Gibbeting

gibbetgibbetedgibbetshanged in chainshung in chainspublic displaycagegibethanging in chainsiron cages (gibbet)
A gibbet is any instrument of public execution (including guillotine, executioner's block, impalement stake, hanging gallows, or related scaffold), but gibbeting refers to the use of a gallows-type structure from which the dead or dying bodies of criminals were hung on public display to deter other existing or potential criminals.wikipedia
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Decapitation

beheadeddecapitatedbeheading
A gibbet is any instrument of public execution (including guillotine, executioner's block, impalement stake, hanging gallows, or related scaffold), but gibbeting refers to the use of a gallows-type structure from which the dead or dying bodies of criminals were hung on public display to deter other existing or potential criminals.
This might be done to take the head as a trophy, for public display, to make the deceased more difficult to identify, for cryonics, or for other, more esoteric reasons.

Murder Act 1751

Murder Act 1752publicly dissected
This practice was regularised in England by the Murder Act 1751, which empowered judges to impose this for murder.
The Act included the provision "for better preventing the horrid crime of murder" "that some further terror and peculiar mark of infamy be added to the punishment", and that "in no case whatsoever shall the body of any murderer be suffered to be buried", by mandating either public dissection or "hanging in chains" of the cadaver.

Hanged, drawn and quartered

hanged, drawn, and quarteredhanging, drawing and quarteringdrawing and quartering
The rebels Henry of Montfort and Henry of Wylynton, enemies of Edward II, were drawn and hanged before being exhibited on a gibbet near Bristol.
There he was hanged from a gibbet until dead.

Wapping

St John of WappingOld Wapping StairsSt John, Wapping
In London, Execution Dock is located on the north bank of the River Thames in Wapping; after tidal immersion, particularly notorious criminals' bodies could be hung in cages a little farther downstream at either Cuckold's Point or Blackwall Point, as a warning to other waterborne criminals of the possible consequences of their actions (such a fate befell Captain William Kidd in May 1701).
Wapping was also the site of 'Execution Dock', where pirates and other water-borne criminals faced execution by hanging from a gibbet constructed close to the low water mark.

Greenwich Peninsula

North GreenwichBlackwall PointEast Greenwich
In London, Execution Dock is located on the north bank of the River Thames in Wapping; after tidal immersion, particularly notorious criminals' bodies could be hung in cages a little farther downstream at either Cuckold's Point or Blackwall Point, as a warning to other waterborne criminals of the possible consequences of their actions (such a fate befell Captain William Kidd in May 1701).
In the 17th century, Blackwall Point (the northern tip of the peninsula, opposite Blackwall) gained notoriety as a location where pirates' corpses were hung in cages as a deterrent to other would-be pirates.

Crucifixion

crucifiedcrucifycross
Public crucifixion with prolonged display of the body after death can be seen as a form of gibbeting.
The gibbet on which crucifixion was carried out could be of many shapes.

Rye, East Sussex

RyeRye, SussexRye Bay
For example, in March 1743 in the town of Rye, East Sussex, Allen Grebell was murdered by John Breads.
Two gruesome relics of Rye's violent past include the gibbet cage which was famously used to display the hanged body of the murderer John Breads in 1742, and the pillory last used in 1813 in the case of a local publican who assisted the escape of the French General Phillipon.

Piracy

piratepiratespirate ship
It was most often used for traitors, murderers, highwaymen, pirates, and sheep stealers and was intended to discourage others from committing similar offences.
Their bodies were enclosed in iron cages (gibbet) (for which they were measured before their execution) and left to swing in the air until the flesh rotted off them- a process that could take as long as two years.

Cuckold's Point

In London, Execution Dock is located on the north bank of the River Thames in Wapping; after tidal immersion, particularly notorious criminals' bodies could be hung in cages a little farther downstream at either Cuckold's Point or Blackwall Point, as a warning to other waterborne criminals of the possible consequences of their actions (such a fate befell Captain William Kidd in May 1701).
Cuckold's Point was also the location of a riverside gibbet, where the bodies of executed criminals (usually river pirates) were displayed as a deterrent to others, while it also gave its name to an adjacent shipyard during the 18th century.

William Kidd

Captain KiddCaptain William KiddWilliam "Captain" Kidd
In London, Execution Dock is located on the north bank of the River Thames in Wapping; after tidal immersion, particularly notorious criminals' bodies could be hung in cages a little farther downstream at either Cuckold's Point or Blackwall Point, as a warning to other waterborne criminals of the possible consequences of their actions (such a fate befell Captain William Kidd in May 1701).
His body was gibbeted over the River Thames at Tilbury Point – as a warning to future would-be pirates – for three years.

Marie-Josephte Corriveau

La CorriveauCorriveau
Marie-Josephte Corriveau (1733–1763), better known as "La Corriveau", is one of the most popular figures in Québécois folklore.
The tribunal found her guilty and sentenced her to hang, her body after to be "hanged in chains" (that is, put up for public display on a gibbet).

