A report on Glossary of plant morphology

An acaulescent species of Streptocarpus has only one leaf, and appears to have no stem
Parts of plant stem
Euonymus alata, an example of alate stems
Saraca cauliflora, an example of cauliflora
Sciadopitys verticillata, an example of a verticillate plant
Leaf morphology:
Shape, margin and venation.
Bracts, Taraxacum officinale
Bracts
Pedicellate attachment
Sessile attachment
Verticillaster, Lamium album
Scheme of a drupe
Scheme of a pome
Mouth of a sporophyte, showing the teeth of the peristome. (It is diplolepidous, with a closed endostome and opened exostome)
Dehisced capsule of a sporophyte, with the operculum remaining attached via the columella

This page provides a glossary of plant morphology.

- Glossary of plant morphology
An acaulescent species of Streptocarpus has only one leaf, and appears to have no stem

4 related topics with Alpha

Overall

This cultivar of Japanese maple has a dome-like habit.

Habit (biology)

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In zoology (particularly in ethology), habit usually refers to aspects of more or less predictable behaviour, instinctive or otherwise, though it also has broader application. Habitus refers to the characteristic form or morphology of a species.

In zoology (particularly in ethology), habit usually refers to aspects of more or less predictable behaviour, instinctive or otherwise, though it also has broader application. Habitus refers to the characteristic form or morphology of a species.

This cultivar of Japanese maple has a dome-like habit.

In botany, habit is the characteristic form in which a given species of plant grows (see plant habit).

In the bud Tetradenia riparia leaves had their upper surfaces turned toward the stem and the . The lower surface is ("away from the axis"), and the upper surface is adaxial.

Glossary of botanical terms

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List of definitions of terms and concepts relevant to botany and plants in general.

List of definitions of terms and concepts relevant to botany and plants in general.

In the bud Tetradenia riparia leaves had their upper surfaces turned toward the stem and the . The lower surface is ("away from the axis"), and the upper surface is adaxial.
Diagram of a coconut fruit. The (endosperm) is labelled Alb.
Caffeine is an with four nitrogen atoms in its carbon skeleton.
leaves of unidentified Gazania
of wild rye, showing prominent s
Anatomy of an and bristles on a species of Australian grass
Baculiform desmid in genus Closterium
Structure of a compound leaf
of a mature elm
Dianthus chinensis has a growth habit.
tissue of Nicotiana tabacum growing on a nutrient medium in plant tissue culture
Dormant leaf buds of deciduous trees are commonly protected by imbricate s that are shed when the bud sprouts.
Curcuma pseudomontana with red coma bracts
Pfaffia gnaphalioides flowers with basal coma hairs
Coma atop Muscari armeniacum, bearing sterile flowers
lichens on a wall
Euphorbia milii is commercially grown for the aesthetic appearance of its brightly colored, -like structures called s, which sit below the.
developing in tissue of carpels where they meet to form locules in the capsule of the ovary of Lilium
(bilateral) leaves of Syzygium gerrardii and Triadica sebifera
Leaves of Epipremnum aureum have a.
The enlarged and smaller of Hibiscus sabdariffa
Shoots from buds on Eucalyptus following a bushfire
Seeds or fruits are dispersed by when they stick to the fur of animals.
The bases of leaves enclose later leaves on the stem.
Letharia vulpina is a lichen.
Aloe brevifolia bears an.
These apothecia of the lichen Lecanora muralis have raised, rippled rims of tissue similar to the tissue of the main thallus body.
1: Meristem
2: Columella
 showing statocytes with statoliths
3: Lateral part of the tip
4: Dead cells
5: Elongation zone
A-Lower epidermis
B-Lower palisade mesophyll
C-Upper epidermis
D-Upper palisade mesophyll
E- Spongy mesophyll
F-Leaf vein
A-
B-
C-
D-
E-
Mycelium of growing on the roots of Picea
Plant stem s and
Asclepias physocarpa shedding seeds, each with its silky
Aloe ferox in flower, bearing two on s
Simply leaf of Ekebergia capensis
Flowers in the of Euphorbia platyphyllos open simultaneously, as a
stem and of Gomphrena celosioides
The lobes of a Taraxacum officinale leaf point downward, i.e. toward the stem.
flowers of Plumbago auriculata
Trametes versicolor, the turkey tail fungus, is a that consumes dead wood in forests. Its common name comes from the conspicuously patterned brackets, but the main body of the saprotroph consists of the largely invisible that penetrates the dead wood and digests it.
under the leaf of the fern Rumohra adiantiformis. Some are still covered by their.
Drosera spatulata leaves are markedly.
The flowering of this Salvia nemorosa differs from a in that the flowers are practically.
leaves of Salsola australis: stiff, narrowed, and with lobes ending in spiny points
Bird nest fungi, Nidulariaceae, bear spectacular examples of s, with spores that are spread by raindrops.
of the fungus Rhizopus
Manilkara hexandra flowers have both with and s that have no anthers.
leaves are narrow with an elongated, tapering tip, as seen on this species of Aloe.
The large, ,,, mottled leaves of the Gasteria and the small, succulent, leaves of a Crassula species contrast with the ,  leaves of a Hypoxis species.
s around the trunk of Dypsis lutescens
(specifically polysulcate) grooves along the stem of Scorzonera cana
ovary in an Aloe species. One flower is sectioned to display the and.
The along the concave curve of the pod of Crotalaria, along which the seeds are attached, is where the single carpel has folded shut.
An undamaged of a Ficus species, plus two more cut open longitudinally to display the fruit within
Leucaena leucocephala exposed in a roadcut
Cross sections of Brazil nut seeds, showing the and
s of Cucurbita pepo, some supporting the stem on the frame, some failing to find a point of attachment
Nerine bowdenii, showing the lack of visible s, and the . The sepals are incorporated into the as s.
raceme of Kniphofia shown together with a cross section of a peduncle. A: Inflorescence; B: Terete ; C: Cross section of a terete peduncle
Gymnosporia buxifolia has true s, that is, modified branches. In some species such branches are complete with buds and leaves.
Sweet potato s exposed, showing them to be root tubers. Morphologically they differ from stem tubers of potatoes, for example, in that root tubers do not have that bear buds. The root tubers of some species of plants, however, can produce buds for vegetative reproduction.
Oxalis tuberosa, a stem tuber
of Crocosmia bear typical s formed of growing from the of the corm. The illustration shows still-living cataphylls as white tissue, whereas the functional, hard, resistant tunic is brown.
(spinning-top shaped) roots of sugar beet
Haworthia lockwoodii, with its leaves and green after seasonal rains, storing water against the coming dry period
grasses on mountain slopes
in the middle of the cap of Cantharellula umbonata
Thorny of Senegalia mellifera subspecies detinens are.
Mammillaria bocasana has tips on its major.
Pitchers of the species Nepenthes ventricosa tend to be markedly.
A: Phloem
B: Cambium
C: Xylem
D: Fibrous sheath of vascular bundle
leaves and emerging branchlets of a
Scanning electron micrograph of the carpopodium at the base of the achene-like fruit of Zyzyura mayana, Asteraceae.
The fruit of Poncirus is a typical hesperidium

