Goa Inquisition

Goan InquisitionInquisitionGoaPersecution of Goan Catholics during the Goan InquisitionPortuguese Inquisition(see Goa Inquisition)Christian conversionsGoa Inquisition of 1560Inquisition of GoaPortuguese rule of Goa
The Goa Inquisition was a colonial-era Portuguese institution established by the Roman Catholic Holy Office between the 16th- and 19th-century to stop and punish heresy against Christianity in Asia.wikipedia
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Goa

Goa, IndiaState of GoaGoa (India)
The Goa Inquisition was a colonial-era Portuguese institution established by the Roman Catholic Holy Office between the 16th- and 19th-century to stop and punish heresy against Christianity in Asia.
The Goa Inquisition, a formal tribunal, was established in 1560, and was finally abolished in 1812.

Francis Xavier

St. Francis XavierSaint Francis XavierSt Francis Xavier
The setting up of the Goa Inquisition was requested by Jesuit missionary Francis Xavier from his headquarters Malacca in a letter dated 16 May 1546 to King John III of Portugal. In particular, the first archbishop of Goa Dom Gaspar de Leao Pereira and later Francis Xavier were extremely critical of the New Christians presence, and were highly influential in petitioning for the establishment of the Inquisition in Goa.
The Goa Inquisition was proposed by St. Francis Xavier.

Konkani language

KonkaniGoan KonkaniMangalorean Konkani
The Catholic Christian missionaries also burnt any books written in Sanskrit, Arabic, Marathi, or Konkani that they could find in Goa, as well as restricted Protestant Christian books from entering Goa on Dutch or English merchant ships.
During the Goa Inquisition which commenced in 1560, all books found in the Konkani language were burnt, and it is possible that old Konkani literature was destroyed as a consequence.

Garcia de Orta

Garcia da OrtaGarcias ab Orto
One of the most notable New Christians was professor Garcia de Orta, who emigrated to Goa in 1534.
Garcia de Orta died before the Inquisition began in Goa but in 1569 his sister was burnt at the stake for being a secret Jew and based on her confession his remains were later exhumed and burnt along with an effigy.

John III of Portugal

John IIIJoão IIIKing John III
The setting up of the Goa Inquisition was requested by Jesuit missionary Francis Xavier from his headquarters Malacca in a letter dated 16 May 1546 to King John III of Portugal.
The Goa Inquisition changed the demographics of Goa considerably.

Kochi

Cochincity of KochiKochi, India
The Portuguese were regularly deploying their military power and engaging in war both in Goa and Cochin (Kochi).
This Portuguese period was a harrowing time for the Saint Thomas Christians and the Jews, as the Inquisition was active in Portuguese India.

Society of Jesus

JesuitJesuitsS.J.
Xavier had co-founded the Society of Jesus, the main source of missionaries who implemented the Inquisition.
In a 1545 letter to John III of Portugal, he requested an Inquisition to be installed in Goa (see Goa Inquisition).

Sephardi Jews

SephardicSephardiSephardic Jews
Sephardic Jews living in Goa, many of whom had fled the Iberian Peninsula to escape the excesses of the Spanish Inquisition, were also persecuted in case they, or their ancestors, had fraudulently converted to Christianity.
Their presence aroused the anger of Gaspar Jorge de Leão Pereira, the first archbishop of Goa, who called for the initiation of the Goa Inquisition against the Sephardic Jews in India.

Anti-Hindu sentiment

anti-HinduAnti-HinduismHinduphobia
The Portuguese colonial administration under demands of the Jesuits and Church Provincial Council of Goa in 1567 enacted anti-Hindu laws to end what the Catholics considered to be heretical conduct and to encourage conversions to Christianity.
The Goa Inquisition was a colonial era Portuguese institution established by the Roman Catholic Holy Office between the 16th- and 19th-century to stop and punish heresy against Christianity in South Asia.

Portuguese Inquisition

InquisitionPortugueseinquisition in Portugal
The establishment of the Portuguese on the Western coast of India was of particular interest to the New Christians population of Portugal who were suffering harshly under the Portuguese Inquisition.
The Portuguese Inquisition expanded its scope of operations from Portugal to Portugal's colonial possessions, including Brazil, Cape Verde, and Goa, where it continued investigating and trying cases based on supposed breaches of orthodox Roman Catholicism until 1821.

