Gilgit-Baltistan

Gilgit–BaltistanGilgit BaltistanNorthern AreasNorthern Areas of PakistanGilgitGilgit-Baltistan PoliceFederally Administered Northern AreasGilgit-Baltistan, PakistanNorthern Areas, PakistanNorthern Pakistan
Gilgit-Baltistan (undefined, Balti: རྒྱལ་སྐྱིད་ སྦལྟི་ཡུལ།), formerly known as the Northern Areas, is a region administered by Pakistan as an administrative territory, and constituting the northern portion of the larger Kashmir region which has been the subject of a dispute between India and Pakistan since 1947, and between India and China from somewhat later.wikipedia
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Jammu and Kashmir (union territory)

Jammu and Kashmir Jammu and KashmirJammu & Kashmir
It borders Azad Kashmir to the south, the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa to the west, the Wakhan Corridor of Afghanistan to the north, the Xinjiang region of China, to the east and northeast, and the Indian-administered union territories Jammu and Kashmir (union territory) and Ladakh to the southeast. The territory also borders Indian-administered union territories Jammu and Kashmir (union territory) and Ladakh to the south and is separated from it by the Line of Control, the de facto border between India and Pakistan.
The region of Jammu and Kashmir is separated by the Line of Control from the Pakistani-administered territories of Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan in the west and north respectively.

Administrative units of Pakistan

ProvinceRegionTerritory
It is the northernmost territory administered by Pakistan.
The administrative units of Pakistan (undefined) consist of four provinces (Balochistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Punjab, and Sindh), two autonomous territories (Azad Jammu and Kashmir, Gilgit-Baltistan) and one federal territory (Islamabad Capital Territory).

Kashmir conflict

Kashmir disputeKashmirKashmir issue
Gilgit-Baltistan is part of the greater Kashmir region, which is the subject of a long-running conflict between Pakistan and India.
Pakistan administers Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan.

Kashmir

Pakistan administered KashmirKashmir regionPakistan-administered Kashmir
Gilgit-Baltistan is part of the greater Kashmir region, which is the subject of a long-running conflict between Pakistan and India. Gilgit-Baltistan (undefined, Balti: རྒྱལ་སྐྱིད་ སྦལྟི་ཡུལ།), formerly known as the Northern Areas, is a region administered by Pakistan as an administrative territory, and constituting the northern portion of the larger Kashmir region which has been the subject of a dispute between India and Pakistan since 1947, and between India and China from somewhat later. The application of the term "administered" to the various regions of Kashmir and a mention of the Kashmir dispute is supported by the tertiary sources (a) through (d), reflecting due weight in the coverage.
Today, it denotes a larger area that includes the Indian-administered territories of Jammu and Kashmir and Ladakh, the Pakistani-administered territories of Azad Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan, and Chinese-administered territories of Aksai Chin and the Trans-Karakoram Tract.

Passu

Passu villagePassu Cones
The rock carvings found in various places in Gilgit-Baltistan, especially those found in the Passu village of Hunza, suggest a human presence since 2000 BC.
Passu is a small village located in the Gilgit Baltistan region of northern Pakistan.

Hunza Valley

HunzaHunza region
The rock carvings found in various places in Gilgit-Baltistan, especially those found in the Passu village of Hunza, suggest a human presence since 2000 BC.
Hunza (Burushaski: ہنزو, Wakhi "shina", and undefined) is a mountainous valley in the Gilgit-Baltistan region of Pakistan.

Burushaski

Burushaski languageBrushaskiBrushuski
These people are the Shina-speaking peoples of Gilgit, Chilas, Astore and Diamir while in Hunza and in the upper regions Burushaski and Khowar speakers dominate.
Burushaski is a language isolate spoken by Burusho people who reside almost entirely in northern Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan, with a few hundred speakers in northern Jammu and Kashmir, India.

Gilgit Agency

GilgitBritish Agent at Gilgit
It was formed by the amalgamation of the former Gilgit Agency, the Baltistan district and several small former princely states, the larger of which being Hunza and Nagar.
It remained in existence till about 1974, when it was abolished by the Pakistani Prime Minister Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto and made part of Federally Administered Northern Areas (later renamed to "Gilgit-Baltistan").

Line of Control

LoCTithwalChakan Da Bagh
The territory also borders Indian-administered union territories Jammu and Kashmir (union territory) and Ladakh to the south and is separated from it by the Line of Control, the de facto border between India and Pakistan.
The Pakistani-controlled part is divided into Azad Jammu and Kashmir and Gilgit–Baltistan.

Balti people

BaltiBaltisBalti Tibetans
Within the next few centuries after human settlement in the Tibetan plateau, this region became inhabited by Tibetans, who preceded the Balti people of Baltistan.
The Balti are an ethnic group of Tibetan descent with Dardic admixture who live in the Gilgit–Baltistan region of Pakistan and the Kargil region of India.

Khowar language

KhowarChitraliChitrali language
These people are the Shina-speaking peoples of Gilgit, Chilas, Astore and Diamir while in Hunza and in the upper regions Burushaski and Khowar speakers dominate.
It is spoken by the Kho people in the whole Chitral, Ghizer district of Gilgit-Baltistan (including the Gupis, Phander valley, Ishkoman, Yasen, also in Punyal and in parts of Upper Swat (Mateltan Village), Pakistan.

Gilgit

Gilgit cityGilgitiGilgit Manuscripts
Its capital city is Gilgit (population 216,760 est). Gilgit-Baltistan is administratively divided into three divisions which, in turn, are divided into ten districts, consisting of the four Baltistan districts of Skardu, Shigar, Kharmang, and Ghanche, and the four Gilgit districts of Gilgit, Ghizer, Hunza and Nagar and two districts of Diamer and Astore are part of Diamer Division.
Gilgit (Shina:, undefined) is the capital city of Gilgit-Baltistan, region of Pakistan.

