Goat

goatsdomestic goatmilkgoat milkgoat's milkCapra hircuskiddairy goatbilly goatCapra aegagrus hircus
The domestic goat or simply goat (Capra aegagrus hircus) is a subspecies of C.wikipedia
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Goat meat

goatmeatchevon
Goats are one of the oldest domesticated species of animal, and have been used for milk, meat, fur and skins across much of the world.
Goat meat or goat's meat is the meat of the domestic goat (Capra aegagrus hircus).

Domestication

domesticateddomesticdomesticate
The domestic goat or simply goat (Capra aegagrus hircus) is a subspecies of C. aegagrus domesticated from the wild goat of Southwest Asia and Eastern Europe.
The archaeological and genetic data suggest that long-term bidirectional gene flow between wild and domestic stocks – including donkeys, horses, New and Old World camelids, goats, sheep, and pigs – was common.

Bovidae

bovidbovids bovid family
The goat is a member of the animal family Bovidae and the subfamily Caprinae, meaning it is closely related to the sheep.
The Bovidae are the biological family of cloven-hoofed, ruminant mammals that includes bison, African buffalo, water buffalo, antelopes, wildebeest, impala, gazelles, sheep, goats, muskoxen, and domestic cattle.

Caprinae

goat-antelopecaprinegoat antelope
The goat is a member of the animal family Bovidae and the subfamily Caprinae, meaning it is closely related to the sheep.
Within this subfamily Caprinae, a prominent tribe, Caprini, includes sheep and goats.

Sheep

ramlambdomestic sheep
The goat is a member of the animal family Bovidae and the subfamily Caprinae, meaning it is closely related to the sheep.
Sheep and goats are closely related: both are in the subfamily Caprinae.

Wild goat

Capra aegagruswild goatsGoat
The domestic goat or simply goat (Capra aegagrus hircus) is a subspecies of C. aegagrus domesticated from the wild goat of Southwest Asia and Eastern Europe.
It is one the ancestors of the domestic goat (''C.

Parchment

parchmentspergamentanimal skins
It has also been used to produce parchment.
Today the term "parchment" is often used in non-technical contexts to refer to any animal skin, particularly goat, sheep or cow, that has been scraped or dried under tension.

Neolithic

Neolithic periodNeolithic AgeNew Stone Age
Neolithic farmers began to herd wild goats primarily for easy access to milk and meat, as well as to their dung, which was used as fuel, and their bones, hair and sinew for clothing, building and tools.
Early Neolithic farming was limited to a narrow range of plants, both wild and domesticated, which included einkorn wheat, millet and spelt, and the keeping of dogs, sheep and goats.

Boer goat

Boer goatsBoer
An exception to this is the Boer goat, which sometimes may have up to eight teats. Both male and female goats have beards, and many types of goat (most commonly dairy goats, dairy-cross Boers, and pygmy goats) may have wattles, one dangling from each side of the neck.
The Boer goat is a breed of goat that was developed in South Africa in the early 1900s and is a popular breed for meat production.

Horn (anatomy)

hornhornshorned
Most goats naturally have two horns, of various shapes and sizes depending on the breed.
In mammals, true horns are found mainly among the ruminant artiodactyls, in the families Antilocapridae (pronghorn) and Bovidae (cattle, goats, antelope etc.).

Pygmy goat

African pygmy goatpygmy goatsAfrican pygmy goats
Both male and female goats have beards, and many types of goat (most commonly dairy goats, dairy-cross Boers, and pygmy goats) may have wattles, one dangling from each side of the neck.
The pygmy goat, also known as the miniature goat, and African pygmy goat, is a breed of miniature domestic goat.

Pupil

pupilspupillaryeye pupil
Goats have horizontal, slit-shaped pupils.
In humans, the pupil is round, but other species, such as some cats, have vertical slit pupils, goats have horizontally oriented pupils, and some catfish have annular types.

