German National People's Party

DNVPDeutschnationale VolksparteiGerman National People's Party (DNVP)National People's PartyGerman NationalNationalistsNational People's Party (''"Deutschnationale Volkspartei"'' / DNVP)German National PartyGerman National People's Party (''Deutschnationale Volkspartei'' / DNVP)German nationalist
The German National People's Party (Deutschnationale Volkspartei, DNVP) was a national-conservative party in Germany during the time of the Weimar Republic.wikipedia
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Alfred Hugenberg

HugenbergHugenberg PressDr. Alfred Hugenberg
Under the leadership of the populist media entrepreneur Alfred Hugenberg from 1928, the party reclaimed its reactionary nationalist and anti-republican rhetoric and changed its strategy to mass mobilisation, plebiscites and support of authoritarian rule by the President instead of work by parliamentary means.
As leader of the German National People's Party he was instrumental in helping Adolf Hitler become Chancellor of Germany and served in his first cabinet in 1933, hoping to control Hitler and use him as his "tool."

Harzburg Front

Harzburger Front
After 1929, the DNVP co-operated with the Nazis, joining forces in the Harzburg Front of 1931, forming coalition governments in some states and finally supporting Hitler's appointment as Chancellor (Reichskanzler) in January 1933.
It was a coalition of the national conservative German National People's Party (DNVP) under millionaire press-baron Alfred Hugenberg with Adolf Hitler's Nazi Party (NSDAP), the leadership of the Stahlhelm paramilitary veterans' association, the Agricultural League and the Pan-German League organizations.

December 1924 German federal election

December 1924December 1924 electionDecember 1924 elections
It broadened its voting base—winning as many as 20.5% in the December 1924 election—and supported the election of Paul von Hindenburg as President of Germany (Reichspräsident) in 1925.

Carl Friedrich Goerdeler

Carl GoerdelerGoerdelerKarl Goerdeler
During the Second World War, several prominent former DNVP members, such as Carl Friedrich Goerdeler, were involved in the German resistance against the Nazis and took part in the 20 July assassination plot against Hitler in 1944.
After his discharge from the German Army, Goerdeler joined the ultraconservative German National People's Party (DNVP).

Monarchism

monarchistmonarchistsroyalist
It was an alliance of nationalists, reactionary monarchists, völkisch and antisemitic elements supported by the Pan-German League.
In 1920s Germany a number of monarchists gathered around the German National People's Party which demanded the return of the Hohenzollern monarchy and an end to the Weimar Republic; the party retained a large base of support until the rise of Nazism in the 1930s.

Adolf Hitler

HitlerFührerthe leader
At the same time, it lost many votes to Adolf Hitler's rising Nazi Party.
Hitler headed a short-lived coalition government formed by the NSDAP (which had the most seats in the Reichstag) and Hugenberg's party, the German National People's Party (DNVP).

Antisemitism

anti-Semitismanti-Semiticantisemitic
It was an alliance of nationalists, reactionary monarchists, völkisch and antisemitic elements supported by the Pan-German League.
This party always remained small, and its support dwindled after Stoecker's death, with most of its members eventually joining larger conservative groups such as the German National People's Party.

Siegfried von Kardorff

At the founding convention in December 1918, Siegfried von Kardorff gave the keynote speech, in which he stated "Our new party, in which friendly right-wing parties have united, has no past and rejects any responsibility for the past. We have a present, and God willing, a good future", to which the delegates shouted "But without the Jews!"
Describing himself as a "left-wing Free Conservative", Kardorff helped found the German National People's Party.

May 1924 German federal election

May 1924general election of May 1924May 1924 elections
In the Reichstag election of 4 May 1924, the DNVP posted its best showing yet, winning 19% of the vote.

Ulrich von Hassell

The task of writing out a common platform acceptable to all fell to a committee headed by Ulrich von Hassell.
After the war ended in 1918, Hassell joined the nationalist German National People's Party (Deutschnationale Volkspartei or DNVP).

