Glyceride

glyceridesacetoglyceridesacylglyceridesacylglycerolglyceridsmonoglyceridemonoglyceride and diglyceridetriglyceride
Glycerides, more correctly known as acylglycerols, are esters formed from glycerol and fatty acids.wikipedia
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Ester

estersesterificationmonoester
Glycerides, more correctly known as acylglycerols, are esters formed from glycerol and fatty acids.
Glycerides, which are fatty acid esters of glycerol, are important esters in biology, being one of the main classes of lipids, and making up the bulk of animal fats and vegetable oils.

Glycerol

glyceringlycerineE422
Glycerides, more correctly known as acylglycerols, are esters formed from glycerol and fatty acids. An acylglyceride linkage is the covalent bond between the organic acid groups (such as fatty acid) and one of the three hydroxyl groups of glycerol.
The glycerol backbone is found in those lipids known as glycerides.

Monoglyceride

monoacylglycerolmonoglyceridesmono-
Glycerol has three hydroxyl functional groups, which can be esterified with one, two, or three fatty acids to form monoglycerides, diglycerides, and triglycerides.
Monoglycerides (also: acylglycerols or monoacylglycerols) are a class of glycerides which are composed of a molecule of glycerol linked to a fatty acid via an ester bond.

Diglyceride

diacylglycerolDAGdiacyl glycerol
Glycerol has three hydroxyl functional groups, which can be esterified with one, two, or three fatty acids to form monoglycerides, diglycerides, and triglycerides.
A diglyceride, or diacylglycerol (DAG), is a glyceride consisting of two fatty acid chains covalently bonded to a glycerol molecule through ester linkages.

Triglyceride

triglyceridestriacylglyceroltriacylglycerols
Glycerol has three hydroxyl functional groups, which can be esterified with one, two, or three fatty acids to form monoglycerides, diglycerides, and triglycerides. The most common forms of acylglycerol are triglycerides, having high caloric value and usually yielding twice as much energy per gram as carbohydrate.
A triglyceride (TG, triacylglycerol, TAG, or triacylglyceride) is an ester derived from glycerol and three fatty acids (from tri- and glyceride).

Fatty acid

fatty acidsfree fatty acidsfree fatty acid
Glycerides, more correctly known as acylglycerols, are esters formed from glycerol and fatty acids. An acylglyceride linkage is the covalent bond between the organic acid groups (such as fatty acid) and one of the three hydroxyl groups of glycerol.

Functional group

groupfunctional groupsmoiety
Glycerol has three hydroxyl functional groups, which can be esterified with one, two, or three fatty acids to form monoglycerides, diglycerides, and triglycerides.

Vegetable oil

oilseedoilseedsoil
Vegetable oils and animal fats contain mostly triglycerides, but are broken down by natural enzymes (lipases) into mono and diglycerides and free fatty acids and glycerol.

Animal fat

animal fatsanimalfat
Vegetable oils and animal fats contain mostly triglycerides, but are broken down by natural enzymes (lipases) into mono and diglycerides and free fatty acids and glycerol.

Enzyme

enzymologyenzymesenzymatic
Vegetable oils and animal fats contain mostly triglycerides, but are broken down by natural enzymes (lipases) into mono and diglycerides and free fatty acids and glycerol.

Lipase

lipaseslipase LIPFE1104
Vegetable oils and animal fats contain mostly triglycerides, but are broken down by natural enzymes (lipases) into mono and diglycerides and free fatty acids and glycerol.

Soap

soapssoapmakingsoap making
Soaps are formed from the reaction of glycerides with sodium hydroxide.

Sodium hydroxide

caustic sodaNaOHsodium
Soaps are formed from the reaction of glycerides with sodium hydroxide.

Emulsion

emulsifieremulsifiersemulsions
Fatty acids in the soap emulsify the oils in dirt, enabling the removal of oily dirt with water.

Excipient

excipientsinactive ingredientsbinder
Short chain partial glycerides are more strongly polar than long chain partial glycerides, and have excellent solvent properties for many hard-to-solubilize drugs, making them valuable as excipients in improving the formulation of certain pharmaceuticals.

Calorie

calorieskcalkilocalorie
The most common forms of acylglycerol are triglycerides, having high caloric value and usually yielding twice as much energy per gram as carbohydrate.

Covalent bond

covalentcovalentlycovalently bonded
An acylglyceride linkage is the covalent bond between the organic acid groups (such as fatty acid) and one of the three hydroxyl groups of glycerol.

Organic acid

organic acidsorganicacid
An acylglyceride linkage is the covalent bond between the organic acid groups (such as fatty acid) and one of the three hydroxyl groups of glycerol.

Hydroxy group

hydroxylhydroxyl grouphydroxy
Glycerol has three hydroxyl functional groups, which can be esterified with one, two, or three fatty acids to form monoglycerides, diglycerides, and triglycerides. An acylglyceride linkage is the covalent bond between the organic acid groups (such as fatty acid) and one of the three hydroxyl groups of glycerol.

Permanent marker

permanent markersArtlineArtline (marker)
In general, the ink comprises a main carrier solvent, a glyceride, a pyrrolidone, a resin and a colorant, making it water resistant.

Lanolin

EuceritE913grease
Historically, many pharmacopoeias have referred to lanolin as wool fat (adeps lanae); however, as lanolin lacks glycerides (glycerol esters), it is not a true fat.

Sucrose esters

E473
Sucrose esters or sucrose fatty acid esters are a group of surfactants chemically synthesized from esterification of sucrose and fatty acids (or glycerides).

Butyric acid

butanoate metabolismbutyricbutanoic acid
The triglyceride of butyric acid makes up 3–4% of butter.

Lilium auratum

Golden-rayed lilyMountain LilyYamayuri
L. auratum contains phenolic glycerides such as 1,2-O-diferuloylglycerol, 1-O-feruloyl-2-O-p-coumaroylglycerol, 1-O-p-coumaroyl-2-O-feruloylglycerol, 1-O-feruloylglycerol, 1,3-O-diferuloylglycerol, 1-O-feruloyl-3-O-p-coumaroylglycerol and 1-O-p-coumaroylglycerol.

Lingual lipase

lingual
Lingual lipase is a member of a family of digestive enzymes called triacylglycerol lipases, EC 3.1.1.3, that use the catalytic triad of aspartate, histidine, and serine to hydrolyze medium and long-chain triglycerides into partial glycerides and free fatty acids.