Gallows

scaffoldgallowhanging tree
A gibbet is any instrument of public execution (including guillotine, executioner's block, impalement stake, hanging gallows, or related scaffold), but gibbeting refers to the use of a gallows-type structure from which the dead or dying bodies of criminals were hung on public display to deter other existing or potential criminals.

Boudica

BoudiccaBoadiceaQueen Boadicea
Gibbeting was one of the methods said by Tacitus and Cassius Dio to have been used by Boudica's army in the massacre of Roman settlers in the destruction of Camulodunum (Colchester), Londinium (London) and Verulamium (St.
Tacitus says that the Britons had no interest in taking or selling prisoners, only in slaughter by gibbet, fire, or cross.

Execution Dock

Execution Dock, London
In London, Execution Dock is located on the north bank of the River Thames in Wapping; after tidal immersion, particularly notorious criminals' bodies could be hung in cages a little farther downstream at either Cuckold's Point or Blackwall Point, as a warning to other waterborne criminals of the possible consequences of their actions (such a fate befell Captain William Kidd in May 1701).
In the cases of the most notorious offenders, the Admiralty would order that their bodies be tarred and hung in chains at either Cuckold's Point or Blackwall Point, on the River Thames, as a warning to all seafarers of the fate awaiting those who turned to piracy.

Fort Denison

PinchgutPinchgut IslandDenison
A rocky outcrop not far into Port Jackson – originally called Mat-te-wan-ye in the local Aboriginal language, later renamed Rock Island by Governor Arthur Phillip but today known as Pinchgut Island and the location of Fort Denison – was a gibbeting site.
In late 1796 the Governor had installed a gibbet on Pinchgut.

Dule tree

Cassilis Dule Treedule treesgallowhill
They were also used as gibbets for the display of the corpse for a considerable period after such hangings.

Joseph Süß Oppenheimer

Joseph Süss OppenheimerJoseph Suss OppenheimerJud Süß
Similarly, following his execution by hanging in 1738, the corpse of Jewish financier Joseph Süß Oppenheimer was gibbeted in a human-sized bird cage that hung outside of Stuttgart on the so-called Pragsattel (the public execution place at the time) for six years, until the inauguration of Karl Eugen, Duke of Württemberg, who permitted the hasty burial of his corpse at an unknown location.
His corpse was gibbeted in a cage that hung outside of Stuttgart in the Pragsattel district for six years until the inauguration of Karl Eugen, Duke of Württemberg, who as his very first act as ruler permitted the burial of his corpse below the gallows.

Gibbet of Montfaucon

Montfaucongallows at MontfauconGallows of Montfaucon
The Gibbet of Montfaucon (Gibet de Montfaucon) was the main gallows and gibbet of the Kings of France until the time of Louis XIII of France.

Robert Aske (political leader)

Robert AskeAskeSir Robert Aske
Robert Aske, who led the rebellion against Henry VIII known as Pilgrimage of Grace, was hung in chains in 1537.
He was convicted of high treason in Westminster and was taken back to York, where he was hanged in chains on 12 July 1537, on a special scaffold erected outside Clifford's Tower.

Mark Codman

Mark
In 1755, a slave named Mark was hanged and gibbeted in Charlestown, Massachusetts; twenty years later, Paul Revere passed the remains of Mark on his famous ride.
As punishment, Mark was hanged, tarred, and his body displayed in an iron gibbet for several years after his death at a well-known spot (at the time) in present day Somerville, Massachusetts.

Gibbet Island, Bermuda

Gibbet Island
Located in Smith's Parish at the entrance to Flatt's Inlet is Gibbet Island, which was used to hang the bodies of escaped slaves as a deterrent to others.
Its name arises from the fact that runaway slaves were gibbetted, or hung here as punishment.

Bird Island (Massachusetts)

Bird IslandBird
While still under British rule, Bird Island and Nix's Mate island in Boston Harbor were used for gibbeting pirates and sailors executed for crimes in Massachusetts.
While still under British rule, Bird Island and Nix's Mate island in Boston Harbor were used for gibbeting pirates and sailors executed for crimes in Massachusetts.

Babak Khorramdin

Babak al-KhurramiBabakBabak Khoramdin
In 838, the Iranian hero Babak Khorramdin had his hands and feet cut off by the Abbasid Caliphate and was then gibbeted alive while sewn into a cow's skin with the horns at ear level to crush his head gradually as the skin dried out.
He was then gibbeted alive whilst sewn into a cow's skin with the horns at ear level to gradually crush his head as it dried out.

Perth, Tasmania

PerthPerth;
In 1837, five years after the practice had ceased in England, the body of John McKay was gibbeted near the spot where he had murdered Joseph Wilson near Perth, Tasmania.
In 1837, five years after the practice ceased in England, the body of John McKay was gibbetted near the spot where he murdered Joseph Wilson near Perth.

Nixes Mate

Nix's Mate
While still under British rule, Bird Island and Nix's Mate island in Boston Harbor were used for gibbeting pirates and sailors executed for crimes in Massachusetts.
His body was then gibbetted on Nixes Mate to serve as a warning to sailors not to turn to piracy.