German orthography reform of 1996

German spelling reform of 1996German spelling reform1996 spelling reformmoderncontentious spelling reformsGerman orthography reformGerman orthography reform of 1996 – legal statusGerman spelling reform(s)in 1996modern spelling
The German orthography reform of 1996 (Reform der deutschen Rechtschreibung von 1996) was a change to German spelling and punctuation that was intended to simplify German orthography and thus to make it easier to learn, without substantially changing the rules familiar to users of the language.wikipedia
97 Related Articles

Council for German Orthography

Rat für deutsche RechtschreibungEmpfehlungen des Rats für Deutsche Rechtschreibung
In March 2006, the Council for German Orthography agreed unanimously to remove the most controversial changes from the reform; this was largely, though not completely, accepted by media organizations such as the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung that had previously opposed the reform.
With its seat being in Mannheim, Germany, the RdR was formed in 2004 as a successor to the Zwischenstaatliche Kommission für deutsche Rechtschreibung ("Intergovernmental Commission for German Orthography") in order to include both supporters and opponents of the German orthography reform of 1996 (and subsequent reforms).

German language

GermanGerman-languageGerman-speaking
In the closing remarks from the first of these meetings, capitalisation reform was put off to a future "second phase" of German language reform attempts, since no consensus had been reached.
Official revisions of some of the rules from 1901 were not issued until the controversial German orthography reform of 1996 was made the official standard by governments of all German-speaking countries.

Spelling reform

orthographic reformsimplified spellingreform the spelling
Recent high-profile examples are the German orthography reform of 1996 and the on-off Portuguese spelling reform of 1990, which is still being ratified by the different countries.

German orthography

German alphabetGermanGerman spelling
The German orthography reform of 1996 (Reform der deutschen Rechtschreibung von 1996) was a change to German spelling and punctuation that was intended to simplify German orthography and thus to make it easier to learn, without substantially changing the rules familiar to users of the language.
The German spelling reform of 1996 somewhat reduced usage of this letter in Germany and Austria.

Binnen-I

Like French, Spanish, and other languages, but unlike English, the German language has a language academy, the Rat für deutsche Rechtschreibung (Council for German Orthography) that watches over the language, and prescribes spelling and usage in official dictionaries and usage guides, and publishes occasional reforms to the standards like the 1996 spelling reform.

Kultusministerkonferenz

Conference of Ministers of EducationStanding Conference of the Ministers of Education and Cultural Affairsconference of all the states ministers for school education
However, this report was rejected by the Conference of Ministers of Education in March 2004.

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung

FAZFrankfurter AllgemeineFrankfurter Allgemeine Sonntagszeitung
After having introduced on 1 August 1999 the new spelling prescribed by the German spelling reform, the F.A.Z. returned exactly one year later to the old spelling, declaring that the reform had failed to achieve the primary goals of improving language mastery and strengthening the unity of the language.

Duden

Duden HandbookDuden dictionaryDuden Schulbuch
The editors of the Duden dictionaries also agreed that many of the problems in the traditional spelling system were due to the "arcane rules" that had been fabricated to explain the system, thus lending their support to the new spelling system, which they said was and is more logical.
The "current official rules" are the result of the German orthography reform of 1996.

German orthography reform of 1944

reform of the orthography
Some of the proposed changes, such as the comma before the conjunction und becoming optional and the hyphenation changes, were included in the German spelling reform of 1996.

German Orthographic Conference of 1901

1902 spelling reformspelling reform in 1901general spelling reform
It was not until 95 years later that the German spelling was changed with a reform in 1996.

List of territorial entities where German is an official language

German-speaking countriesGerman speaking countriesGerman-speaking Europe
The reform was based on an international agreement signed in Vienna in July 1996 by the governments of the German-speaking countries—Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein and Switzerland.

Germany

GermanGERFederal Republic of Germany
The reform was based on an international agreement signed in Vienna in July 1996 by the governments of the German-speaking countries—Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein and Switzerland.

Austria

AUTAustrianRepublic of Austria
The reform was based on an international agreement signed in Vienna in July 1996 by the governments of the German-speaking countries—Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein and Switzerland.

Liechtenstein

Principality of LiechtensteinLIEFürstentum Liechtenstein
The reform was based on an international agreement signed in Vienna in July 1996 by the governments of the German-speaking countries—Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein and Switzerland.

Switzerland

SwissSwiss ConfederationSWI
The reform was based on an international agreement signed in Vienna in July 1996 by the governments of the German-speaking countries—Germany, Austria, Liechtenstein and Switzerland.

Luxembourg

Grand Duchy of LuxembourgLUXLuxemburg
Luxembourg did not participate despite having German as one of its three official languages: it regards itself "as a non-German-speaking country not to be a contributory determinant upon the German system of spelling", though it did eventually adopt the reform.

Orthography

orthographicorthographiesorthographically
The reformed orthography became obligatory in schools and in public administration.

Loanword

loanwordsloan wordborrowed
The rules of the new spelling concern the following areas: correspondence between sounds and written letters (this includes rules for spelling loan words), capitalisation, joined and separate words, hyphenated spellings, punctuation, and hyphenation at the end of a line.

Phoneme

phonemicphonemesphonemically
The reform aimed to systematise the correspondence between sounds (phonemes) and letters (graphemes), and to strengthen the principle that derived forms should follow the spelling of the root form.

Grapheme

graphemescharacterscharacter
The reform aimed to systematise the correspondence between sounds (phonemes) and letters (graphemes), and to strengthen the principle that derived forms should follow the spelling of the root form.

Blackletter

Gothic scriptGothicblack letter
ß and ss: In reformed orthography the grapheme ß (a modernised typographical rendering of how sz appeared in traditional Gothic script; it is seldom used in Switzerland) is considered a separate letter that is to appear only after long vowels and diphthongs.

Diphthong

diphthongsfalling diphthonggliding vowel
ß and ss: In reformed orthography the grapheme ß (a modernised typographical rendering of how sz appeared in traditional Gothic script; it is seldom used in Switzerland) is considered a separate letter that is to appear only after long vowels and diphthongs.

Syllable

codaonsetsyllable coda
In the traditional orthography, ß was written instead of ss if the s phoneme belonged to only one syllable, thus in terminal position and before consonants ss was always written as ß, without regard to the length of the preceding vowel.

Phonemic orthography

phonetic spellingphonemicphonetic
The rules of the new spelling concern the following areas: correspondence between sounds and written letters (this includes rules for spelling loan words), capitalisation, joined and separate words, hyphenated spellings, punctuation, and hyphenation at the end of a line.