German Americans

GermanGerman-AmericanGerman AmericanGerman immigrantsGermansGerman immigrantGerman-AmericansGerman descentGerman ancestryGerman-born American
German Americans (Deutschamerikaner, ) are Americans who have full or partial German ancestry.wikipedia
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Shenandoah Germans

Shenandoah ValleydescendantGerman immigrant
Large sections of Pennsylvania, Upstate New York, and the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia attracted Germans.
The Shenandoah Valley region of Virginia and neighboring parts of West Virginia is home to a long-established German-American community dating back to the 17th century.

Milwaukee

Milwaukee, WisconsinMilwaukee, WICity of Milwaukee
There are major annual events in cities with German heritage including Chicago, Cincinnati, Milwaukee, Pittsburgh, San Antonio, and St. Louis.
Scholars classify German immigration to the United States in three major waves, and Wisconsin received a significant number of immigrants from all three.

German-American Day

German American Heritage MonthGerman DayGerman-American Day, 2001
Oktoberfest celebrations and the German-American Day are popular festivities.
German-American Day, which celebrates German-American heritage, commemorates the date in 1683 when 13 German families from Krefeld, near the Rhine, landed in Philadelphia aboard the.

North Carolina

NCNorthState of North Carolina
In North Carolina, German Moravians living around Bethlehem, Pennsylvania purchased nearly 100000 acre from Lord Granville (one of the British Lords Proprietor) in the Piedmont of North Carolina in 1753.
Growth was strong in the middle of the 18th century, as the economy attracted Scots-Irish, Quaker, English and German immigrants.

Pennsylvania

PACommonwealth of PennsylvaniaPa.
Large sections of Pennsylvania, Upstate New York, and the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia attracted Germans. In the 1670s, the first significant groups of German immigrants arrived in the British colonies, settling primarily in Pennsylvania, New York, and Virginia.

Upstate New York

upstateNew YorkUpstate, New York
Large sections of Pennsylvania, Upstate New York, and the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia attracted Germans.
Residents of English colonial ancestry are common, as well as German, Irish, and Italian, with most metropolitan counties having a similar number of residents from each group.

Union Army

UnionUnion troopsUnion forces
With their skills, they made wagons that carried the frontiersmen westward; their cannons provided the Union Army with artillery in the American Civil War, and their automobile company became one of the largest in America, although never eclipsing the "Big Three", and was a factor in the war effort and in the industrial foundations of the Army. A popular Union commander among Germans, Major General Franz Sigel was the highest-ranking German officer in the Union Army, with many German immigrants claiming to enlist to "fight mit Sigel".
Over 10,000 Germans in New York and Pennsylvania immediately responded to Lincoln's call, and the French were also quick to volunteer.

Loyalist (American Revolution)

LoyalistLoyalistsTories
Despite this, many of the German settlers were loyalists during the Revolution, possibly because they feared their royal land grants would be taken away by a new republican government, or because of loyalty to a British German monarchy who had provided the opportunity to live in a liberal society.
The Germans in Pennsylvania tried to stay out of the Revolution, just as many Quakers did, and when that failed, clung to the familiar connection rather than embrace the new.

Carl Schurz

Schurz, CarlCarl ShurzGeneral Schurz
Prominent Forty-Eighters included Carl Schurz and Henry Villard.
After the war, Schurz established a newspaper in St. Louis, Missouri, and won election to the U.S. Senate, becoming the first German-born American elected to that body.

History of the Germans in Baltimore

GermanGerman-AmericanGermans
The port cities of New York, and Baltimore had large populations.
German immigrants began to settle along the Chesapeake Bay by 1723, living in the area that became Baltimore when the city was established in 1729.

Franz Sigel

SigelGen. Franz SigelGen. Sigel
A popular Union commander among Germans, Major General Franz Sigel was the highest-ranking German officer in the Union Army, with many German immigrants claiming to enlist to "fight mit Sigel".
Franz Sigel (November 18, 1824 – August 21, 1902) was a German American military officer, revolutionist and immigrant to the United States who was a teacher, newspaperman, politician, and served as a Union major general in the American Civil War.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
The first permanent German settlement in what became the United States was Germantown, Pennsylvania, founded near Philadelphia on October 6, 1683.
The five largest European ancestries reported in the 2010 Census included Irish (13.0%), Italian (8.3%), German (8.2%), Polish (3.9%), and English (3.1%).

Hermann Raster

Notable Forty-Eighter Hermann Raster wrote passionately against slavery and was very pro-Lincoln.
Hermann Raster (May 6, 1827 – July 24, 1891) was a German American Forty-Eighter, editor, abolitionist, and Republican political boss best known for his career as chief editor and part-owner of the Illinois Staats-Zeitung between 1867 and 1891 and his term as Collector of Internal Revenue for the 1st District of Illinois.

