Giovio Series

Giovio Collection
The Giovio Series, also known as the Giovio Collection or Giovio Portraits, is a series of 484 portraits assembled by the 16th-century Italian Renaissance historian and biographer Paolo Giovio.wikipedia
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Paolo Giovio

Paulus JoviusPaolo Giovio (il Vecchio)Giovio
The Giovio Series, also known as the Giovio Collection or Giovio Portraits, is a series of 484 portraits assembled by the 16th-century Italian Renaissance historian and biographer Paolo Giovio.
A set of copies of the paintings from the collection, now known as the Giovio Series, is on display in the Uffizi Gallery.

Cristofano dell'Altissimo

Cristofano dell' Altissimo
Artist Cristofano dell'Altissimo spent 37 years copying the portraits, working from 1552 to 1589.
For duke Cosimo I de' Medici he copied in Como at least 280 of the portraits from the Collection of Paolo Giovio known as the Giovio Series (484 in total).

Portrait

portraitsportraitistportraiture
The Giovio Series, also known as the Giovio Collection or Giovio Portraits, is a series of 484 portraits assembled by the 16th-century Italian Renaissance historian and biographer Paolo Giovio.

Renaissance

the RenaissanceEarly RenaissanceEuropean Renaissance
The Giovio Series, also known as the Giovio Collection or Giovio Portraits, is a series of 484 portraits assembled by the 16th-century Italian Renaissance historian and biographer Paolo Giovio.

Archive

archivesarchivalfilm archive
Intended by Giovio as a public archive of famous men, the collection was originally housed in a specially-built museum on the shore of Lake Como.

Museum

museumsHistory museummilitary museum
Intended by Giovio as a public archive of famous men, the collection was originally housed in a specially-built museum on the shore of Lake Como.

Lake Como

ComoLarioLago di Como
Intended by Giovio as a public archive of famous men, the collection was originally housed in a specially-built museum on the shore of Lake Como.

Cosimo I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany

Cosimo I de' MediciCosimo ICosimo I de Medici
Although the original collection has not survived intact, a set of copies made for Cosimo I de' Medici now has a permanent home in Florence's Uffizi Gallery.

Florence

FlorentineFlorence, ItalyFirenze
Although the original collection has not survived intact, a set of copies made for Cosimo I de' Medici now has a permanent home in Florence's Uffizi Gallery.

Uffizi

Uffizi GalleryGalleria degli UffiziUffizi Palace
Although the original collection has not survived intact, a set of copies made for Cosimo I de' Medici now has a permanent home in Florence's Uffizi Gallery.

Como

Como, ItalyComumPonte Chiasso
Giovio first began collecting portraits around 1512, soon after leaving his hometown of Como to pursue his career in Rome.

Art museum

art galleryart galleriesgallery
Giovio intended his gallery to serve as a permanent public record, and so was scrupulous about its accuracy.

Coin

coinsspecieexergue
In the absence of such, likenesses produced from coins, busts, or earlier life portraits were acceptable.

Bust (sculpture)

bustbustsportrait bust
In the absence of such, likenesses produced from coins, busts, or earlier life portraits were acceptable.

Bribery

bribebribesbribing
His correspondence reveals that he bargained, cajoled and even bribed subjects for pictures, many of which he paid for himself.

Renaissance humanism

humanistRenaissance humanisthumanists
The inspirational value of collections of portraits was a familiar Renaissance trope, consciously revived from Antique precedents: as the humanist Poggio Bracciolini had written in his essay De nobilitate liber, the Romans should be emulated, "for they believed that the images of men who had excelled in the pursuit of glory and wisdom, if placed before the eyes, would help ennoble and stir up the soul."

Poggio Bracciolini

Gian Francesco Poggio BraccioliniPoggioBracciolini, Poggio
The inspirational value of collections of portraits was a familiar Renaissance trope, consciously revived from Antique precedents: as the humanist Poggio Bracciolini had written in his essay De nobilitate liber, the Romans should be emulated, "for they believed that the images of men who had excelled in the pursuit of glory and wisdom, if placed before the eyes, would help ennoble and stir up the soul."

Nine Worthies

Female WorthiesNine HeroesNine Worthies of Antiquity
Examples of similar collections can be traced to the early 14th century, and to less universal sets of the "Nine Worthies" and literary reports of the busts of philosophers in Roman libraries, such as Pliny's, to "...images made of bronze... set up in libraries in honour of those whose immortal spirits talk to us in the same places."

Antiquarian

antiquaryantiquariansantiquaries
The 1517 Illustrium imagines of the antiquarian Andrea Fulvio, which paired short biographies with woodcut portraits drawn from coins, was one of the few similar contemporary works.

Andrea Fulvio

The 1517 Illustrium imagines of the antiquarian Andrea Fulvio, which paired short biographies with woodcut portraits drawn from coins, was one of the few similar contemporary works.

Woodcut

woodcutswoodblockxylography
The 1517 Illustrium imagines of the antiquarian Andrea Fulvio, which paired short biographies with woodcut portraits drawn from coins, was one of the few similar contemporary works.

Lost work

lost lostlost works
The lost Imagines of Varro, an illustrated set of some 700 famous figures of the ancient world, may also have inspired Giovio.

Marcus Terentius Varro

VarroMarcus VarroVarro Reatinus
The lost Imagines of Varro, an illustrated set of some 700 famous figures of the ancient world, may also have inspired Giovio.

Painted frieze of the Bodleian Library

Nowell Myres pointed out in one of his articles on the frieze that such instructive decoration by portraits in a library or museum was well known from the Giovio Series.

De viris illustribus

De Viris Illustribus Romaeabout famous peopleLet us now praise famous men
The Giovio Series of portraits of literary figures, rulers, statesmen and other dignitaries, many of which were done from life, was assembled by Renaissance historian and biographer Paolo Giovio (1483–1552) but subsequently lost.