Giacomo Meyerbeer

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Giacomo Meyerbeer (born Jacob Liebmann Beer; 5 September 1791 – 2 May 1864) was a German opera composer of Jewish birth who has been described as perhaps the most successful stage composer of the nineteenth century.wikipedia
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Robert le diable

Meyerbeer's ''Robert le diableRobert av NormandieRobert der Teufel
With his 1831 opera Robert le diable and its successors, he gave the genre of grand opera 'decisive character'. His 1824 opera Il crociato in Egitto was the first to bring him Europe-wide reputation, but it was Robert le diable (1831) which raised his status to great celebrity.
Robert le diable (Robert the Devil) is an opera in five acts composed by Giacomo Meyerbeer from a libretto written by Eugène Scribe and Germain Delavigne.

Les Huguenots

RaoulGli UgonottiDie Hugenotten
His public career, lasting from then until his death, during which he remained a dominating figure in the world of opera, was summarized by his contemporary Hector Berlioz, who claimed that he 'has not only the luck to be talented, but the talent to be lucky.' He was at his peak with his operas Les Huguenots (1836) and Le prophète (1849); his last opera (L'Africaine) was performed posthumously.
Les Huguenots is a French opera by Giacomo Meyerbeer, one of the most popular and spectacular examples of the style of grand opera.

Opera

opera singeroperasoperatic
Giacomo Meyerbeer (born Jacob Liebmann Beer; 5 September 1791 – 2 May 1864) was a German opera composer of Jewish birth who has been described as perhaps the most successful stage composer of the nineteenth century.
It also saw the advent of Grand Opera typified by the works of Auber and Meyerbeer.

Le prophète

Der ProphetJohn of LeydenProfeten
His public career, lasting from then until his death, during which he remained a dominating figure in the world of opera, was summarized by his contemporary Hector Berlioz, who claimed that he 'has not only the luck to be talented, but the talent to be lucky.' He was at his peak with his operas Les Huguenots (1836) and Le prophète (1849); his last opera (L'Africaine) was performed posthumously.
Le prophète (The Prophet) is a grand opera in five acts by Giacomo Meyerbeer.

Il crociato in Egitto

Il crociato
His 1824 opera Il crociato in Egitto was the first to bring him Europe-wide reputation, but it was Robert le diable (1831) which raised his status to great celebrity. All but the last two of these had libretti by Gaetano Rossi, whom Meyerbeer continued to support until the latter's death in 1855, although not commissioning any further libretti from him after Il crociato in Egitto (1824).
Il crociato in Egitto (The Crusader in Egypt) is an opera in two acts by Giacomo Meyerbeer, with a libretto by Gaetano Rossi.

L'Africaine

L'AfricanaL'Africaine – Vasco da GamaVasco
His public career, lasting from then until his death, during which he remained a dominating figure in the world of opera, was summarized by his contemporary Hector Berlioz, who claimed that he 'has not only the luck to be talented, but the talent to be lucky.' He was at his peak with his operas Les Huguenots (1836) and Le prophète (1849); his last opera (L'Africaine) was performed posthumously.
L'Africaine (The African Woman) is a grand opera in five acts, the last work of the composer Giacomo Meyerbeer.

Richard Wagner

WagnerWagnerianWagner’s
He was an early supporter of Richard Wagner, enabling the first production of the latter's opera Rienzi.
Initially establishing his reputation as a composer of works in the romantic vein of Carl Maria von Weber and Giacomo Meyerbeer, Wagner revolutionised opera through his concept of the Gesamtkunstwerk ("total work of art"), by which he sought to synthesise the poetic, visual, musical and dramatic arts, with music subsidiary to drama.

Ein Feldlager in Schlesien

A Camp in SilesiaThe Camp of Silesia
He was commissioned to write the patriotic opera Ein Feldlager in Schlesien to celebrate the reopening of the Berlin Royal Opera House in 1844 and wrote music for certain Prussian state occasions.
Ein Feldlager in Schlesien (A Camp in Silesia) is a Singspiel in three acts by Giacomo Meyerbeer with a German-language libretto by Ludwig Rellstab after Eugène Scribe's Le camp de Silésie.

