Giant panda

pandagiant pandasAiluropoda melanoleucapanda bearpandaspanda bearsa pandaA. melanoleucagiantHimalayan Panda
The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca; ), also known as panda bear or simply panda, is a bear native to south central China.wikipedia
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Carnivora

carnivorescarnivorancarnivorans
Though it belongs to the order Carnivora, the giant panda is a folivore, with bamboo shoots and leaves making up more than 99% of its diet.
The giant panda is largely a herbivore, but also feeds on fish, eggs, and insects.

Red panda

red pandasAiluruslesser panda
The name "giant panda" is sometimes used to distinguish it from the distantly related red panda. Even in 2013, the Encyclopædia Britannica still used "giant panda" or "panda bear" for the bear, and simply "panda" for the red panda, despite the popular usage of the word "panda" to refer to giant pandas.
It is not closely related to the giant panda, which is a basal ursid.

Fuwa

five stuffed animal mascotsFu WaJingjing
As such, it is becoming widely used within China in international contexts, for example, appearing since 1982 on gold panda bullion coins and as one of the five Fuwa mascots of the Beijing Olympics.

Bear

Ursidaebearsursine
The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca; ), also known as panda bear or simply panda, is a bear native to south central China.
While the polar bear is mostly carnivorous, and the giant panda feeds almost entirely on bamboo, the remaining six species are omnivorous with varied diets.

Jia Jia (giant panda)

Jia Jia
A female named Jia Jia was the oldest giant panda ever in captivity, born in 1978 and died at an age of 38 on 16 October 2016.
Jia Jia was a female giant panda who resided at Ocean Park Hong Kong.

Chinese Gold Panda

Gold PandaChinese PandaChinese Panda coins
As such, it is becoming widely used within China in international contexts, for example, appearing since 1982 on gold panda bullion coins and as one of the five Fuwa mascots of the Beijing Olympics.
Different portraits of panda that changes every year (except for 2001 and 2002, which share the same design).

Bamboo

bamboosBambusoideaebamboo forest
Though it belongs to the order Carnivora, the giant panda is a folivore, with bamboo shoots and leaves making up more than 99% of its diet.
Soft bamboo shoots, stems and leaves are the major food source of the giant panda of China, the red panda of Nepal, and the bamboo lemurs of Madagascar.

Asian black bear

Asiatic black bearblack bearAsiatic black bears
Although adult giant pandas have few natural predators other than humans, young cubs are vulnerable to attacks by snow leopards, yellow-throated martens, eagles, feral dogs, and the Asian black bear.
The species is morphologically very similar to some prehistoric bears, and is thought by some scientists to be the ancestor of other extant bear species (aside from pandas and spectacled bears).

Encyclopædia Britannica

BritannicaEncyclopedia BritannicaEncyclopaedia Britannica
Even in 2013, the Encyclopædia Britannica still used "giant panda" or "panda bear" for the bear, and simply "panda" for the red panda, despite the popular usage of the word "panda" to refer to giant pandas.
For the quantitative analysis, ten articles were selected at random—circumcision, Charles Drew, Galileo, Philip Glass, heart disease, IQ, panda bear, sexual harassment, Shroud of Turin and Uzbekistan—and letter grades of A–D or F were awarded in four categories: coverage, accuracy, clarity, and recency.

The Panda's Thumb (book)

The Panda's ThumbThe Panda's Thumb: More Reflections in Natural HistoryThe Panda's Thumb: More Reflections on Natural History
Stephen Jay Gould discusses this feature in his book of essays on evolution and biology, The Panda's Thumb.
The title essay (of 1978, originally titled "The panda's peculiar thumb") presents the paradox that poor design is a better argument for evolution than good design, as illustrated by the anatomy of the panda's "thumb"—which is not a thumb at all—but an extension of the radial sesamoid.

Paw

padspawsfoot
The giant panda's paw has a "thumb" and five fingers; the "thumb" – actually a modified sesamoid bone – helps it to hold bamboo while eating.
The paw consists of the large, heart-shaped metacarpal or palmar pad (forelimb) or metatarsal or plantar pad (rear limb), and generally four load-bearing digital pads, although there can be five or six toes in the case of domestic cats and bears (including giant panda).

