Ghetto

ghettosghettoizationghettoisationhoodghettoizedJewish ghettosghettoizingJewish ghettoa part of the town separatedAfrican American ghetto
A ghetto, often the ghetto, is a part of a city in which members of a minority group live, typically as a result of social, legal, or economic pressure.wikipedia
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Venetian Ghetto

ghettoGhetto of Venicethe Jewish community
The term was originally used for the Venetian Ghetto in Venice, Italy, as early as 1516, to describe the part of the city where Jews were restricted to live and thus segregated from other peoples.
The English word ghetto is derived from the Jewish ghetto in Venice.

Residential segregation in the United States

residential segregationsegregationsegregated
The term was originally used for the Venetian Ghetto in Venice, Italy, as early as 1516, to describe the part of the city where Jews were restricted to live and thus segregated from other peoples. Forty years after the American civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, most of the United States remains a residentially segregated society in which blacks and whites inhabit different neighborhoods of significantly different quality.
Overt ordinances were struck down in Buchanan v. Warley, 245 U.S. 60 (1917) but the practice continued and became deeply ingrained in urban culture, resulting in limited housing for an expanding population and development of the African-American ghetto with poor overcrowded housing and numerous social ills.

Mellah

ghettosJewish quartermellahs
A mellah (Arabic ملاح, probably from the word ملح, Arabic for "salt") is a walled Jewish quarter of a city in Morocco, an analogue of the European ghetto.
A mellah (ملاح and, the Arabic meaning "salt spring" or "salt marsh" which was the area of the first Jewish settlement in Fez) is a walled Jewish quarter of a city in Morocco, often mistakenly conflated with the European ghettos.

Ethnic enclave

ethnic enclavesenclavesenclave
The Irish and German immigrants of the mid-19th century were the first ethnic groups to form ethnic enclaves in United States cities.
In some cases, enclaves have been enforced by law, as in a ghetto.

Civil rights movement

American Civil Rights Movementcivil rightscivil rights era
Forty years after the American civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, most of the United States remains a residentially segregated society in which blacks and whites inhabit different neighborhoods of significantly different quality.
The result was the development of all-black ghettos in the North and West, where much housing was older, as well as South.

Heinrich Himmler

HimmlerAlfred HimmlerH Himmler
On June 21, 1943, Heinrich Himmler issued a decree ordering the dissolution of all ghettos in the East and their transformation into Nazi concentration camps.
Under Himmler's orders via the RSHA, these squads were also tasked with rounding up Jews and others for placement in ghettos and concentration camps.

Racial segregation

segregationsegregatedsegregationist
The inability of blacks to move from the ground floor, as Ward suggests, is dependent upon prejudice and segregationist patterns experienced in the South prior to World War I. After the exodus of African-Americans to the North during and after World War I, the range of occupations in the North was further altered by the settlement of European immigrants; thus, African-Americans were diminished to unskilled jobs.
Jews in Europe were generally forced, by decree or informal pressure, to live in highly segregated ghettos and shtetls.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
The term was originally used for the Venetian Ghetto in Venice, Italy, as early as 1516, to describe the part of the city where Jews were restricted to live and thus segregated from other peoples.
In the Papal States, which existed until 1870, Jews were required to live only in specified neighborhoods called ghettos.

Geographical segregation

social segregationsegregatedsegregation
Jewish quarters, like the Jewish ghettos in Europe, were often the outgrowths of segregated ghettos instituted by the surrounding authorities.
Another segregation term, the ghetto, has been used in many different contexts over time, generally meaning any physical part of a city predominantly occupied by any particular group of people.

Roman Ghetto

ghettoGhetto of RomeJews of Rome
In other cases, ghettos were places of terrible poverty and during periods of population growth, ghettos (as that of Rome) had narrow streets and tall, crowded houses.
The Roman Ghetto was the last remaining ghetto in Western Europe until ghettos were reintroduced by Nazi Germany in the 1930s.

