Glucose

dextroseD-glucose D -glucoseGlcglucopyranosecorn sugarsugarglucofuranoseglucose solutionglucosyl residue
Glucose is a simple sugar with the molecular formula.wikipedia
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Sugar

sugarssugar tradesugar cube
Glucose is a simple sugar with the molecular formula.
Simple sugars, also called monosaccharides, include glucose, fructose, and galactose.

Cellulose

cellulolyticcellulosiccellulose ester
There it is used to make cellulose in cell walls, which is the most abundant carbohydrate. Glucose can be obtained by hydrolysis of carbohydrates such as milk sugar (lactose), cane sugar (sucrose), maltose, cellulose, glycogen, etc. It is commonly commercially manufactured from cornstarch by hydrolysis via pressurized steaming at controlled pH in a jet followed by further enzymatic depolymerization. Glucose is a building block of the disaccharides lactose and sucrose (cane or beet sugar), of oligosaccharides such as raffinose and of polysaccharides such as starch and amylopectin, glycogen or cellulose.
Cellulose is an organic compound with the formula, a polysaccharide consisting of a linear chain of several hundred to many thousands of β(1→4) linked D -glucose units.

Starch

starcheswheat starchrice starch
Glucose for metabolism is partially stored as a polymer, in plants mainly as starch and amylopectin and in animals as glycogen. Glucose is a building block of the disaccharides lactose and sucrose (cane or beet sugar), of oligosaccharides such as raffinose and of polysaccharides such as starch and amylopectin, glycogen or cellulose.
It consists of many glucose units linked by glycosidic bonds.

Glycogen

glycogen depositsglycogen (n)glycogen deposits
Glucose for metabolism is partially stored as a polymer, in plants mainly as starch and amylopectin and in animals as glycogen. Glucose can be obtained by hydrolysis of carbohydrates such as milk sugar (lactose), cane sugar (sucrose), maltose, cellulose, glycogen, etc. It is commonly commercially manufactured from cornstarch by hydrolysis via pressurized steaming at controlled pH in a jet followed by further enzymatic depolymerization. Glucose is a building block of the disaccharides lactose and sucrose (cane or beet sugar), of oligosaccharides such as raffinose and of polysaccharides such as starch and amylopectin, glycogen or cellulose.
Glycogen is a multibranched polysaccharide of glucose that serves as a form of energy storage in animals, fungi, and bacteria.

Intravenous sugar solution

Glucose5% dextrose in waterD5W
Glucose, as intravenous sugar solution, is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most important medications needed in a basic health system.
Intravenous sugar solution, also known as dextrose solution, is a mixture of dextrose (glucose) and water.

Chemical formula

molecular formulaformulageneral formula
Glucose is a simple sugar with the molecular formula.
For example, the empirical formula for glucose is CH 2 O (twice as many hydrogen atoms as carbon and oxygen), while its molecular formula is C 6 H 12 O 6 (12 hydrogen atoms, six carbon and oxygen atoms).

Photosynthesis

photosyntheticphotosynthesizephotosynthesizing
Glucose is mainly made by plants and most algae during photosynthesis from water and carbon dioxide, using energy from sunlight.
Using the ATP and NADPH produced by the light-dependent reactions, the resulting compounds are then reduced and removed to form further carbohydrates, such as glucose.

Must

grape mustmustumgrape juice
The name glucose derives through the French from the Greek γλυκός ('glukos'), which means "sweet," in reference to must, the sweet, first press of grapes in the making of wine.
Because of its high glucose content, typically between 10 and 15%, must is also used as a sweetener in a variety of cuisines.

Monosaccharide

monosaccharidessimple sugarsimple sugars
Glucose is the most abundant monosaccharide, a subcategory of carbohydrates.
Examples of monosaccharides include glucose (dextrose), fructose (levulose), and galactose.

Amylopectin

Glucose for metabolism is partially stored as a polymer, in plants mainly as starch and amylopectin and in animals as glycogen. Glucose is a building block of the disaccharides lactose and sucrose (cane or beet sugar), of oligosaccharides such as raffinose and of polysaccharides such as starch and amylopectin, glycogen or cellulose.
Amylopectin is a water-soluble polysaccharide and highly branched polymer of α-glucose units found in plants.

Sucrose

cane sugarsugarcaster sugar
Glucose can be obtained by hydrolysis of carbohydrates such as milk sugar (lactose), cane sugar (sucrose), maltose, cellulose, glycogen, etc. It is commonly commercially manufactured from cornstarch by hydrolysis via pressurized steaming at controlled pH in a jet followed by further enzymatic depolymerization. Glucose is a building block of the disaccharides lactose and sucrose (cane or beet sugar), of oligosaccharides such as raffinose and of polysaccharides such as starch and amylopectin, glycogen or cellulose.
It is a disaccharide, a molecule composed of two monosaccharides: glucose and fructose.

Hydrolysis

hydrolyzedhydrolysehydrolyze
Glucose can be obtained by hydrolysis of carbohydrates such as milk sugar (lactose), cane sugar (sucrose), maltose, cellulose, glycogen, etc. It is commonly commercially manufactured from cornstarch by hydrolysis via pressurized steaming at controlled pH in a jet followed by further enzymatic depolymerization.
When a carbohydrate is broken into its component sugar molecules by hydrolysis (e.g. sucrose being broken down into glucose and fructose), this is recognized as saccharification.

