A report on Penis and Glans penis

Mallard pseudo-penis
Human glans penis (dorsal view)
Females have corkscrew vaginas with many blind pockets designed for difficult penetration and to prevent becoming pregnant. This reduced the likelihood of fertilization by unwanted aggressors in favor of fitter mates.
The male anatomy showing the location of the glans penis
External male genitalia of a Labrador Retriever
Internal anatomy of human glans penis: 1. Fascia penis 2. Corpus cavernosum 3. Coronal sulcus 4. Corona of glans 5. Foreskin 6. Glans penis 7. Meatus of the urethra 8. Navicular fossa of male urethra 9. Tunica albuginea of penis 10. Corpus spongiosum 11. Urethra
Penises of minke whales on display at the Icelandic Phallological Museum
Genitorinary system of a raccoon (Procyon lotor)
Penis of a human, with pubic hair removed to show anatomical detail
The spine-covered penis of Callosobruchus analis, a bean weevil

In comparison, the glans of felids is short and spiny, while that of viverrids is smooth and long.

- Glans penis

Glans: the free end of the penis.

- Penis
Mallard pseudo-penis

8 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Three columns of erectile tissue make up most of the volume of the penis.

Erection

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Three columns of erectile tissue make up most of the volume of the penis.
8 stages of erection
Various erection angle and shape of penises.
An erect horse penis

An erection (clinically: penile erection or penile tumescence) is a physiological phenomenon in which the penis becomes firm, engorged, and enlarged.

Generally, in uncircumcised males, the foreskin automatically and gradually retracts, exposing the glans, though some people may have to manually retract their foreskin.

Transverse section of the penis.

Corpus cavernosum penis

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Transverse section of the penis.
Structure of the penis
The deeper branches of the internal pudendal artery.
The penis in transverse section, showing the bloodvessels.
Male pelvic organs seen from right side.
Diagram of the arteries of the penis.
Cross section of penis.
Medical ultrasonography of a normal penis.

A corpus cavernosum penis (singular) (literally "cave-like body" of the penis, plural corpora cavernosa) is one of a pair of sponge-like regions of erectile tissue, which contain most of the blood in the penis during an erection.

The male anatomy has no vestibular bulbs, but instead a corpus spongiosum, a smaller region along the bottom of the penis, which contains the urethra and forms the glans penis.

A flaccid penis, with surrounding pubic hair removed to show anatomical detail

Human penis

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External male intromittent organ that additionally serves as the urinal duct.

External male intromittent organ that additionally serves as the urinal duct.

A flaccid penis, with surrounding pubic hair removed to show anatomical detail
Lateral cross section of the penis
Anatomical diagram of a human penis
Various sized penises
Stages in the development of the male external genitalia
A urinating puer mingens by Annibale Carracci, 1600, Palazzo Farnese
The development of a penile erection, also showing the foreskin gradually retracting over the glans. 
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See also: Commons image gallery''
A ventral view of a penis flaccid (left) and erect (middle); a dorsal view of a penis erect (right).
Hypospadias
Kanamara Matsuri festival in Japan
Papuan man wearing traditional penis sheath
A labelled dorsal view of a circumcised penis: (1) Shaft, (2) Circumcision scar, (3) Corona, (4) Glans, (5) Meatus.
Dissection showing the fascia of the penis as well as several surrounding structures
Image showing innervation and blood-supply of the human male external genitalia

The main parts are the root (radix); the body (corpus); and the epithelium of the penis including the shaft skin and the foreskin (prepuce) covering the glans penis.

The internal anatomy of the human vulva, with the clitoral hood and labia minora indicated as lines. The clitoris extends from the visible portion to a point below the pubic bone.

Clitoris

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Female sex organ present in mammals, ostriches and a limited number of other animals.

Female sex organ present in mammals, ostriches and a limited number of other animals.

The internal anatomy of the human vulva, with the clitoral hood and labia minora indicated as lines. The clitoris extends from the visible portion to a point below the pubic bone.
Stages in the development of the clitoris
Created by Helen O'Connell using MRI, the first 3D image of a clitoris in an erect state with the adjacent organs of the uterus and urinary bladder
Clitoris; deep dissection
A partially exposed clitoral glans, which can't be fully exposed due to a mild case of adhesions to the clitoral hood
Structures of the vulva, including external and internal parts of the clitoris
The clitoral hood has a normal anatomical variation in size and appearance in different adult women: while it is completely covered by the labia majora in some women, standing with their legs closed, in others it is pronounced and clearly visible.
Clitoral hood (1) and clitoris (2). Labia are spread apart on the bottom image.
An enlarged clitoris due to clitoromegaly
De re anatomica
A Georg Ludwig Kobelt illustration of the anatomy of the clitoris
Girl protesting for clitoris-awareness at a women's rights rally in Paris, 2019
With a urogenital system in which the female urinates, mates and gives birth via an enlarged, erectile clitoris, female spotted hyenas are the only female mammals devoid of an external vaginal opening.
Male and female reproductive systems of the spotted hyena, from Schmotzer & Zimmerman, Anatomischer Anzeiger (1922). Abb. 1 (Fig. 1.) Male reproductive anatomy. Abb. 2 (Fig. 2.) Female reproductive anatomy. Principal abbreviations (from Schmotzer & Zimmerman) are: T, testis; Vd, vas deferens; BU, urethral bulb; Ur, urethra; R, rectum; P, penis; S, scrotum; O, ovary; FT, tuba Fallopii; RL, ligament uteri; Ut, uterus; CC, Corpus clitoris. Remaining abbreviations, in alphabetical order, are: AG, parotid analis; B, vesica urinaria; CG, parotid Cowperi; CP, Corpus penis; CS, corpus spongiosum; GC, glans; GP, glans penis; LA, levator ani muscle; Pr, prepuce; RC, musculus retractor clitoris; RP, Musculus retractor penis; UCG, Canalis urogenital.

