Gervase of Canterbury

GervaseGervase the Monk
Gervase of Canterbury (Latin: Gervasus Cantuariensis or Gervasius Dorobornensis) (c. 1141 – c. 1210) was an English chronicler.wikipedia
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Thomas Becket

St Thomas of CanterburySt Thomas BecketSaint Thomas of Canterbury
St. Thomas of Canterbury received his religious profession on 16 February 1163, and perhaps then ordained him.
These include Robert of Torigni's work, Roger of Howden's Gesta Regis Henrici Secundi and Chronica, Ralph Diceto's works, William of Newburgh's Historia Rerum, and Gervase of Canterbury's works.

Canterbury Cathedral

CanterburyChrist Church, CanterburyChrist Church Priory
If Gervase's brother Thomas, who like himself was a monk of Christ Church, Canterbury, was Thomas of Maidstone, they came of a Kentish family.
In September 1174 the quire was severely damaged by fire, necessitating a major reconstruction, the progress of which was recorded in detail by a monk named Gervase.

Baldwin of Forde

Baldwin of ExeterBaldwinArchbishop Baldwin
Historical records show that Gervase took a prominent part in the disputes between the monks and Archbishop Baldwin (1185-1191) and was one of the monks sent to announce to the archbishop an appeal to the pope.
Gervase of Canterbury's story that he was from an even humbler background has been shown by modern scholarship to stem from bias on the medieval chronicler's part.

Hubert Walter

HubertArchbishop HubertHubert, Bishop of Salisbury
As yet, Gervase, though one of the senior monks, had held no prominent office, but about this time he was made sacristan, for in 1193 he attended the new archbishop, Hubert Walter, in that capacity.
The medieval chronicler Gervase of Canterbury said that during Henry II's reign, Walter "ruled England because Glanvill sought his counsel".

Giordano Bruno (crater)

Giordano BrunoGiordano Bruno crater
In 1976 the geologist Jack B. Hartung proposed that this described the formation of the crater Giordano Bruno.
Five monks from Canterbury reported to the abbey's chronicler, Gervase, that shortly after sunset on 18 June 1178, (25 June on the proleptic Gregorian calendar) they saw "the upper horn [of the moon] split in two".

List of plays by Dorothy L. Sayers

He That Should ComeBusman’s Honeymoonplay by Dorothy L. Sayers
A play by Dorothy L. Sayers, The Zeal of Thy House is based on Gervase's account of the injury and resignation of William of Sens.
Sayers’ plot hinged on the eyewitness account of Gervase the Monk who attributed the fall to "either the vengeance of God or the envy of the Devil."

John, King of England

King JohnJohnJohn of England
(2) The Gesta Regum, which is in part an abridgment of the earlier chronicle, and from the year 1199 an independent source of great value for the early years of John's reign.
Reliable accounts of the middle and later parts of John's reign are more limited, with Gervase of Canterbury and Ralph of Coggeshall writing the main accounts; neither of them were positive about John's performance as king.

William of Sens

A play by Dorothy L. Sayers, The Zeal of Thy House is based on Gervase's account of the injury and resignation of William of Sens.
The monk, Gervase, recorded that perhaps it was "The vengeance of God or the spite of the Devil."

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
Gervase of Canterbury (Latin: Gervasus Cantuariensis or Gervasius Dorobornensis) (c.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
1141 – c. 1210) was an English chronicler.

Chronicle

chroniclerchroniclersverse chronicle
1141 – c. 1210) was an English chronicler.

Monk

monksmonasticBrother
If Gervase's brother Thomas, who like himself was a monk of Christ Church, Canterbury, was Thomas of Maidstone, they came of a Kentish family.

Kent

Kent, EnglandCounty of KentCounty Kent
If Gervase's brother Thomas, who like himself was a monk of Christ Church, Canterbury, was Thomas of Maidstone, they came of a Kentish family.

Ordination

ordainedordainordained ministry
St. Thomas of Canterbury received his religious profession on 16 February 1163, and perhaps then ordained him.

Martyr

martyrdommartyredmartyrs
He was certainly one of the monks who buried the saint after his martyrdom, on 29 December 1170.

Pope

PapacypapalBishop of Rome
Historical records show that Gervase took a prominent part in the disputes between the monks and Archbishop Baldwin (1185-1191) and was one of the monks sent to announce to the archbishop an appeal to the pope.

Richard I of England

Richard IRichard the LionheartKing Richard I
In 1189 he was again one of a deputation sent to lay the matter before King Richard I.

Sacristan

sacristecclesiarchgrand ecclesiarch
As yet, Gervase, though one of the senior monks, had held no prominent office, but about this time he was made sacristan, for in 1193 he attended the new archbishop, Hubert Walter, in that capacity.

Death

mortalitydeceaseddead
His death may therefore be assumed in or soon after that year.

Prior

prioressGrand Priorsub-prior
Gervase has occasionally been confused with others of the same name, notably with Gervase of S. Ceneri, and thus he is described as prior of Dover by Dom Brial, which is impossible on chronological grounds.

Dover

Dover, EnglandDover, KentPort of Dover
Gervase has occasionally been confused with others of the same name, notably with Gervase of S. Ceneri, and thus he is described as prior of Dover by Dom Brial, which is impossible on chronological grounds.

Thomas Duffus Hardy

Hardy, Thomas DuffusT. D. HardySir Thomas Duffus Hardy
Thomas Duffus Hardy identified him with Gervase of Chichester, but William Stubbs argued against this theory, as also against confusing him with Gervase of Melkley.

Gervase of Chichester

Thomas Duffus Hardy identified him with Gervase of Chichester, but William Stubbs argued against this theory, as also against confusing him with Gervase of Melkley.

William Stubbs

StubbsStubbs, WilliamBishop Stubbs
Thomas Duffus Hardy identified him with Gervase of Chichester, but William Stubbs argued against this theory, as also against confusing him with Gervase of Melkley.

Gervase of Melkley

Gervais de Melkley
Thomas Duffus Hardy identified him with Gervase of Chichester, but William Stubbs argued against this theory, as also against confusing him with Gervase of Melkley.