Panda pornography

videos of giant pandas mating
This led some scientists to try extreme methods, such as showing them videos of giant pandas mating and giving the males sildenafil (commonly known by name Viagra).
Panda pornography (or panda porn) refers generally to movies depicting mating pandas, intended to promote sexual arousal in captive giant pandas.

Tainan fake panda incident

This name did not gain its popularity until 1988, when a private zoo in Tainan painted a sun bear black and white and created the Tainan fake panda incident.
The Tainan fake panda incident refers to an incident at a private zoo in Tainan, Taiwan, where a sun bear was painted black and white and falsely presented to visitors as a giant panda.

Gansu

Gansu ProvinceKansuGansu, China
The giant panda lives in a few mountain ranges in central China, mainly in Sichuan, but also in neighbouring Shaanxi and Gansu.
Gansu's mammals include some of the world's most charismatic: the giant panda, golden monkeys, lynx, snow leopards, sika deer, musk deer, and the Bactrian camel.

Adaptation

adaptedadaptationsadaptive
Two of the panda's most distinctive features, its large size and round face, are adaptations to its bamboo diet.
Many herbivores are like this; extreme examples are koalas which depend on Eucalyptus, and giant pandas which require bamboo.

Brookfield Zoo

Chicago Zoological SocietyChicago Zoological ParkChicago Zoological Society - Brookfield Zoo
In 1936, Ruth Harkness became the first Westerner to bring back a live giant panda, a cub named Su Lin which went to live at the Brookfield Zoo in Chicago.
The zoo was also the first in America to exhibit giant pandas, one of which (Su Lin ) has been taxidermied and put on display in Chicago's Field Museum of Natural History.

Durophagy

durophagouscrushing shellsdurophage
The panda's skull shape is typical of durophagous carnivorans.
Bonecrackers are exemplified by hyenas and saber-toothed cats, while bamboo eaters are primarily the giant panda and the red panda.

Su Lin (1930s giant panda)

Su Lin
In 1936, Ruth Harkness became the first Westerner to bring back a live giant panda, a cub named Su Lin which went to live at the Brookfield Zoo in Chicago.
Su Lin was the name given to the giant panda cub captured in 1936 and brought to America by the explorer Ruth Harkness.

Yellow-throated marten

Martes flavigulayellow-throated martensHimalayan marten
Although adult giant pandas have few natural predators other than humans, young cubs are vulnerable to attacks by snow leopards, yellow-throated martens, eagles, feral dogs, and the Asian black bear.
It may prey on panda cubs and smaller marten species, such as sables.

Tuan Tuan and Yuan Yuan

parentsTuan TuanYuan Yuan (giant panda)
A contest in 2006 to name the pandas was held in the mainland, resulting in the politically charged names Tuan Tuan and Yuan Yuan (from tuanyuan, meaning "reunion", i.e. "reunification").
Tuan Tuan and Yuan Yuan are two giant pandas that were sent by mainland China to Taiwan in 2008 as part of an exchange program.

Ruth Harkness

In 1936, Ruth Harkness became the first Westerner to bring back a live giant panda, a cub named Su Lin which went to live at the Brookfield Zoo in Chicago.
Ruth Elizabeth Harkness (21 September 1900 - 20 July 1947) was an American fashion designer and socialite, who traveled to China in 1936 and brought out the first live giant panda to the United States - not in a cage, or on a leash, but wrapped in her arms.

Field Museum of Natural History

Field MuseumThe Field MuseumChicago Natural History Museum
Kermit and Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., became the first Westerners to shoot a panda, on an expedition funded by the Field Museum of Natural History in the 1920s.

Fargesia dracocephala

Pandas eat any of 25 bamboo species in the wild, such as Fargesia dracocephala and Fargesia rufa.
The plant is a significant source of food for the giant panda.

Habitat destruction

habitat losshabitat degradationloss of habitat
The giant panda is a vulnerable species, threatened by continued habitat loss and habitat fragmentation, and by a very low birthrate, both in the wild and in captivity.
One of the most famous examples is the impact upon China's giant panda, once found across the nation.

Sesamoid bone

sesamoidsesamoid bonesulnar sesamoid
The giant panda's paw has a "thumb" and five fingers; the "thumb" – actually a modified sesamoid bone – helps it to hold bamboo while eating.
Although many carnivores have radial sesamoid bones, the giant panda and red panda independently evolved to have an enlarged radial sesamoid bone.