Weimar Republic

GermanyWeimar GermanyWeimar
The German National People's Party (Deutschnationale Volkspartei, DNVP) was a national-conservative party in Germany during the time of the Weimar Republic.
On 18 July, as a result of opposition from the SPD, KPD, DNVP and the small contingent of NSDAP members, the Reichstag again rejected the bill by a slim margin.

Reinhold Wulle

WULLE, Reinhold
Despite Kube's best efforts to work out a compromise, the leading völkisch activists' Wilhelm Henning, Reinhold Wulle and Albrecht von Graefe all resigned from the party in October 1922 when the party's leader Oskar Hergt supported by Otto Hoetzsch and Count Kuno von Westarp made it clear that they wanted no more calls for assassinations, which had caused a major public relations problem.
However this group proved short-lived as it was absorbed into the German National People's Party (DNVP) in June of the same year.

Wilhelm Henning

Despite Kube's best efforts to work out a compromise, the leading völkisch activists' Wilhelm Henning, Reinhold Wulle and Albrecht von Graefe all resigned from the party in October 1922 when the party's leader Oskar Hergt supported by Otto Hoetzsch and Count Kuno von Westarp made it clear that they wanted no more calls for assassinations, which had caused a major public relations problem. In an article by Wilhelm Henning, it was claimed Rathenau was somehow involved with the assassination of Count Wilhelm von Mirbach, the German ambassador to the Soviet Union in 1918, and that the fact that Rathenau did not mention Mirbach's assassination during his visit to the Soviet Union in April 1922 being presented as proof that Rathenau had a hand in Mirbach's death.
Entering politics, Henning joined the conservative German National People's Party (DNVP) and was elected to the Reichstag in 1920.

Agricultural League

LandbundReichslandbundRLB
Initially, the DNVP had promised to vote against the Dawes Plan when it came up for ratification in the Reichstag on the grounds that Germany should not have to pay any reparations at all, resulting in many of the economic lobbying groups that donated to the party such as the Landbund, the Reich Association of German Industry (RDI) and the Chamber of Industry and Commerce threatening to cease donating to the party forever if its MPs voted against the Dawes Plan. The political repercussion of rural rage was the rise of a number of small parties representing rural voters in northern Germany such as the Agricultural League, German Farmers' Party and the Christian-National Peasants' and Farmers' Party, which all took away traditional DNVP voters, a development that contributed significantly to DNVP's poor showing in the 1928 elections.
It was led by landowners with property east of the Elbe and was allied with the German National People's Party.

Kapp Putsch

Kapp-Lüttwitz PutschKapp-PutschKapp-Lüttwitz-Putsch
In the run-up to the Kapp Putsch of March 1920, the DNVP leaders were informed by Wolfgang Kapp in February 1920 that a putsch to overthrow the government would soon occur, and asked for their support.
These included German National People's Party (DNVP) member Wolfgang Kapp, retired general Erich Ludendorff and Waldemar Pabst, who had been behind the murder of Karl Liebknecht and Rosa Luxemburg in January 1919 and, the last Berlin head of police in the old Reich.

Centre Party (Germany)

Centre PartyZentrumCentre
The target of the pamphlet was Matthias Erzberger of the Zentrum, whom Hellferich called "the puppet of the Jews", and called openly for his assassination to avenge his "crimes" such as signing the armistice ending World War I. Helfferich wrote that Erzberger's career was "a sordid mixing of political activity with his own pecuniary advantage... at the crucial moment of the war, acting for his Habsburg-Bourbon patrons, he cowardly attacked German policy from the rear with his July action, and thereby destroyed in the German people the belief in and therefore the will to victory" [By "July action" Helfereich was referring to the Reichstag Peace Resolution of July 1917, which Erzberger played a major role in writing].
In January 1925 the non-affiliated Hans Luther was appointed chancellor and formed a coalition between the Centre, both Liberal parties, the BVP and, for the first time, the right-wing German National People's Party (DNVP).

