Giovanni Boccaccio

BoccaccioBoccacioGiovanni BocaccioBocaccioBoccaceBoccaccianBoccaccio’sJohn Bocace
Giovanni Boccaccio (, ; 16 June 1313 – 21 December 1375) was an Italian writer, poet, correspondent of Petrarch, and an important Renaissance humanist.wikipedia
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The Decameron

DecameronDecameronePampinea
Boccaccio wrote a number of notable works, including The Decameron and On Famous Women.
The Decameron (Decameron or Decamerone ), subtitled Prince Galehaut (Old Prencipe Galeotto ) and sometimes nicknamed l'Umana commedia ("the Human comedy"), is a collection of novellas by the 14th-century Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio (1313–1375).

Petrarch

Francesco PetrarcaPetrarcaFrancesco Petrarch
Giovanni Boccaccio (, ; 16 June 1313 – 21 December 1375) was an Italian writer, poet, correspondent of Petrarch, and an important Renaissance humanist.
In the 16th century, Pietro Bembo created the model for the modern Italian language based on Petrarch's works, as well as those of Giovanni Boccaccio, and, to a lesser extent, Dante Alighieri.

Florence

FlorentineFlorence, ItalyFirenze
He was born in Florence or in a village near Certaldo where his family was from.
The Florentine dialect forms the base of Standard Italian and it became the language of culture throughout Italy due to the prestige of the masterpieces by Dante Alighieri, Petrarch, Giovanni Boccaccio, Niccolò Machiavelli and Francesco Guicciardini.

Dante Alighieri

DanteDante’sDantean
Boccaccio may have been tutored by Giovanni Mazzuoli and received from him an early introduction to the works of Dante.
His Divine Comedy, originally called Comedìa (modern Italian: Commedia) and later christened Divina by Giovanni Boccaccio, is widely considered the most important poem of the Middle Ages and the greatest literary work in the Italian language.

Tuscan dialect

TuscanTuscan languageTuscan vernacular
He wrote his imaginative literature mostly in Tuscan vernacular, as well as other works in Latin, and is particularly noted for his realistic dialogue which differed from that of his contemporaries, medieval writers who usually followed formulaic models for character and plot.
Standard Italian is based on Tuscan, specifically on its Florentine dialect, and it became the language of culture throughout Italy due to the prestige of the works by Dante Alighieri, Petrarch, Giovanni Boccaccio, Niccolò Machiavelli, and Francesco Guicciardini.

Renaissance humanism

humanistRenaissance humanisthumanists
Giovanni Boccaccio (, ; 16 June 1313 – 21 December 1375) was an Italian writer, poet, correspondent of Petrarch, and an important Renaissance humanist.
Some of the first humanists were great collectors of antique manuscripts, including Petrarch, Giovanni Boccaccio, Coluccio Salutati, and Poggio Bracciolini.

Maria d'Aquino

Fiammetta
At this time, he fell in love with a married daughter of the king, who is portrayed as "Fiammetta" in many of Boccaccio's prose romances, including Il Filocolo (1338).
Maria d'Aquino (died in 1382) was a Neapolitan noblewoman who is traditionally identified with Giovanni Boccaccio's beloved and muse Fiammetta (Italian for "little flame").

Naples

Naples, ItalyNapoliNeapolitan
In 1326, his father was appointed head of a bank and moved with his family to Naples.
Despite the split, Naples grew in importance, attracting Pisan and Genoese merchants, Tuscan bankers, and some of the most prominent Renaissance artists of the time, such as Boccaccio, Petrarch and Giotto.

Dionigi di Borgo San Sepolcro

Dionysius of Borgo San Sepolcro
His early influences included Paolo da Perugia (a curator and author of a collection of myths called the Collectiones), humanists Barbato da Sulmona and Giovanni Barrili, and theologian Dionigi di Borgo San Sepolcro.
Dionigi di Borgo San Sepolcro OESA (Roberti of Roberti, Dennis) (c. 1300 – 31 March 1342) was an Augustinian monk who was at one time Petrarch's confessor, and who taught Boccaccio at the beginning of his education in the humanities.

Certaldo

He was born in Florence or in a village near Certaldo where his family was from.
It was home to the family of Giovanni Boccaccio, author of the Decameron.

Joanna I of Naples

Joanna IJoan I of NaplesJoan I
Acciaioli later became counselor to Queen Joanna I of Naples and, eventually, her Grand Seneschal.
Sancia and Philippa were the most influential personalities in the court of Robert who did not make decisions without their consent, according to Boccaccio.

Medieval literature

medievalliteratureMedieval European literature
He wrote his imaginative literature mostly in Tuscan vernacular, as well as other works in Latin, and is particularly noted for his realistic dialogue which differed from that of his contemporaries, medieval writers who usually followed formulaic models for character and plot.