Dutchtown, St. Louis

Dutchtown
Many concentrations acquired distinctive names suggesting their heritage, such as the "Over-the-Rhine" district in Cincinnati, "Dutchtown" in South St Louis, and "German Village" in Columbus, Ohio.
It is called "Dutch" from Deutsch, i.e., "German", as it was the southern center of German-American settlement in St. Louis in the early 19th century.

Belleville, Illinois

BellevilleBelleville, ILBelleville Township
A prominent representative of this generation of immigrants was Gustav Koerner who lived most of the time in Belleville, Illinois until his death.
Major immigration in the mid-19th century to this area occurred following revolutions in Germany, and most of the European-American population is of German ancestry.

Minnesota

MNState of MinnesotaMinnesota, USA
A Minnesota minister was tarred and feathered when he was overheard praying in German with a dying woman.
During the 19th and early 20th centuries, many European immigrants, mainly from Scandinavia and Germany, began to settle the state, which remains a center of Scandinavian American and German American culture.

Fort Wayne, Indiana

Fort WayneFort Wayne, INFt. Wayne, Indiana
In many other cities of the Midwest, such as Fort Wayne, Indiana, German Americans were at least 30% of the population.
At the turn of the 20th century, the city's population reached nearly 50,000, attributed to a large influx of German and Irish immigrants.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
The port cities of New York, and Baltimore had large populations. German-American societies abound, as do celebrations that are held throughout the country to celebrate German heritage of which the German-American Steuben Parade in New York City is one of the most well-known and is held every third Saturday in September.
By 1900, Germans constituted the largest immigrant group, followed by the Irish, Jews, and Italians.

German American Bund

German-American BundNazism in the United StatesBundist
About 25,000 people became paying members of the pro-Nazi German American Bund during the years before the war.
The German American Bund, or German American Federation (Amerikadeutscher Bund; Amerikadeutscher Volksbund, AV), was a German-American pro-Nazi organization established in 1936 to succeed Friends of New Germany (FoNG), the new name being chosen to emphasize the group's American credentials after press criticism that the organization was unpatriotic.

Lutheranism

LutheranEvangelical LutheranLutherans
Most were Lutheran or German Reformed; many belonged to small religious sects such as the Moravians and Mennonites.
Neo-Lutheran Johann Konrad Wilhelm Löhe and Old Lutheran free church leader Friedrich August Brünn both sent young men overseas to serve as pastors to German Americans, while the Inner Mission focused on renewing the situation home.

Dreissiger

Dreißiger
"Latin farmer" or Latin Settlement is the designation of several settlements founded by some of the Dreissiger and other refugees from Europe after rebellions like the Frankfurter Wachensturm beginning in the 1830s—predominantly in Texas and Missouri, but also in other US states—in which German intellectuals (freethinkers, Freidenker, and Latinists) met together to devote themselves to the German literature, philosophy, science, classical music, and the Latin language.
In a broader sense, it refers to immigrants from across Germany, and including members of every social and economic class, who immigrated to the US during this period.

Hyphenated American

AmericanHyphenated Americanshyphenated-Americans
Former president Theodore Roosevelt denounced "hyphenated Americanism", insisting that dual loyalties were impossible in wartime.
It was most commonly directed at German Americans or Irish Americans (Catholics) who called for U.S. neutrality in World War I.

Germans

Germanethnic Germanethnic Germans
German Americans (Deutschamerikaner, ) are Americans who have full or partial German ancestry.
There are an additional 80 million people of German ancestry mainly in the United States, Brazil (mainly in the South Region of the country), Argentina, Canada, South Africa, the post-Soviet states (mainly in Russia and Kazakhstan), and France, each accounting for at least 1 million.

New York (state)

New YorkNew York StateNY
In the 1670s, the first significant groups of German immigrants arrived in the British colonies, settling primarily in Pennsylvania, New York, and Virginia.
According to the 2010–2015 American Community Survey, the largest ancestry groups were Italian (13.0%), Irish (12.1%), German (10.3%), American (5.4%), and English (5.2%).

Latin Settlement

Latin farmerLatin FarmersLatin settlements
"Latin farmer" or Latin Settlement is the designation of several settlements founded by some of the Dreissiger and other refugees from Europe after rebellions like the Frankfurter Wachensturm beginning in the 1830s—predominantly in Texas and Missouri, but also in other US states—in which German intellectuals (freethinkers, Freidenker, and Latinists) met together to devote themselves to the German literature, philosophy, science, classical music, and the Latin language.
On his journey to Texas in 1867, German-American author Friedrich Kapp met a former university friend of his, who explained his situation to him thus: "I am not happy in the true sense of the word, but neither I am unhappy, for I live freely and without coercion. I do not depend on anything except on my oxen and on the weather. There is nothing hindering me in expressing my revolutionary thoughts, except that there is no one listening to me."