Glenn Ford

Gwyllyn Samuel Newton "Glenn" Ford (May 1, 1916 – August 30, 2006) was a Canadian-American actor whose prolific career lasted more than 50 years.wikipedia
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Columbia Pictures

ColumbiaColumbia Pictures CorporationColumbia TriStar
Ford acted in West Coast stage companies before joining Columbia Pictures in 1939.
Rosalind Russell, Glenn Ford, and William Holden also became major stars at the studio.

So Ends Our Night

Top Hollywood director John Cromwell was impressed enough with his work to borrow him from Columbia for the independently produced drama, So Ends Our Night (1941), where Ford delivered a poignant portrayal of a 19-year-old German exile on the run in Nazi-occupied Europe.
So Ends Our Night is a 1941 drama starring Fredric March, Margaret Sullavan and Glenn Ford, and directed by John Cromwell.

Classical Hollywood cinema

Golden AgeGolden Age of HollywoodHollywood's Golden Age
He was most prominent during Hollywood's Golden Age.
Glenn Ford

Destroyer (1943 film)

DestroyerDestroyer'' (1943 film)
Then, while making another war drama, Destroyer, with Edward G. Robinson, an ardent anti-Fascist, Glenn impulsively volunteered for the United States Marine Corps Reserve on December 13, 1942.
Destroyer is a 1943 Columbia Pictures war film starring Edward G. Robinson and Glenn Ford as United States Navy sailors in World War II.

Rita Hayworth

HayworthCheetah HayworthRita Cansino
The most memorable role of Ford's career came with his first postwar film in 1946, starring alongside Rita Hayworth in Gilda.
Hayworth is perhaps best known for her performance in the 1946 film noir, Gilda, opposite Glenn Ford, in which she played the femme fatale in her first major dramatic role.

Flight Lieutenant (film)

Flight Lieutenant
Ten months after Ford's portrait of a young anti-Nazi exile, the United States entered World War II. After playing a young pilot in his 11th Columbia film, Flight Lieutenant (1942), Ford went on a cross-country 12-city tour to sell war bonds for Army and Navy Relief.
Flight Lieutenant is a 1942 film starring Pat O'Brien as Sam Doyle, a disgraced commercial pilot who works to regain the respect of his son (Glenn Ford) against the backdrop of World War II.

Gilda

eponymous film
The most memorable role of Ford's career came with his first postwar film in 1946, starring alongside Rita Hayworth in Gilda.
Gilda is a 1946 American film noir directed by Charles Vidor and starring Rita Hayworth in her signature role as the ultimate femme fatale and Glenn Ford as a young thug.

William Holden

Bill Holden
Set after the Civil War, it paired him with another young male star under contract, Bill Holden, who became a lifelong friend.
He did another Western at Columbia, Texas (1941) with Glenn Ford, and a musical comedy at Paramount, The Fleet's In (1942) with Eddie Bracken, Dorothy Lamour and Betty Hutton.

The Big Heat

of the same nameThe Big Heat#Based on a serial by WiThe Big Heat
He instead continued to bring in solid performances in thrillers, dramas, and action films such as A Stolen Life with Bette Davis, memorable film noir: The Big Heat directed by Hitler refugee Fritz Lang, co-starring Gloria Grahame, and reteamed with the same in the following year in Human Desire, loosely based on La Bete Humaine, the 1870 Emile Zola novel.
The Big Heat is a 1953 film noir directed by Fritz Lang, starring Glenn Ford, Gloria Grahame and Jocelyn Brando, and featuring Lee Marvin.

Sainte-Christine-d'Auvergne, Quebec

Sainte-Christine-d'Auvergnethe municipality of Sainte-Christine-d'Auvergne
Gwyllyn Samuel Newton Ford was born on May 1, 1916 in Sainte-Christine-d'Auvergne, Quebec, the son of Hannah Wood (née Mitchell) and Newton Ford, an engineer with the Canadian Pacific Railway.
It is the place where the Canadian-American actor Glenn Ford was born in 1916.

The Lady in Question

This was Glenn Ford's second pairing with Hayworth; his first was in The Lady In Question (1940), a well-received courtroom drama in which Glenn plays a boy who falls in love with Rita Hayworth when his father, Brian Aherne, tries to rehabilitate her in their bicycle shop.
The Lady in Question is a 1940 American comedy drama film directed by Charles Vidor and starring Brian Aherne, Rita Hayworth and Glenn Ford.

A Stolen Life (1946 film)

A Stolen LifeA Stolen Life'' (1946 film)
He instead continued to bring in solid performances in thrillers, dramas, and action films such as A Stolen Life with Bette Davis, memorable film noir: The Big Heat directed by Hitler refugee Fritz Lang, co-starring Gloria Grahame, and reteamed with the same in the following year in Human Desire, loosely based on La Bete Humaine, the 1870 Emile Zola novel.
The supporting cast includes Glenn Ford, Dane Clark, Peggy Knudsen, Charlie Ruggles, and Bruce Bennett (formerly "Herman Brix").

Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse (film)

Four Horsemen of the ApocalypseThe Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse1962
Framed, Experiment in Terror with Lee Remick, and Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse were other dramas, often expensive and high-profile projects, if not always profitable, from the studio.
The 4 Horsemen of the Apocalypse is a 1962 American-Mexican drama film directed by Vincente Minnelli and starring Glenn Ford, Ingrid Thulin, Charles Boyer, Lee J. Cobb, Paul Lukas, Yvette Mimieux, Karl Boehm and Paul Henreid.

Human Desire

He instead continued to bring in solid performances in thrillers, dramas, and action films such as A Stolen Life with Bette Davis, memorable film noir: The Big Heat directed by Hitler refugee Fritz Lang, co-starring Gloria Grahame, and reteamed with the same in the following year in Human Desire, loosely based on La Bete Humaine, the 1870 Emile Zola novel.
Human Desire is a 1954 black-and-white film noir directed by Fritz Lang, starring Glenn Ford and Gloria Grahame.

The Fastest Gun Alive

In Interrupted Melody, he starred with Eleanor Parker, and the Westerns with which he would always be associated included Jubal, The Fastest Gun Alive, Cowboy, The Secret of Convict Lake with Gene Tierney, and what would become a classic 3:10 to Yuma, and Cimarron.
The Fastest Gun Alive is a 1956 Western film starring Glenn Ford, Jeanne Crain, and Broderick Crawford.

Vic Morrow

Messed-up white kids were there, too, particularly one played by Vic Morrow, depicting that new phenomenon, the juvenile delinquent.
His first movie role was in Blackboard Jungle (1955), playing a thug student who torments teacher Glenn Ford.

3:10 to Yuma (1957 film)

3:10 to Yuma3:10 to Yuma'' (1957 film)1957
In Interrupted Melody, he starred with Eleanor Parker, and the Westerns with which he would always be associated included Jubal, The Fastest Gun Alive, Cowboy, The Secret of Convict Lake with Gene Tierney, and what would become a classic 3:10 to Yuma, and Cimarron.
3:10 to Yuma is a 1957 American Western film starring Glenn Ford and Van Heflin and directed by Delmer Daves.

1939 in film

19391939 film1939 Hollywood
His first major movie part was in the 1939 film, Heaven with a Barbed Wire Fence.
Heaven with a Barbed Wire Fence, starring Glenn Ford

Santa Monica High School

Santa MonicaSanta Monica High School AuditoriumSanta Monica HS
After Ford graduated from Santa Monica High School, he began working in small theatre groups.
Glenn Ford, actor (Gilda, 3:10 to Yuma)

Blackboard Jungle

The Blackboard Jungle
Blackboard Jungle (1955) was a landmark film of teen angst.
Richard Dadier (Glenn Ford) is a new teacher at North Manual Trades High School, an inner-city school of diverse ethnic backgrounds where many of the pupils, led by student Gregory Miller (Sidney Poitier), frequently engage in anti-social behavior.

Cimarron (1960 film)

Cimarron19601960 remake
In Interrupted Melody, he starred with Eleanor Parker, and the Westerns with which he would always be associated included Jubal, The Fastest Gun Alive, Cowboy, The Secret of Convict Lake with Gene Tierney, and what would become a classic 3:10 to Yuma, and Cimarron.
Cimarron is a 1960 Metrocolor western film filmed in CinemaScope, based on the Edna Ferber novel Cimarron, featuring Glenn Ford and Maria Schell.

Superman (1978 film)

SupermanSuperman: The Movie1978 film
In 1978, Ford had a supporting role in Superman, as Clark Kent's adoptive father, Jonathan Kent, a role that introduced Ford to a new generation of film audiences.
An international co-production between the United Kingdom, Switzerland, Panama and the United States, the film stars an ensemble cast featuring Marlon Brando, Gene Hackman, Christopher Reeve, Jeff East, Margot Kidder, Glenn Ford, Phyllis Thaxter, Jackie Cooper, Trevor Howard, Marc McClure, Terence Stamp, Valerie Perrine, Ned Beatty, Jack O'Halloran, Maria Schell, and Sarah Douglas.

Experiment in Terror

Framed, Experiment in Terror with Lee Remick, and Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse were other dramas, often expensive and high-profile projects, if not always profitable, from the studio.
The film stars Glenn Ford, Lee Remick, Stefanie Powers, and Ross Martin.

John Cromwell (director)

John CromwellJohn Cromwell.
Top Hollywood director John Cromwell was impressed enough with his work to borrow him from Columbia for the independently produced drama, So Ends Our Night (1941), where Ford delivered a poignant portrayal of a 19-year-old German exile on the run in Nazi-occupied Europe.
Producers David Loew and Albert Lewin cast Fredric March, Margaret Sullavan and Glenn Ford as three desperate German exiles trapped and on the run after being deprived of their citizenship and passports by the Nazi regime.

The Secret of Convict Lake

In Interrupted Melody, he starred with Eleanor Parker, and the Westerns with which he would always be associated included Jubal, The Fastest Gun Alive, Cowboy, The Secret of Convict Lake with Gene Tierney, and what would become a classic 3:10 to Yuma, and Cimarron.
The Secret of Convict Lake is a 1951 American black-and-white western film starring Glenn Ford and Gene Tierney.