Underclass

lower classlower classeslower-class
As a result, the ghetto becomes primarily occupied by what sociologists and journalists of the 1980s and 1990s frequently title the "underclass."
Studies concerning the post-civil rights African American ghetto often include a discussion of the urban underclass.

Gay village

gayborhoodgay neighborhoodgay ghetto
A gay village (also known as a gay neighbourhood or 'gayborhood', gay enclave, gay village, gaytto, "Boystown") is a geographical area with generally recognized boundaries, inhabited or frequented by a large number of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people.
However, today's manifestations of "queer ghettos" bear little resemblance to those of the 1970s.

Hip hop

hip-hophip hop culturehiphop
While "ghetto" as an adjective can be used derogatorily, the African-American or Black community, particularly the hip hop scene, has taken the word for themselves and begun using it in a more positive sense that transcends its derogatory origins.
As a result, gangsta rap became a platform for artists who chose to use their music to spread political and social messages to parts of the country that were previously unaware of the conditions of ghettos.

Inner city

inner-cityinner citiescity centers
Accordingly, a concentration of African-Americans was established in the inner city neighborhoods.

White flight

massive outflow of city residents to the suburbsurban exodusmiddle-class flight
In the years following World War II, many white Americans began to move away from inner cities to newer suburban communities, a process known as white flight.
The result was severe urban decay that, by the 1960s, resulted in crumbling "ghettos".

In the Ghetto

En El Barrio
In 1969, Elvis Presley released a song written by Mac Davis about birth and life in slum areas, titled "In the Ghetto".
It is a narrative of generational poverty: A boy is born to a mother who already has more children than she can feed in the ghetto of Chicago.

Ghetto (disambiguation)

Ghetto § Music
For other music about the ghetto, see Ghetto § Music.
Ghetto refers to a portion of a municipality in which a particular ethnic or racial group lives, often in poor conditions.

Jewish quarter (diaspora)

Jewish quarterJewish ghettoJudengasse
In the Jewish diaspora, a Jewish quarter (also known as jewry, juiverie, Judengasse, Jewynstreet, or proto-ghetto ) is the area of a city traditionally inhabited by Jews.

Ghetto fabulous

As a comedic device, it often dramatizes and draws attention to life in the ghetto.

Slum

slumsslum housingurban squalor
Numerous other non English terms are often used interchangeably with slum: shanty town, favela, rookery, gecekondu, skid row, barrio, ghetto, bidonville, taudis, bandas de miseria, barrio marginal, morro, loteamento, barraca, musseque, tugurio, solares, mudun safi, karyan, medina achouaia, brarek, ishash, galoos, tanake, baladi, trushchoby, chalis, katras, zopadpattis, bustee, estero, looban, dagatan, umjondolo, watta, udukku, and chereka bete.

Ghetto (Akon song)

GhettoGhetto (Remix)Ghetto" (Akon song)
A number of other songs have been written about the ghetto, including Akon's "Ghetto".
Akon describes the meaning of the song, reflected in the song's lyrics, as "a description of the cycle of poverty experienced by those living in poor, inner-city areas" (see ghetto).

Rural ghetto

According to an April 1993 review of the book by Fred Magdoff, rural ghettos are often "omitted from most people's conception of poverty."

City

citiesUrbanCivil (City)
In France, a banlieue is a suburb of a large city.
People living relatively close together may live, work, and play, in separate areas, and associate with different people, forming ethnic or lifestyle enclaves or, in areas of concentrated poverty, ghettoes.

Blockbusting

block busting [4] block-busting
However, in the Shelley v. Kraemer case in 1948, the Supreme Court ruled that the Amendment's Equal Protection Clause outlawed the states' legal enforcement of racially restrictive covenants in state courts.[[Blockbusting#cite note-5| [5] ]] In this event, decades of segregation practices were annulled, which had compelled blacks to live in over-crowded and over-priced ghettos.