Gaspar Jorge de Leão Pereira

Gaspar de Leão PereiraDom GasparDom Gaspar de Leao Pereira
In particular, the first archbishop of Goa Dom Gaspar de Leao Pereira and later Francis Xavier were extremely critical of the New Christians presence, and were highly influential in petitioning for the establishment of the Inquisition in Goa.
However, this same author notes the existence of prior censorship of books that were printed: "We have seen that most of the books that we have made mention, were printed prior to censorship and licenses, including those of Archbishop Gaspar! ... What do these criticisms show up and licenses for books written by people of recognized letters and piety? If anything proves the power of the terrible Inquisition, the power that knew no bounds, and that extended up to shackle the mind and oppose the free expression of thought."

Auto-da-fé

auto de feautos-da-féauto da fé
Seventy-one autos de fé were recorded, the grand spectacle of public penance often followed by burning a convicted individual at the stake.
They were also held in the Portuguese colony of Goa following the establishment of the Inquisition there in 1562–1563.

Hindu temple

MandirHindu templestemple
Between 1566 and 1567, a campaign by Franciscan missionaries destroyed another 300 Hindu temples in Bardez (North Goa).
The 16th- and 19th-century Goa Inquisition destroyed hundreds of Hindu temples.

History of Goa

Goaduring colonizationGoa in 1946
The Goa Inquisition, established in 1560, persecuted Hindus, Muslims, and other religious minorities.

Christianity in India

Indian ChristiansChristianityChristian
Most of Mangalorean Catholics were not originally from Mangalore but are descendants of Goan Catholics who fled Goa during the Portuguese-Maratha Wars and the Goan Inquisition.

Aleixo de Menezes

Aleixo de MenesesMenezesAlexis de Menezes
In 1599 under Aleixo de Menezes, the Synod of Diamper forcefully converted the East Syriac Saint Thomas Christians (also known as Syrian Christians or Nasranis) of Kerala to the Roman Catholic Church.
Aleixo de Menezes, under the authority of the Goa Inquisition and the Council of Trent, continued the latinisation of the St. Thomas Christians started by the Portuguese in the early 16th century.

Christianization of Goa

Christianisation of GoaproselytisationChristianisation of Salcete
At least three Sudir priests trained by the Jesuits are known to have been condemned by the Inquisition in 1736.

Synod of Diamper

Council of DiamperDiamperUdhayamperur synd
In 1599 under Aleixo de Menezes, the Synod of Diamper forcefully converted the East Syriac Saint Thomas Christians (also known as Syrian Christians or Nasranis) of Kerala to the Roman Catholic Church.

Coonan Cross Oath

Coonen Cross OathCoonan Cross Leaning Cross Oath (Koonan Kurish Sathyam)
The persecution continued largely until the Coonan Cross oath and Nasrani rebellion in 1653, the eventual capture of Fort Kochi by the Dutch in 1663, and the resultant expulsion of Portuguese from Malabar.

Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith

Holy OfficeCongregation of the Doctrine of the FaithSacred Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith
The Goa Inquisition was a colonial-era Portuguese institution established by the Roman Catholic Holy Office between the 16th- and 19th-century to stop and punish heresy against Christianity in Asia.

Asia

AsianAsian continentAsian countries
The Goa Inquisition was a colonial-era Portuguese institution established by the Roman Catholic Holy Office between the 16th- and 19th-century to stop and punish heresy against Christianity in Asia.

Hindus

HinduShrimantHindoos
The institution persecuted Hindus, Muslims, Bene Israels, New Christians and the Judaizing Nasranis by the colonial era Portuguese government and Jesuit clergy in Portuguese India.

Muslims

MuslimMoslemMoslems
The institution persecuted Hindus, Muslims, Bene Israels, New Christians and the Judaizing Nasranis by the colonial era Portuguese government and Jesuit clergy in Portuguese India.

Bene Israel

Bene Israel JewBene Israeli JewsBene Jews
The institution persecuted Hindus, Muslims, Bene Israels, New Christians and the Judaizing Nasranis by the colonial era Portuguese government and Jesuit clergy in Portuguese India.