullahs in the royal presence. The painting style is distinctly Qajar.
A Zoroastrian family in Qajar Iran
A former Persian Legation in Washington, D.C.
Qajar-era currency bill featuring a depiction of Nasser al-Din Shah Qajar.
Mozaffar al-Din Shah and Attendants Seated in a Garden One of 274 vintage photographs (Brooklyn Museum)
Persian Cossack Brigade in Tabriz in 1909
Painting of a woman in Qajar Iran.
Battle of Sultanabad, 13 February 1812. State Hermitage Museum.
Storming of Lankaran, 13 January 1813. Franz Roubaud.

In the Caucasus, the Qajar dynasty permanently lost many of Iran's integral areas to the Russian Empire over the course of the 19th century, comprising modern-day eastern Georgia, Dagestan, Azerbaijan and Armenia.

Qara Qoyunlu Turkomans, lighter blue shows their greatest extent in Iraq and Arabian East Coast for a small period of time

Qara Qoyunlu

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Qara Qoyunlu Turkomans, lighter blue shows their greatest extent in Iraq and Arabian East Coast for a small period of time
Qara Yusif in the battle of Kura coast with Shirvanshahs, 1412.
Qara Qoyunlu miniature of the XV century. New York, Metropolitan Museum.
Mausoleum of Turkmen emirs, 1838
Graveyard in Argavand, fragment in Arabic
Blue Mosque, Tabriz

The Qara Qoyunlu or Kara Koyunlu (, Qaraqoyunlular قاراقویونلولار‎), also known as the Black Sheep Turkomans, were a Persianate Muslim Turkoman monarchy that ruled over the territory comprising present-day Azerbaijan, Georgia, Armenia, northwestern Iran, eastern Turkey, and northeastern Iraq from about 1374 to 1468.

Zand dynasty

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Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand ((r.

Iranian dynasty, founded by Karim Khan Zand ((r.

The Zand dynasty at its zenith under Karim Khan in 1776. Autonomous areas are shown in light green. Present day state boundaries overlaid in red for comparison.
Contemporary portrait of Karim Khan Zand, the founder of the dynasty (1751).
The Zand dynasty at its zenith under Karim Khan in 1776. Autonomous areas are shown in light green. Present day state boundaries overlaid in red for comparison.
Map of Iran in January 1756
Vakeel mosque, Shiraz.

The lands of present-day Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia were controlled by khanates which were de jure part of the Zand realm, but the region was de facto autonomous.

List of historical states of Georgia

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This is an incomplete list of states that have existed on the present-day territory of Georgia since ancient times.

Adarnase IV of Iberia

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Adarnase IV (ადარნასე) (died 923) was a member of the Georgian Bagratid dynasty of Tao-Klarjeti and prince of Iberia, responsible for the restoration of the Iberian kingship, which had been in abeyance since it had been abolished by Sasanian Empire in the 6th century, in 888.

alt=Panorama of Tbilisi|Old Town of Tbilisi, capital and largest city in Georgia

List of cities and towns in Georgia (country)

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alt=Panorama of Tbilisi|Old Town of Tbilisi, capital and largest city in Georgia
alt=Coastline of Batumi|Batumi, the second largest city in Georgia
alt=Downtown Kutaisi|Kutaisi, Georgia's third largest city.
Square in Rustavi, Georgia's fourth largest city

The following list of Georgian cities is divided into three lists for Georgia itself, and the disputed territories of Abkhazia and South Ossetia.

Treaty of Poti

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Bilateral agreement between the German Empire and the Democratic Republic of Georgia in which the latter accepted German protection and recognition.

Bilateral agreement between the German Empire and the Democratic Republic of Georgia in which the latter accepted German protection and recognition.

Concluded at the Georgian Black Sea port of Poti, the treaty came only two days after Georgia proclaimed independence, becoming the newly independent republic's first-ever international treaty.