Polled livestock

polledhornlessdomesticated forms
Unlike cattle, goats have not been successfully bred to be reliably polled, as the genes determining sex and those determining horns are closely linked.
Natural polling occurs in cattle, yaks, water buffalo, and goats, and in these animals it affects both sexes equally; in sheep, by contrast, both sexes may be horned, both polled, or only the females polled.

Milk

cow's milkcow milkwhole milk
Neolithic farmers began to herd wild goats primarily for easy access to milk and meat, as well as to their dung, which was used as fuel, and their bones, hair and sinew for clothing, building and tools.
These animals include water buffalo, goat, sheep, camel, donkey, horse, reindeer and yak.

Rut (mammalian reproduction)

rutruttingrutting season
Bucks (intact males) of Swiss and northern breeds come into rut in the fall as with the does' heat cycles.
The rut (from the Latin rugire, meaning "to roar") is the mating season of certain mammals, which includes ruminants such as deer, sheep, camels, goats, pronghorns, bison, giraffes and antelopes, and extends to others such as skunks and elephants.

Iran

PersiaIslamic Republic of IranIranian
The earliest remnants of domesticated goats dating 10,000 years before present are found in Ganj Dareh in Iran.
Other domestic animals of Iran include Asian water buffaloes, camels, cattle, donkeys, goats, horses, and the sheep.

Hay

haystackhaymakinghay bale
Alfalfa, a high-protein plant, is widely fed as hay; fescue is the least palatable and least nutritious hay.
Hay is grass, legumes, or other herbaceous plants that have been cut and dried to be stored for use as animal fodder, particularly for large grazing animals raised as livestock, such as cattle, horses, goats, and sheep.

Udder

uddersmammary
The females have an udder consisting of two teats, in contrast to cattle, which have four teats.
An udder is an organ formed of the mammary glands of female ruminants such as cattle, goats, sheep, deer and giraffes.

Livestock

farm animalsfarm animalstock
As with all livestock, increased protein diets (10 to 14%) and sufficient calories during the prepuberty period yield higher growth rates and larger eventual size than lower protein rates and limited calories.
The term is sometimes used to refer solely to those that are bred for consumption, while other times it refers only to farmed ruminants, such as cattle and goats.

Ruminant

ruminantschew their cudruminate
Goats are ruminants.
Ruminating mammals include cattle, all domesticated and wild bovines, goats, sheep, giraffes, deer, gazelles, and antelopes.

Q fever

Q-feverCoxiella burnetiiQuery fever
They can transmit a number of zoonotic diseases to people, such as tuberculosis, brucellosis, Q-fever, and rabies.
This organism is uncommon, but may be found in cattle, sheep, goats, and other domestic mammals, including cats and dogs.

Foot-and-mouth disease

foot and mouth diseasefoot and mouthfoot-and-mouth
Goats can become infected with various viral and bacterial diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease, caprine arthritis encephalitis, caseous lymphadenitis, pinkeye, mastitis, and pseudorabies.
Susceptible animals include cattle, water buffalo, sheep, goats, pigs, antelope, deer, and bison.

Pack goat

goatpacking
In addition, goats are used for driving and packing purposes.
A pack goat is a goat used as a beast of burden, for packing cargo.

Browsing (herbivory)

browsingbrowsersbrowse
While goats will not actually eat inedible material, they are browsing animals, not grazers like cattle and sheep, and (coupled with their highly curious nature) will chew on and taste just about anything remotely resembling plant matter to decide whether it is good to eat, including cardboard, clothing and paper (such as labels from tin cans).
In either case, an example of this dichotomy are goats (which are browsers) and sheep (which are grazers); these two closely related ruminants utilize dissimilar food sources.

Catgut

gutgut stringgut strings
The intestine of goats is used to make "catgut", which is still in use as a material for internal human surgical sutures and strings for musical instruments.
Catgut makers usually use sheep or goat intestines, but occasionally use the intestines of cattle, hogs, horses, mules, or donkeys.