Lactose

milk sugarmilk sugarssugars
Glucose can be obtained by hydrolysis of carbohydrates such as milk sugar (lactose), cane sugar (sucrose), maltose, cellulose, glycogen, etc. It is commonly commercially manufactured from cornstarch by hydrolysis via pressurized steaming at controlled pH in a jet followed by further enzymatic depolymerization. Glucose is a building block of the disaccharides lactose and sucrose (cane or beet sugar), of oligosaccharides such as raffinose and of polysaccharides such as starch and amylopectin, glycogen or cellulose.
It is a sugar composed of galactose and glucose subunits and has the molecular formula C 12 H 22 O 11.

Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Nobel PrizeNobel Prize in MedicineMedicine
For the discovery of the metabolism of glucose Otto Meyerhof received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1922.
The first woman to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, Gerty Cori, received it in 1947 for her role in elucidating the metabolism of glucose, important in many aspects of medicine, including treatment of diabetes.

Honey

bee honeyforest honeyheather honey
Unbonded glucose is one of the main ingredients of honey.
Honey gets its sweetness from the monosaccharides fructose and glucose, and has about the same relative sweetness as sucrose (table sugar).

Maltose

malt sugarC11 Maltose
Glucose can be obtained by hydrolysis of carbohydrates such as milk sugar (lactose), cane sugar (sucrose), maltose, cellulose, glycogen, etc. It is commonly commercially manufactured from cornstarch by hydrolysis via pressurized steaming at controlled pH in a jet followed by further enzymatic depolymerization.
Maltose ( or ), also known as maltobiose or malt sugar, is a disaccharide formed from two units of glucose joined with an α(1→4) bond.

Bernardo Houssay

Bernardo A. HoussayBernardo Alberto HoussayBernardo '''Houssay
In 1947, Bernardo Houssay (for his discovery of the role of the pituitary gland in the metabolism of glucose and the derived carbohydrates) as well as Carl and Gerty Cori (for their discovery of the conversion of glycogen from glucose) received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
Bernardo Alberto Houssay (April 10, 1887 – September 21, 1971) was an Argentine physiologist who, in 1947, was a co-recipient of a Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of the role played by pituitary hormones in regulating the amount of blood sugar (glucose) in animals.

Raffinose

D-raffinoseF11 Raffinose
Glucose is a building block of the disaccharides lactose and sucrose (cane or beet sugar), of oligosaccharides such as raffinose and of polysaccharides such as starch and amylopectin, glycogen or cellulose.
Raffinose is a trisaccharide composed of galactose, glucose, and fructose.

Gerty Cori

Gerty Theresa CoriGerti CoriGerty T. Cori
In 1947, Bernardo Houssay (for his discovery of the role of the pituitary gland in the metabolism of glucose and the derived carbohydrates) as well as Carl and Gerty Cori (for their discovery of the conversion of glycogen from glucose) received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
With her husband Carl and Argentine physiologist Bernardo Houssay, Gerty Cori received the Nobel Prize in 1947 for the discovery of the mechanism by which glycogen—a derivative of glucose—is broken down in muscle tissue into lactic acid and then resynthesized in the body and stored as a source of energy (known as the Cori cycle).

Carl Ferdinand Cori

Carl CoriCarlCarl F. Cori
In 1947, Bernardo Houssay (for his discovery of the role of the pituitary gland in the metabolism of glucose and the derived carbohydrates) as well as Carl and Gerty Cori (for their discovery of the conversion of glycogen from glucose) received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.
Carl Ferdinand Cori, ForMemRS (December 5, 1896 – October 20, 1984) was a Czech-American biochemist and pharmacologist born in Prague (then in Austria-Hungary, now Czech Republic) who, together with his wife Gerty Cori and Argentine physiologist Bernardo Houssay, received a Nobel Prize in 1947 for their discovery of how glycogen (animal starch) – a derivative of glucose – is broken down and resynthesized in the body, for use as a store and source of energy.

Galactose

galactose metabolismD-galactoseGal
- and -glucose are two of the 16 possible aldohexoses; the other 14 are allose, altrose, galactose, gulose, idose, mannose, and talose, each with two enantiomers, “-” and “-”.
Galactose (, galacto- + -ose, "milk sugar") sometimes abbreviated Gal, is a monosaccharide sugar that is about as sweet as glucose, and about 65% as sweet as sucrose.

Aldohexose

-Glucose is one of the sixteen aldohexose stereoisomers.
Of these, only three commonly occur in nature: D -glucose, D -galactose, and D -mannose.

Carbohydrate

carbohydratessaccharidecomplex carbohydrates
Glucose is the most abundant monosaccharide, a subcategory of carbohydrates.
While the scientific nomenclature of carbohydrates is complex, the names of the monosaccharides and disaccharides very often end in the suffix -ose, as in the monosaccharides fructose (fruit sugar) and glucose (starch sugar) and the disaccharides sucrose (cane or beet sugar) and lactose (milk sugar).

Organic chemistry

organicorganic chemistorganic chemical
Since glucose is a basic necessity of many organisms, a correct understanding of its chemical makeup and structure contributed greatly to a general advancement in organic chemistry.
Total synthesis of complex natural compounds increased in complexity to glucose and terpineol.

Fructose

D-fructosefructose metabolism, inborn errors L -fructose
In dilute sodium hydroxide or other dilute bases, the monosaccharides mannose, glucose and fructose interconvert (via a Lobry de Bruyn–Alberda–van Ekenstein transformation), so that a balance between these isomers is formed.
Fructose, or fruit sugar, is a simple ketonic monosaccharide found in many plants, where it is often bonded to glucose to form the disaccharide sucrose.