A report on Giacomo Aragall

Giacomo Aragall (left)

Spanish operatic tenor.

- Giacomo Aragall
Giacomo Aragall (left)

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Pavarotti upon receiving the Kennedy Center Honors, 2001

Luciano Pavarotti

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Italian operatic tenor who during the late part of his career crossed over into popular music, eventually becoming one of the most acclaimed and loved tenors of all time.

Italian operatic tenor who during the late part of his career crossed over into popular music, eventually becoming one of the most acclaimed and loved tenors of all time.

Pavarotti upon receiving the Kennedy Center Honors, 2001
Luciano Pavarotti in 1972
With Joan Sutherland in I puritani (1976)
From left: journalist Vincenzo Mollica, Pavarotti, Lucio Dalla and Zucchero on the first edition of Pavarotti & Friends (1992)
Elton John and Pavarotti in Modena, 1996
Luciano Pavarotti performing on 15 June 2002 at a concert in the Stade Vélodrome in Marseille
Pavarotti and family, N.Y.C., 1979–1983. Clockwise from top: Luciano Pavarotti, daughters Cristina and Lorenza Pavarotti, wife Adua Veroni, daughter Giuliana Pavarotti.
Pavarotti performing at the 2006 Winter Olympics opening ceremony
Statue of Pavarotti in Eilat IMAX
Grave of Luciano Pavarotti and his family in Montale Rangone
Pavarotti embraces Karen Kondazian on the set of Yes, Giorgio
Handprint of Luciano Pavarotti in front of the Gaiety Theatre, Dublin

After the extended Australian tour, he returned to La Scala, where he added Tebaldo from I Capuleti e i Montecchi to his repertoire on 26 March 1966, with Giacomo Aragall as Romeo.

Sutherland in 1975

Joan Sutherland

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Australian dramatic coloratura soprano known for her contribution to the renaissance of the bel canto repertoire from the late 1950s through to the 1980s.

Australian dramatic coloratura soprano known for her contribution to the renaissance of the bel canto repertoire from the late 1950s through to the 1980s.

Sutherland in 1975
Sutherland in 1962
Joan Sutherland in 1990

Lucrezia Borgia—Joan Sutherland (Lucrezia), Giacomo Aragall (Gennaro), Marilyn Horne (Orsini), Ingvar Wixell (Alfonso), London Opera Chorus, National Philharmonic Orchestra, Richard Bonynge (conductor), Decca, 1977.

Guiditta Grisi and Amalia Schutz at La Scala, December 1830

I Capuleti e i Montecchi

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Italian opera (Tragedia lirica) in two acts by Vincenzo Bellini.

Italian opera (Tragedia lirica) in two acts by Vincenzo Bellini.

Guiditta Grisi and Amalia Schutz at La Scala, December 1830
Guiditta Grisi and Amalia Schutz at La Scala, December 1830
Bellini in about 1830
Mezzo Giuditta Grisi, sang Romeo
Venice impresario Alessandro Lanari
Soprano Rosalbina Caradori-Allan, sang Giulietta
Composer Giovanni Pacini
Maria Malibran as Romeo, Bologna, 1832
Giuditta Pasta, Romeo in 1833
Wilhelmine Schröder-Devrient, Romeo in 1834 & 1835
Giuseppina Ronzi de Begnis, restored Bellini's ending, 1834
Francesco Hayez, Romeo and Juliet's last kiss

This staging reworked the part of Romeo for the tenor voice, with Giacomo Aragall taking on the role.

Original poster for the premiere

Esclarmonde

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Opéra in four acts and eight tableaux, with prologue and epilogue, by Jules Massenet, to a French libretto by Alfred Blau and Louis Ferdinand de Gramont.

Opéra in four acts and eight tableaux, with prologue and epilogue, by Jules Massenet, to a French libretto by Alfred Blau and Louis Ferdinand de Gramont.

Original poster for the premiere

23 October 1974 – the War Memorial Opera House (San Francisco) premiere, with additional performances in October (26 and 29) and November (2 and 8, the latter broadcast live). Production by Lotfi Mansouri, scenery and design by Beni Montresor, choreography by Norbert Vasek. All cast in debut role: Richard Bonynge conducting, Joan Sutherland (Esclarmonde), Giacomo Aragall (Roland), Huguette Tourangeau (Parséis), William Harness (Énéas), Clifford Grant (Phorcas), Robert Kerns (Bishop of Blois), Philip Booth (Cléomer).

Vienna State Opera

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Opera house and opera company based in Vienna, Austria.

Opera house and opera company based in Vienna, Austria.

Construction site of the new building, 1863
Play bill for the opening performance of the new Opernhaus, announcing the opening performance of Don Giovanni on 25 May 1869
Coeval watercolour painting of the opening performance (Kunsthistorisches Museum)
The Hofoper, c. 1898
Play bill of the last performance in the old building: Götterdämmerung, 30 June 1944
Gustav Mahler was artistic director of the Hofoper from 1897 to 1907
Herbert von Karajan, artistic director of the Vienna State Opera from 1957 to 1964
View from the Ring, on the roof the tent for children's performances (demounted in 2015 and now replaced by a special theatre)
View of the orchestra pit and safety curtain The curtain Play as Cast was designed by Tacita Dean, and installed during the season 2004–2005.
Debutants entry at the Vienna Opera Ball
Rear of the opera house, showing the stage wings
A marble staircase between the main entrance and the first floor
One of the lobbies
Emperor's private room.
The auditorium
Central chandelier in the auditorium
Exterior of the building

Giacomo Aragall

Liceu façade (2006)

Liceu

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Opera house on La Rambla in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

Opera house on La Rambla in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain.

Liceu façade (2006)
View of the house from the stage, 1847
Explosion of Liceu of Barcelona by the anarchist Santiago Salvador in the cover of the newspaper Le Petit Journal, 1893
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Foyer of Gran Teatre del Liceu, named Saló dels Miralls (Mirrors Hall), preserved from the 1994 fire.
Gaetano Donizetti, composer of Anna Bolena, the first opera performed at the Liceu.
Turandot (Liceu, 1980) with Montserrat Caballé and
, Júlia Peraire's portrait (1907) by Ramon Casas, a painting at the Círculo del Liceo

1960s: Joan Sutherland (1960/1989), Piero Cappuccilli (1961/1994), Fiorenza Cossotto (1961/1994), Montserrat Caballé (1962/2007), Virginia Zeani (1963/1977), (1964/1989), Plácido Domingo (1966/2015), Jaume Aragall (1964–1997), Vicente Sardinero (1964/1997), Richard Tucker (1965/1975), Grace Bumbry (1966/1988), Anja Silja (1966/2000).

The composer in 1919

La vida breve (opera)

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Opera in two acts and four scenes by Manuel de Falla to an original Spanish libretto by Carlos Fernández-Shaw.

Opera in two acts and four scenes by Manuel de Falla to an original Spanish libretto by Carlos Fernández-Shaw.

The composer in 1919

García Navarro / María José Montiel, Alicia Nafé, Giacomo Aragall, Alfonso Echeverría - RTVE (DVD), 1997, live in Madrid