Unlike the penis, the male homologue (equivalent) to the clitoris, it usually does not contain the distal portion (or opening) of the urethra and is therefore not used for urination.

She argued that "the male clitoris" is directly beneath the rim of the glans penis, where the frenulum of prepuce of the penis (a fold of the prepuce) is located, and proposed that this area be called the "Lownde's crown".

A stallion

Stallion

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Male horse that has not been gelded .

Male horse that has not been gelded .

A stallion
Mustang stallion (right) with part of his band of mares and foals
Stallion exhibiting the flehmen response
Genitourinary system of a stallion
A stallion's secondary characteristics include heavier muscling for a given breed than is seen in mares or geldings, often with considerable development along the crest of the neck, as shown in this image.
Even well-trained stallions require firm and consistent handling by experienced individuals.
Aggressive and even violent behavior between stallions not habitually living together or in the presence of mares adds to the challenges in stallion management.
Provided with sufficient space and food with no distractions from mares in estrus, even stallions previously used for breeding may coexist peacefully. Not all individuals are suited for this kind of arrangement, however.
Stallions are capable of achieving a high level of discipline and training.

the penis, within the "penile sheath". Stallions have a vascular penis. When non-erect, it is quite flaccid and contained within the sheath. The retractor penis muscle is relatively underdeveloped. Erection and protrusion take place gradually, by the increasing tumescence of the erectile vascular tissue in the corpus cavernosum penis. When not erect, the penis is housed within the prepuce, 50 cm long and 2.5 to 6 cm in diameter with the distal end 15 to 20 cm. The retractor muscle contracts to retract the penis into the sheath and relaxes to allow the penis to extend from the sheath. When erect, the penis doubles in length and thickness and the glans increases by 3 to 4 times. The urethra opens within the urethral fossa, a small pouch at the distal end of the glans. A structure called the urethral process projects beyond the glans.

Lower Parts of the Genital and Urinary Tracts in the Male

Corpus spongiosum (penis)

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Lower Parts of the Genital and Urinary Tracts in the Male
Structure of the penis
The penis in transverse section, showing the blood vessels.
Diagram of the arteries of the penis.
Vertical section of bladder, penis, and urethra.
Cross section of penis
Transverse section of the penis.
The constituent cavernous cylinders of the penis.
Medical ultrasonography of a normal penis.

The corpus spongiosum is the mass of spongy tissue surrounding the male urethra within the penis.

This expansion, termed the glans penis, is moulded on the rounded ends of the corpus cavernosum penis, extending farther on their upper than on their lower surfaces.

Penile spines

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Many mammalian species have developed keratinized penile spines along the glans and/or shaft, which may be involved in sexual selection.

Upon withdrawal of a cat's penis, the spines rake the walls of the female's vagina, which may serve as a trigger for ovulation.

Manneken Pis depicts a urinating boy (puer mingens).

Urination

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Release of urine from the urinary bladder through the urethra to the outside of the body.

Release of urine from the urinary bladder through the urethra to the outside of the body.

Manneken Pis depicts a urinating boy (puer mingens).
The interior of the bladder
Male dog using urine to mark a spot with his scent.
Urinating woman
Urinating man
Painting showing the physician Constantine the African accepting urine samples for diagnosis
Location of external urethral orifice in adult human male
Location of the bladder and urethra in adult human female (sagittal section)
Woodcut of a puer mingens, from the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, 1499
Public toilet outside the Philadelphia City Hall
Indecency, 1799 by Cruikshank
Woman Urinating, etching, Rembrandt van Rijn, 1631
A man uses a urinal while urinating in a standing position.
Body position taken by a woman for urination into many female urinals: floating half squat or "skier position".
Urination in Greek antique art: Hetaera urinating into a skyphos
A horse urinating while in formation with the Queens Guards
A maned wolf urinating on a tree to mark his territory
A cheetah marking a tree with urine
Jeanneke Pis

In placental mammals, urine is drained through the urinary meatus, a urethral opening in the male penis or female vulval vestibule.

Within the Felidae, males can urinate backwards by curving the tip of the glans penis backward.