Burusho people

BurushoHunzaHunza people
They referred to the region as Bruzha, a toponym that is consistent with the ethnonym "Burusho" used today.
The Burusho or Brusho, also known as the Hunza people or Botraj, live in Hunza, Nagar, Chitral, and in valleys of Gilgit–Baltistan in northern Pakistan, as well as in Jammu and Kashmir, India.

Skardu

SkardoIskardoSkardu city
Gilgit-Baltistan was ruled by many local rulers, amongst whom the Maqpon dynasty of Skardu and the Rajas of Hunza were famous.
Skardu (undefined, ) is a city in Gilgit-Baltistan region of Pakistan, and serves as the capital of Skardu District.

Feng Changqing

Great Palola was subsequently captured by the Chinese army in 753 under the military Governor Feng Changqing.
He distinguished himself under the commands of Gao and Wang Zhengjian, particularly in a battle against Greater Bolü (大勃律, near modern Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan) in 753, eventually commissioned as a military governor (jiedushi).

Pakistan

Islamic Republic of PakistanPAKPakistani
It is the northernmost territory administered by Pakistan.
A federal parliamentary republic state, Pakistan is a federation that comprises four provinces: Punjab, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Sindh and Balochistan, and three territories: Islamabad Capital Territory, Gilgit–Baltistan and Azad Kashmir.

Shina language

ShinaBurushaskiKohistani Shina
The descendants of those Dardic people can be still found today, and are believed to have maintained their Dardic culture and Shina language up to the present time.
Shina is a language from the Dardic sub-group of the Indo-Aryan family spoken by the Shina people, a plurality of the people in Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan, as well as in pockets in Jammu and Kashmir, India such as in Dah Hanu, Gurez and Dras.

Wakhan Corridor

WakhanAfghan-Pakistan borderPamir corridor
It borders Azad Kashmir to the south, the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa to the west, the Wakhan Corridor of Afghanistan to the north, the Xinjiang region of China, to the east and northeast, and the Indian-administered union territories Jammu and Kashmir (union territory) and Ladakh to the southeast.
The Broghol pass offers access to the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa region of Pakistan, while the Irshad Pass connects the corridor to Gilgit Baltistan in Azad Kashmir.

Azad Kashmir

Azad Jammu and KashmirAzad Jammu & KashmirKashmir
It borders Azad Kashmir to the south, the province of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa to the west, the Wakhan Corridor of Afghanistan to the north, the Xinjiang region of China, to the east and northeast, and the Indian-administered union territories Jammu and Kashmir (union territory) and Ladakh to the southeast.
The territory shares a border with Gilgit-Baltistan, together with which it is referred to by the United Nations and other international organisations as "Pakistan administered Kashmir".

Kargil district

KargilPurigKargil sector
The Indian forces mounted an offensive in Autumn 1948 and recaptured all of Kargil district.
It spans the entire length of Ladakh in the north-south direction, with Jammu and Kashmir to the west, the Leh district to the east and the Pakistan-administered region of Gilgit–Baltistan to the north.

Jammu and Kashmir (princely state)

Jammu and Kashmirprincely state of Jammu and KashmirKashmir and Jammu
After the defeat of the Sikhs in the First Anglo-Sikh War, the region became a part of the princely state called Jammu and Kashmir which since 1846 remained under the rule of the Dogras.
The princely state was created after the First Anglo-Sikh War, when the East India Company, which had annexed the Kashmir Valley, Jammu, Ladakh, and Gilgit-Baltistan from the Sikhs as war indemnity, then sold the region to the Raja of Jammu, Gulab Singh, for rupees 75 lakh.

Mirza Hassan Khan

Col Mirza Hassan Khan
The bloodless coup d'etat was planned by Brown to the last detail under the code name "Datta Khel", which was also joined by a rebellious section of the Jammu and Kashmir 6th Infantry under Mirza Hassan Khan.
Placed at Bunji in the Gilgit wazarat (now Astore district, Gilgit-Baltistan), Khan rebelled against the Maharaja's regime after his accession to India and participated in the overthrow of the Governor of Gilgit in November 1947.

Gilgit-Baltistan Legislative Assembly

Gilgit Baltistan Legislative AssemblyProvincial Assembly of the Gilgit-BaltistanGilgit-Baltistan Assembly
The order granted self-rule to the people of Gilgit-Baltistan, by creating, among other things, an elected Gilgit-Baltistan Legislative Assembly and Gilgit-Baltistan Council.
The Gilgit-Baltistan Legislative Assembly is a 33-seat unicameral legislative body that was formed as part of the Gilgit-Baltistan Empowerment and Self-Governance Order, 2009 which granted the region self-rule and an elected legislative assembly.

Hunza (princely state)

HunzaState of HunzaHunza Princely State
It was formed by the amalgamation of the former Gilgit Agency, the Baltistan district and several small former princely states, the larger of which being Hunza and Nagar. Gilgit-Baltistan was ruled by many local rulers, amongst whom the Maqpon dynasty of Skardu and the Rajas of Hunza were famous.
Hunza covered territory now forming the northernmost part of Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan.

Skardu District

SkarduDistrict SkarduPari, Gilgit Baltistan
Gilgit-Baltistan is administratively divided into three divisions which, in turn, are divided into ten districts, consisting of the four Baltistan districts of Skardu, Shigar, Kharmang, and Ghanche, and the four Gilgit districts of Gilgit, Ghizer, Hunza and Nagar and two districts of Diamer and Astore are part of Diamer Division.
Skardu District (undefined) is a district of Pakistan administered region of Gilgit–Baltistan.