Terms of plant morphology are included here as well as at the more specific Glossary of plant morphology and Glossary of leaf morphology.

Typical form of a mallee, Eucalyptus stricta

Mallee (habit)

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Typical form of a mallee, Eucalyptus stricta
Scrub/mallee roller being used in South Australian mallee, c.1922

Mallee are trees or shrubs, mainly certain species of eucalypts, which grow with multiple stems springing from an underground lignotuber, usually to a height of no more than 10 m. The term is widely used for trees with this growth habit across southern Australia, in the states of Western Australia, South Australia, New South Wales and Victoria, and has given rise to other uses of the term, including the ecosystems where such trees predominate, specific geographic areas within some of the states and as part of various species' names.

The diversity of leaves

Leaf

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[[File:Leaf, Bud, and Stem Diagram.svg|thumb|Diagram of a simple leaf. 1. Apex

[[File:Leaf, Bud, and Stem Diagram.svg|thumb|Diagram of a simple leaf. 1. Apex

The diversity of leaves
Leaf of Tilia tomentosa (Silver lime tree)
Top and right: staghorn sumac, Rhus typhina (compound leaf) Bottom: skunk cabbage, Symplocarpus foetidus (simple leaf)
Vein skeleton of a leaf. Veins contain lignin that make them harder to degrade for microorganisms.
Near the ground these Eucalyptus saplings have juvenile dorsiventral foliage from the previous year, but this season their newly sprouting foliage is isobilateral, like the mature foliage on the adult trees above
A leaf shed in autumn.
Rosa canina: Petiole, two stipules, rachis, five leaflets
Citrus leaves with translucent glands
Prostrate leaves in Crossyne guttata
Whorled leaf pattern of the American tiger lily
The leaves on this plant are arranged in pairs opposite one another, with successive pairs at right angles to each other (decussate) along the red stem. Note the developing buds in the axils of these leaves.
The leaves on this plant are alternately arranged (Senecio angulatus).
A leaf with laminar structure and pinnate venation
The overgrown petioles of rhubarb (Rheum rhabarbarum) are edible.
Branching veins on underside of taro leaf
The venation within the bract of a lime tree
Micrograph of a leaf skeleton
Medium scale diagram of leaf internal anatomy
Fine scale diagram of leaf structure
SEM image of the leaf epidermis of Nicotiana alata, showing trichomes (hair-like appendages) and stomata (eye-shaped slits, visible at full resolution).
The veins of a bramble leaf
Some insects, like Kallima inachus, mimic leaves
Leaves shifting color in autumn (fall)
Poinsettia bracts are leaves which have evolved red pigmentation in order to attract insects and birds to the central flowers, an adaptive function normally served by petals (which are themselves leaves highly modified by evolution).
Leaf morphology terms
Leaves showing various morphologies. Clockwise from upper left: tripartite lobation, elliptic with serrulate margin, palmate venation, acuminate odd-pinnate (center), pinnatisect, lobed, elliptic with entire margin
The scale-shaped leaves of the Norfolk Island Pine.
Common mullein (Verbascum thapsus) leaves are covered in dense, stellate trichomes.
Scanning electron microscope image of trichomes on the lower surface of a Coleus blumei (coleus) leaf
Silky aster (Symphyotrichum sericeum) leaves are sericeous.
Venation of a Poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima) leaf.
Flabellate venation, Adiantum cunninghamii
Palmate venation, Acer truncatum
Cross-section of a leaf
Epidermal cells
Spongy mesophyll cells

Where leaves are basal, and lie on the ground, they are referred to as prostrate.