Gluteus maximus

gluteus maximus muscleglutesgluteGlutæus maximusAbuttbuttocksglutealglutealsglutei maximi
The gluteus maximus (also known collectively with the gluteus medius and minimus, as the gluteal muscles, and sometimes referred to informally as the "glutes") is the main extensor muscle of the hip.wikipedia
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Gluteal muscles

glutealgluteal musclegluteus
The gluteus maximus (also known collectively with the gluteus medius and minimus, as the gluteal muscles, and sometimes referred to informally as the "glutes") is the main extensor muscle of the hip.
The gluteal muscles are a group of three muscles which make up the buttocks: the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and gluteus minimus.

Buttocks

buttockassarse
Its thick fleshy mass, in a quadrilateral shape, forms the prominence of the buttocks.
The buttocks (singular: buttock) are two rounded portions of the anatomy, located on the posterior of the pelvic region of primates (including humans), and many other bipeds or quadrupeds, and comprise a layer of fat superimposed on the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius muscles.

Gluteus medius

gluteus medius musclemediusGlutæus medius
The gluteus maximus (also known collectively with the gluteus medius and minimus, as the gluteal muscles, and sometimes referred to informally as the "glutes") is the main extensor muscle of the hip.
Its posterior third is covered by the gluteus maximus, its anterior two-thirds by the gluteal aponeurosis, which separates it from the superficial fascia and integument.

Coccyx

tailbonecoccygealtail bone
The borders of the coccyx are narrow, and give attachment on either side to the sacrotuberous and sacrospinous ligaments, to the coccygeus and levator ani in front of the ligaments, and to the gluteus maximus behind them.

Erector spinae muscles

erector spinaesacrospinalisback muscles
Some of its fibers are continuous with the fibers of origin of the gluteus maximus.

Fascia lata

deep fascia
The gluteus maximus is a tensor of the fascia lata, and by its connection with the iliotibial band steadies the femur on the articular surfaces of the tibia during standing, when the extensor muscles are relaxed.
It is thicker in the upper and lateral part of the thigh, where it receives a fibrous expansion from the gluteus maximus, and where the tensor fasciae latae is inserted between its layers; it is very thin behind and at the upper and medial part, where it covers the adductor muscles, and again becomes stronger around the knee, receiving fibrous expansions from the tendon of the biceps femoris laterally, from the sartorius medially, and from the quadriceps femoris in front.

Greater trochanter

greatertrochantergreat trochanter
Below and behind the diagonal impression is a smooth triangular surface, over which the tendon of the gluteus maximus lies, a bursa being interposed.

Adductor magnus muscle

adductor magnusadductoradductor muscle
Its most powerful action is to cause the body to regain the erect position after stooping, by drawing the pelvis backward, being assisted in this action by the biceps femoris (long head), semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and adductor magnus.
Those fibers which arise from the ramus of the pubis are short, horizontal in direction, and are inserted into the rough line of the femur leading from the greater trochanter to the linea aspera, medial to the gluteus maximus.

Sacrum

sacralsacral vertebraesacral vertebra
The thin lower half of the lateral surface gives attachment to the sacrotuberous and sacrospinous ligaments, to some fibers of the gluteus maximus at the back and to the coccygeus in the front.

Squat (exercise)

squatsquatsback squat
The primary agonist muscles used during the squat are the quadriceps femoris, the adductor magnus, and the gluteus maximus.

Vastus lateralis muscle

vastus lateralisexternuslateralis
Some additional fibers arise from the tendon of the gluteus maximus muscle, and from the septum between the vastus lateralis and short head of the biceps femoris.

Biceps femoris muscle

biceps femorisBicep femorisbiceps
Its most powerful action is to cause the body to regain the erect position after stooping, by drawing the pelvis backward, being assisted in this action by the biceps femoris (long head), semitendinosus, semimembranosus, and adductor magnus.

Gluteal aponeurosis

The gluteal aponeurosis is a fibrous membrane, from the fascia lata, that lies between the iliac crest and the superior border of the gluteus maximus.

Inferior gluteal nerve

Inferior gluteal
The inferior gluteal nerve is the main motor neuron that innervates the gluteus maximus muscle.

Gluteal tuberosity

The gluteal tuberosity gives attachment to part of the Gluteus maximus: its upper part is often elongated into a roughened crest, on which a more or less well-marked, rounded tubercle, the third trochanter, is occasionally developed.

Iliotibial tract

iliotibial bandIT-band
The gluteus maximus is a tensor of the fascia lata, and by its connection with the iliotibial band steadies the femur on the articular surfaces of the tibia during standing, when the extensor muscles are relaxed.
The gluteus maximus muscle and the tensor fasciae latae insert upon the tract.

Pelvis

pelvicpelvic girdlehip
Taking its fixed point from below, it acts upon the pelvis, supporting it and the trunk upon the head of the femur; this is particularly obvious in standing on one leg.
The posterior group includes the gluteus maximus, gluteus medius, and gluteus minimus.

Lumbar fascia

Additionally the lumbar fascia is an attachment for the gluteus maximus muscle and the latissimus dorsi muscle.

Superior gluteal artery

superior glutealSuperiorartery
The superficial branch enters the deep surface of the gluteus maximus, and divides into numerous branches, some of which supply the muscle and anastomose with the inferior gluteal artery, while others perforate its tendinous origin, and supply the integument covering the posterior surface of the sacrum, anastomosing with the posterior branches of the lateral sacral arteries.

Ischium

ischiainferior ramus of the ischiumischial
Ischial bursitis (also known as weaver's bottom) is inflammation of the synovial bursa located between the gluteus maximus muscle and the ischial tuberosity, and is usually caused by prolonged sitting on a hard surface.

Inferior gluteal artery

inferior gluteal arteriesInferior glutealartery
It then descends in the interval between the greater trochanter of the femur and tuberosity of the ischium, accompanied by the sciatic and posterior femoral cutaneous nerves, and covered by the gluteus maximus, and is continued down the back of the thigh, supplying the skin, and anastomosing with branches of the perforating arteries.