Gillian Freeman

Gillian Freeman (born 5 December 1929) is a British writer.wikipedia
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Matilda Thorpe

They have two daughters, the actresses Harriet Thorpe and Matilda Thorpe.
Thorpe was born in Wood Green, the daughter of writers Gillian Freeman and Edward Thorpe.

The Leather Boys

One of her best known books was the 1961 novel The Leather Boys (published under the pseudonym Eliot George, a reference to the writer George Eliot), a story of a gay relationship between two young working-class men, later turned into a film for which she wrote the screenplay, this time under her own name.
The film is based on a novel commissioned by the London literary agent and publisher Anthony Blond, who suggested that Gillian Freeman write about a "Romeo and Romeo in the South London suburbs".

That Cold Day in the Park

film of the same name
That Cold Day in the Park (screenplay), 1969
Based on the novel of the same name by Peter Miles and adapted for the screen by Gillian Freeman, it was filmed on location in Vancouver, British Columbia, where the events occur.

The Undergrowth of Literature

Her non-fiction book The Undergrowth of Literature (1967), was a pioneering study of pornography.
The Undergrowth of Literature is a pioneering study of pornography written by the British author Gillian Freeman in 1967.

Mayerling (ballet)

MayerlingMayerling'' (1978)Mayerling'' (ballet)
Mayerling (ballet scenario), 1978
Mayerling was first produced for the Royal Ballet in 1978, by the British choreographer Sir Kenneth Macmillan, with a scenario written by Gillian Freeman, scenery and costume designs by Nicholas Georgiadis and lighting design by David Hersey.

I Want What I Want (film)

I Want What I Wanta film by the same title
I Want What I Want (screenplay), 1972

Angela Brazil

A Popular Schoolgirl
The Schoolgirl Ethic: The Life and Work of Angela Brazil, 1976
The Schoolgirl Ethic: The Life and Work of Angela Brazil. Gillian Freeman, 1976

University of Reading

ReadingReading UniversityUniversity College
Born to Jewish parents Dr. Jack Freeman and his wife Freda (née Davids) in North London, she graduated in English Language and Literature from the University of Reading in 1951.

Harriet Thorpe

They have two daughters, the actresses Harriet Thorpe and Matilda Thorpe.

George Eliot

EliotEliot, GeorgeGeorge Elliot
One of her best known books was the 1961 novel The Leather Boys (published under the pseudonym Eliot George, a reference to the writer George Eliot), a story of a gay relationship between two young working-class men, later turned into a film for which she wrote the screenplay, this time under her own name.

Anthony Blond

AnthonyBlond
The novel was commissioned by the publisher Anthony Blond, who wanted a story about a "Romeo and Romeo in the South London suburbs".

Bloomsbury Group

BloomsburyBloomsbury SetBloombury philosopher
Her most recent book is But Nobody Lives in Bloomsbury (2006), a fictional study of the Bloomsbury Group.

Only Lovers Left Alive

1964 science fiction novel2013 film
Only Lovers Left Alive (screenplay), 1965

Shena Mackay

An Evasion of Women (short play, alongside pieces by Shena Mackay, Margaret Drabble, and Maureen Duffy), 1969

Margaret Drabble

Drabble, MargaretDame Margaret DrabbleDrabble
An Evasion of Women (short play, alongside pieces by Shena Mackay, Margaret Drabble, and Maureen Duffy), 1969

Maureen Duffy

Duffy, MaureenReturn to top of page
An Evasion of Women (short play, alongside pieces by Shena Mackay, Margaret Drabble, and Maureen Duffy), 1969

String Quartet No. 2 (Janáček)

Intimate LettersString Quartet No. 2Janáček's Second String Quartet
Intimate Letters (ballet scenario), 1978

Catsuits and bodysuits in popular media

The Avengers: Cathy Gale (played by Honor Blackman, better known for the role of Pussy Galore in Goldfinger) wore black leather catsuits that took four-hour fitting sessions for the shooting. She opted for the leather as her clothes were getting repeatedly ripped off during fight scenes, including one scene that had her trousers ripped in close-up. Her fetishistic garb was identified as a reason behind The Avengers entry into cult status. Emma Peel (played by Diana Rigg) wore a number of black leather catsuits during the monochrome series, but then switched to wearing colorful psychedelic jumpsuits as the show entered Technicolor. Emma Peel's black leather catsuit was identified as a precursor to the popularity of leather, spandex and vinyl bodysuits in subcultures such as Punk and Leathermen. Her character has been described as the inspiration for most iconic bodysuit-clad female characters that followed, including the Catwoman, Monica Vitti in Modesty Blaise, Jane Fonda in Barbarella, and Marianne Faithfull in Girl on a Motorcycle. The catsuits and fashion paraphernalia in The Avengers, including the leather boots, kept the youth "at home on Saturday nights" according to The Spectator. Novelist and social analyst Gillian Freeman attributed this popularity to the "kinkiness" of the attire of Gale and Peel in The Undergrowth of Literature, her seminal study on pornography.

Ken Howard (composer)

Ken HowardHoward
He also joined forces with two old UCS friends, Alan Blaikley and Paul Overy, with whom, between 1962 and 1963, he ran and edited four issues of a magazine, Axle Quarterly, publishing early work by Melvyn Bragg, Ray Gosling, Alexis Lykiard, Gillian Freeman and Simon Raven amongst others.

London Consequences

The interior chapters are by Rayner Heppenstall, Eva Figes, Gillian Freeman, Jane Gaskell, Wilson Harris, Olivia Manning, Adrian Mitchell, Paul Ableman, John Bowen, Melvyn Bragg, Vincent Brome, Peter Buckman, Alan Burns, Barry Cole, Julian Mitchell, Andrea Newman, Piers Paul Read and Stefan Themerson.

Alan Blaikley

Blaikley
After coming down from university, he joined forces with two old UCS friends Ken Howard and Paul Overy with whom, between 1962 and 1963, he ran and edited four issues of a magazine, Axle Quarterly, publishing early work by Melvyn Bragg, Ray Gosling, Alexis Lykiard, Gillian Freeman and Simon Raven, among others.

Fetish magazine

fetish magazinesmagazines
An early study, The Undergrowth of Literature by Gillian Freeman (1967), concluded that such magazines provide a catharsis for those whose sexual needs are otherwise unsatisfied: she identified rubberwear magazines as the most popular at the time.

Rayner Heppenstall

London Consequences (1972) with Margaret Drabble, B. S. Johnson, Eva Figes, Gillian Freeman, Jane Gaskell, Wilson Harris, Olivia Manning, Adrian Mitchell, Paul Ableman, John Bowen, Melvyn Bragg, Vincent Brome, Peter Buckman, Alan Burns, Barry Cole, Julian Mitchell, Andrea Newman, Piers Paul Read and Stefan Themerson.