Libretto

librettistlibrettibook
These were employed in the context of sensational and melodramatic libretti created by Eugène Scribe and were enhanced by the up-to-date theatre technology of the Paris Opéra. All but the last two of these had libretti by Gaetano Rossi, whom Meyerbeer continued to support until the latter's death in 1855, although not commissioning any further libretti from him after Il crociato in Egitto (1824).
Eugène Scribe was one of the most prolific librettists of the 19th century, providing the words for works by Meyerbeer (with whom he had a lasting collaboration), Auber, Bellini, Donizetti, Rossini and Verdi.

Grand opera

grand opéraballet-divertissementDuponchel
With his 1831 opera Robert le diable and its successors, he gave the genre of grand opera 'decisive character'.
Another important forerunner was Il crociato in Egitto by Meyerbeer, who eventually became the acknowledged king of the grand opera genre.

Rienzi

Rienzi, der Letzte der TribunenOverture to Rienzi
He was an early supporter of Richard Wagner, enabling the first production of the latter's opera Rienzi.
Hans von Bülow was later to joke that "Rienzi is Meyerbeer's best opera".

Michael Beer (poet)

Michael Beer
Their other children included the astronomer Wilhelm Beer and the poet Michael Beer.
His elder brother was the composer Giacomo Meyerbeer; another brother was the astronomer Wilhelm Beer.

Eugène Scribe

ScribeEugene ScribeE. Scribe
These were employed in the context of sensational and melodramatic libretti created by Eugène Scribe and were enhanced by the up-to-date theatre technology of the Paris Opéra.
He collaborated with Giacomo Meyerbeer on a number of occasions, and also provided the words for works by Giuseppe Verdi (Les vêpres siciliennes), Vincenzo Bellini, Daniel Auber (La muette de Portici, Gustave III and others), Fromental Halévy (including La Juive, Guido et Ginevra, and Le Juif errant), François-Adrien Boieldieu, Gaetano Donizetti (Dom Sébastien) and Gioachino Rossini (Le comte Ory). At the time of his death, he was working on a revision of the libretto for Meyerbeer's L'Africaine, which he had originally written in 1838.

Wilhelm Beer

Beer, WilhelmWilhelm W. Beer
Their other children included the astronomer Wilhelm Beer and the poet Michael Beer.
Wilhelm Wolff Beer (4 January 1797 – 27 March 1850) was a banker and astronomer from Berlin, Prussia, and the brother of Giacomo Meyerbeer.

Muzio Clementi

ClementiClementi, MuzioMessrs. Longman Clementi & Co.
Beer also became one of Muzio Clementi's pupils while Clementi was in Berlin.
Influenced by Domenico Scarlatti's harpsichord school and Haydn's classical school and by the stile galante of Johann Christian Bach and Ignazio Cirri, Clementi developed a fluent and technical legato style, which he passed on to a generation of pianists, including John Field, Johann Baptist Cramer, Ignaz Moscheles, Giacomo Meyerbeer, Friedrich Kalkbrenner, Johann Nepomuk Hummel and Carl Czerny.

Franz Lauska

Beer's first keyboard instructor was Franz Lauska, a pupil of Johann Georg Albrechtsberger and a favoured teacher at the Berlin court.
Franz Seraphin Lauska (13 January 1764 – 18 April 1825), baptised as Franciscus Ignatius Joannes Nepomucensis Carolus Boromaeus, was a Moravian pianist, composer, and teacher of Giacomo Meyerbeer.

Jephtas Gelübde

Daughter of Jeptha
Despite performances of his oratorio Gott und die Natur (God and Nature) (Berlin, 1811) and his early operas Jephtas Gelübde (Jephtha's Vow) (Munich, 1812) and Wirth und Gast (Landlord and Guest) (Stuttgart, 1813) in Germany, Meyerbeer had set his sights by 1814 on basing an operatic career in Paris.
Jephtas Gelübde (The vow of Jephtha) was the first opera composed by Giacomo Meyerbeer.

