Gertrude Barrows Bennett

Francis StevensGertrude Bennett
Gertrude Barrows Bennett (September 18, 1884 – February 2, 1948), known by the pseudonym Francis Stevens, was a pioneering author of fantasy and science fiction.wikipedia
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Dark fantasy

darkGothic fantasyhorror fantasy
Bennett wrote a number of fantasies between 1917 and 1923 and has been called "the woman who invented dark fantasy".
Gertrude Barrows Bennett has been called "the woman who invented dark fantasy".

The Heads of Cerberus

Bennett also wrote an early dystopian novel, The Heads of Cerberus (1919).
The Heads of Cerberus is a science fiction novel by American writer Francis Stevens.

Weird Tales

Weird Tales MagazineJ. C. HennebergerJ. M. Lansinger
She stopped writing when her mother died in 1920; one later work published in 1923 appears to have been written during the late 'teens, and submitted to Weird Tales when that magazine was just starting up.
Ashley suggests that the better pulp writers from whom Baird did manage to acquire material, such as Francis Stevens and Austin Hall, were sending Baird stories which had already been rejected elsewhere.

The Thrill Book

Thrill Book
A year later she published her only science fiction novel, The Heads of Cerberus (The Thrill Book, 1919).
The most famous story from The Thrill Book is The Heads of Cerberus, a very early example of a novel about alternate time tracks, by Francis Stevens.

C. L. Moore

C.L. MooreCatherine L. MooreCatherine Moore
Critic Sam Moskowitz said she was the "greatest woman writer of science fiction in the period between Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley and C.L. Moore".
She was among the first women to write in the science fiction and fantasy genres, though earlier woman writers in these genres include Clare Winger Harris, Greye La Spina, and Francis Stevens, amongst others.

A. Merritt

Abraham MerrittMerrittAbraham
It has been said that Bennett's writings influenced both H. P. Lovecraft and A. Merritt, both of whom "emulated Bennett's earlier style and themes".
Merritt's writings were heavily influenced by H. Rider Haggard, Robert W. Chambers, Helena Blavatsky and Gertrude Barrows Bennett (writing as Francis Stevens), with Merritt having "emulated Bennett's earlier style and themes."

Argosy (magazine)

ArgosyAll-Story WeeklyArgosy All-Story Weekly
Her most famous books include Claimed (which Augustus T. Swift, in a letter to The Argosy called "One of the strangest and most compelling science fantasy novels you will ever read") and the lost world novel The Citadel of Fear.
Prior to World War One, The Argosy had several notable writers, including Upton Sinclair, Zane Grey, Albert Payson Terhune, Gertrude Barrows Bennett (under the pseudonym Francis Stevens), and former dime novelist William Wallace Cook.

Women in speculative fiction

Women science fiction authorsWomen in science fictionwomen's science fiction
Science fiction originally had a reputation of being created by men for other men, though the genre had women writers, such as Clare Winger Harris, Miriam Allen deFord, and Gertrude Barrows Bennett, from the beginning.

Feminist science fiction

Femspecfeministfeminist fantasy
As early as 1920, however, women writers of this time, such as Clare Winger Harris ("The Runaway World," 1926) and Gertrude Barrows Bennett (Claimed, 1920), published science fiction stories written from female perspectives and occasionally dealt with gender and sexuality based topics.

Pseudonym

nom de guerrealiaspseudonyms
Gertrude Barrows Bennett (September 18, 1884 – February 2, 1948), known by the pseudonym Francis Stevens, was a pioneering author of fantasy and science fiction.

Fantasy

fantasy fictionfantasiesfantastic
Gertrude Barrows Bennett (September 18, 1884 – February 2, 1948), known by the pseudonym Francis Stevens, was a pioneering author of fantasy and science fiction.

Science fiction

sci-fiscience-fictionSci Fi
Gertrude Barrows Bennett (September 18, 1884 – February 2, 1948), known by the pseudonym Francis Stevens, was a pioneering author of fantasy and science fiction.

Lost world

lost raceLost World (genre)lost civilizations
Her most famous books include Claimed (which Augustus T. Swift, in a letter to The Argosy called "One of the strangest and most compelling science fantasy novels you will ever read") and the lost world novel The Citadel of Fear.

Utopian and dystopian fiction

dystopiandystopian novelutopian novel
Bennett also wrote an early dystopian novel, The Heads of Cerberus (1919).

Minneapolis

Minneapolis, MinnesotaMinneapolis, MNCity of Minneapolis
Gertrude Mabel Barrows was born in Minneapolis in 1884, to Charles and Caroline Barrows (née Hatch).

Shorthand

stenographerstenographystenographers
Instead, she began working as a stenographer, a job she held on and off for the rest of her life.

British people

BritishUnited KingdomBritons
In 1909 Barrows married Stewart Bennett, a British journalist and explorer, and moved to Philadelphia.

Journalist

reporterjournalistsnews reporter
In 1909 Barrows married Stewart Bennett, a British journalist and explorer, and moved to Philadelphia.

Exploration

explorerexplorersexpedition
In 1909 Barrows married Stewart Bennett, a British journalist and explorer, and moved to Philadelphia.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
In 1909 Barrows married Stewart Bennett, a British journalist and explorer, and moved to Philadelphia.

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
In the mid-1920s, Bennett placed her daughter in the care of friends and moved to California.

Novella

novelettenovellasshort novel
The first story she completed after her return to writing was the novella "The Nightmare," which appeared in All-Story Weekly in 1917.

Evolution

evolvedtheory of evolutionevolutionary
The story is set on an island separated from the rest of the world, on which evolution has taken a different course.