The Knight's Tale

KnightKnight's TaleThe Knight
Works produced in this period include Il Filostrato and Teseida (the sources for Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and The Knight's Tale, respectively), The Filocolo (a prose version of an existing French romance), and La caccia di Diana (a poem in terza rima listing Neapolitan women).
The epic poem Teseida (full title Teseida delle Nozze d’Emilia, or "The Theseid, Concerning the Nuptials of Emily") by Giovanni Boccaccio is the source of the tale, although Chaucer makes many significant diversions from that poem.

Troilus and Criseyde

Troilus
Works produced in this period include Il Filostrato and Teseida (the sources for Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and The Knight's Tale, respectively), The Filocolo (a prose version of an existing French romance), and La caccia di Diana (a poem in terza rima listing Neapolitan women).
The first known version is from Benoît de Sainte-Maure's poem Roman de Troie, but Chaucer's principal source appears to have been Boccaccio who re-wrote the tale in his Il Filostrato.

Corbaccio

It was Boccaccio's final effort in literature and one of his last works in Tuscan vernacular; the only other substantial work was Corbaccio (dated to either 1355 or 1365).
Il Corbaccio, or "The Crow", is an Italian literary work by Giovanni Boccaccio, traditionally dated c. 1355.

De Mulieribus Claris

On Famous WomenFamous WomenDe Claris Mulieribus
Boccaccio wrote a number of notable works, including The Decameron and On Famous Women.
De Mulieribus Claris or De Claris Mulieribus (Latin for "Concerning Famous Women") is a collection of biographies of historical and mythological women by the Florentine author Giovanni Boccaccio, composed in 136162.

Terza rima

Works produced in this period include Il Filostrato and Teseida (the sources for Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde and The Knight's Tale, respectively), The Filocolo (a prose version of an existing French romance), and La caccia di Diana (a poem in terza rima listing Neapolitan women).
Inspired by Dante, other Italian poets, including Petrarch and Boccaccio, began using the form.

Black Death

plagueBlack PlagueGreat Plague
The city was hurt further in 1348 by the Black Death, which killed some three-quarters of the city's population, later represented in the Decameron.
Boccaccio's description:

Elegia di Madonna Fiammetta

FiammettaFiammetta'' (novel)Lady Fiammeta
Boccaccio continued to work, although dissatisfied with his return to Florence, producing Comedia delle ninfe fiorentine in 1341 (also known as Ameto), a mix of prose and poems, completing the fifty-canto allegorical poem Amorosa visione in 1342, and Fiammetta in 1343.
Elegia di Madonna Fiammetta, or The Elegy of Lady Fiammetta in English, is a novel by the Italian writer Giovanni Boccaccio, probably written between 1343 and 1344.

Vernacular

vernacular languagevernacular languagesvernacularization
He wrote his imaginative literature mostly in Tuscan vernacular, as well as other works in Latin, and is particularly noted for his realistic dialogue which differed from that of his contemporaries, medieval writers who usually followed formulaic models for character and plot.
In the early 15th century a number of glossaries appeared, such as that of Lucillo Minerbi on Boccaccio in 1535, and those of Fabrizio Luna on Ariosto, Petrarca, Boccaccio and Dante in 1536.

Robert, King of Naples

Robert of NaplesRobert of AnjouRobert
His father introduced him to the Neapolitan nobility and the French-influenced court of Robert the Wise (the king of Naples) in the 1330s.
He was remembered by Petrarch and Boccaccio as a cultured man and a generous patron of the arts, "unique among the kings of our day," Boccaccio claimed after Robert's death, "a friend of knowledge and virtue."

Niccolò Acciaioli

Niccolò AcciaiuoliNiccolo AcciaiuoliNiccolo Acciaioli
Boccaccio became a friend of fellow Florentine Niccolò Acciaioli, and benefited from his influence as the administrator, and perhaps the lover, of Catherine of Valois-Courtenay, widow of Philip I of Taranto.
A lover of art and letters, he was a friend and protector of Petrarch and Boccaccio.

Amorosa visione

Amorosa visione (1342, revised c. 1365) is a narrative poem by Boccaccio, full of echoes of the Divine Comedy and consisting of 50 canti in terza rima.

De Casibus Virorum Illustrium

Concerning the Falls of Illustrious MenDu cas des nobles hommes et femmesOn the Fates of Illustrious Men
De Casibus Virorum Illustrium (On the Fates of Famous Men) is a work of 56 biographies in Latin prose composed by the Florentine poet Giovanni Boccaccio of Certaldo in the form of moral stories of the falls of famous people, similar to his work of 106 biographies De Mulieribus Claris.

Santo Spirito, Florence

Santo SpiritoBasilica di Santo SpiritoBasilica of Santa Maria del Santo Spirito
However, upon Boccaccio's death, his entire collection was given to the monastery of Santo Spirito, in Florence, where it still resides.
One of the groups, led by Boccaccio, gathered there in 1360s and 1370s.