Gioachino Rossini

RossiniGioacchino RossiniG. Rossini
During his years in Italy Meyerbeer became acquainted with, and impressed by, the works of his contemporary Gioachino Rossini, who by 1816, at the age of 24, was already director of both major opera houses in Naples and in the same year premiered his operas The Barber of Seville and Otello.
Rossini’s withdrawal from opera for the last 40 years of his life has never been fully explained; contributary factors may have been ill-health, the wealth which his success had brought him, and the rise of spectacular Grand Opera under composers such as Giacomo Meyerbeer.

Semiramide riconosciuta (Meyerbeer)

Semiramide riconosciutaSemiramide reconosciuta
Meyerbeer wrote a series of Italian operas on Rossinian models, including Romilda e Costanza (Padua, 1817), Semiramide riconosciuta (Turin, 1819), Emma di Resburgo (Venice, 1819), Margherita d'Anjou (Milan 1820) and L'esule di Granata (Milan 1821).
Semiramide riconosciuta (Semiramis recognised) is a dramma per musica in two acts by Giacomo Meyerbeer.

L'esule di Granata

Meyerbeer wrote a series of Italian operas on Rossinian models, including Romilda e Costanza (Padua, 1817), Semiramide riconosciuta (Turin, 1819), Emma di Resburgo (Venice, 1819), Margherita d'Anjou (Milan 1820) and L'esule di Granata (Milan 1821).
L'esule di Granata (The exile of Granada) is a melodramma serio (serious opera ) in two acts by Giacomo Meyerbeer.

Emma di Resburgo

Meyerbeer wrote a series of Italian operas on Rossinian models, including Romilda e Costanza (Padua, 1817), Semiramide riconosciuta (Turin, 1819), Emma di Resburgo (Venice, 1819), Margherita d'Anjou (Milan 1820) and L'esule di Granata (Milan 1821).
Emma di Resburgo (Emma of Roxburgh) is a melodramma eroico (a heroic, serious opera) in two acts by Giacomo Meyerbeer.

Gaetano Rossi

All but the last two of these had libretti by Gaetano Rossi, whom Meyerbeer continued to support until the latter's death in 1855, although not commissioning any further libretti from him after Il crociato in Egitto (1824).
Gaetano Rossi (18 May 1774 – 25 January 1855) was an Italian opera librettist for several of the well-known bel canto-era composers including Gioachino Rossini, Gaetano Donizetti, and Saverio Mercadante in Italy and Giacomo Meyerbeer in one of his early Italian successes.

Ignaz Moscheles

MoschelesMoscheles, IgnazMoschelès
Certainly other professionals in the decade 1810–1820, including Moscheles, considered him amongst the greatest virtuosi of his period.
Here too he became a close friend of Meyerbeer (at that time still a piano virtuoso, not yet a composer) and their extemporized piano-duets were highly acclaimed.

Die beiden Kalifen

In the same year, his opera Die beiden Kalifen (The Two Caliphs), a version of Wirth und Gast, was a disastrous failure in Vienna.
Die beiden Kalifen (The Two Caliphs) is an 1813 opera in two acts by Giacomo Meyerbeer (or as he was then known, Jacob Meyerbeer), to a libretto by Johann Gottfried Wöhlbruch, based on a tale from the Arabian Nights.

Margherita d'Anjou

Meyerbeer wrote a series of Italian operas on Rossinian models, including Romilda e Costanza (Padua, 1817), Semiramide riconosciuta (Turin, 1819), Emma di Resburgo (Venice, 1819), Margherita d'Anjou (Milan 1820) and L'esule di Granata (Milan 1821).
Margherita d'Anjou is an opera semiseria in two acts by Giacomo Meyerbeer.