German nationalism

German nationalistGerman nationalistsnationalist
It was an alliance of nationalists, reactionary monarchists, völkisch and antisemitic elements supported by the Pan-German League.

Oskar Hergt

Despite Kube's best efforts to work out a compromise, the leading völkisch activists' Wilhelm Henning, Reinhold Wulle and Albrecht von Graefe all resigned from the party in October 1922 when the party's leader Oskar Hergt supported by Otto Hoetzsch and Count Kuno von Westarp made it clear that they wanted no more calls for assassinations, which had caused a major public relations problem. There was much disagreement about who was to lead the new party, and Oskar Hergt was chosen as leader on 19 December 1918 very much as the compromise candidate, being a little-known civil servant who was thereforth acceptable to all the factions.
Previously a member of the FKP, which was dissolved after the First World War, Hergt was a founding member of the right-wing monarchist DNVP and the first party chairman.

German Revolution of 1918–1919

German RevolutionGerman Revolution of 1918–19November Revolution
It was formed in late 1918 after Germany's defeat in World War I and the November Revolution that toppled the German monarchy.
Aside from SPD and USPD, the Catholic Centre Party took part, and so did several middle-class parties that had established themselves since November: the left-liberal German Democratic Party (DDP), the national-liberal German People's Party (DVP) and the conservative, nationalist German National People's Party (DNVP).

1919 German federal election

1919electionselected
In the elections on 19 January 1919 for the National Assembly that was to write the new constitution, the DNVP produced a pamphlet entitled "The Jews—Germany's vampires!"

Gustav Stresemann

StresemannDr. Gustav StresemannForeign Minister Stresemann
In September 1923 when the DVP Chancellor Gustav Stresemann announced the end of "passive resistance" and the occupation of the Ruhr (Ruhrkampf) under the grounds that hyperinflation had destroyed the economy and the Ruhrkampf must end in order to save Germany, the DNVP found itself joining forces with the Communist Party of Germany (KPD) in denouncing the end of the Ruhrkampf as treason and as a cowardly surrender to "a half-sated irreconcilable France".
The DVP was initially seen, along with the German National People's Party, as part of the "national opposition" to the Weimar Republic, particularly for its grudging acceptance of democracy and its ambivalent attitude towards the Freikorps and the Kapp Putsch in 1920.

Karl Helfferich

Typical of the party's views about Weimar was a 1919 pamphlet by Karl Helfferich entitled "Erzberger Must Go!", which was in equal terms violently anti-democratic, anti-Catholic and anti-Semitic.
Helfferich was a prominent politician of the German National People's Party (DNVP) and gave radical antirepublican speeches against politicians who supported reparations fulfilment.

National conservatism

national conservativenational-conservativenational conservatives
The German National People's Party (Deutschnationale Volkspartei, DNVP) was a national-conservative party in Germany during the time of the Weimar Republic.

Albrecht von Graefe (politician)

Albrecht von Graefe
Despite Kube's best efforts to work out a compromise, the leading völkisch activists' Wilhelm Henning, Reinhold Wulle and Albrecht von Graefe all resigned from the party in October 1922 when the party's leader Oskar Hergt supported by Otto Hoetzsch and Count Kuno von Westarp made it clear that they wanted no more calls for assassinations, which had caused a major public relations problem.
Von Graefe returned to the Reichstag in 1920 as member of the German National People's Party (DNVP).

Christian-National Peasants' and Farmers' Party

Christlich-Nationale Bauern- und LandvolkparteiCNBLBauern
The political repercussion of rural rage was the rise of a number of small parties representing rural voters in northern Germany such as the Agricultural League, German Farmers' Party and the Christian-National Peasants' and Farmers' Party, which all took away traditional DNVP voters, a development that contributed significantly to DNVP's poor showing in the 1928 elections.
It developed from the German National People's Party (DNVP) in 1928.