God in Islam

GodAllahSubhanahu wa ta'alaAllāhattributes of GodGod of IslamIslamic Concept of God one GodA'uzu billahi minashaitanir rajimAllah ''(Jalla Jalaalahoo)
In Islam, God (الله, contraction of الْإِلٰه al-ilāh, lit. "the God") is the absolute one, the all-powerful and all-knowing ruler of the universe, and the creator of everything in existence.wikipedia
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Islam

IslamicMuslimMuslims
In Islam, God (الله, contraction of الْإِلٰه al-ilāh, lit. "the God") is the absolute one, the all-powerful and all-knowing ruler of the universe, and the creator of everything in existence.
Islam teaches that God is merciful, all-powerful, and unique, and has guided mankind through prophets, revealed scriptures and natural signs.

Tawhid

monotheismOneness of GodTawheed
Islam emphasizes that God is strictly singular ([[tawhid|]]); unique ; inherently One ; and also all-merciful and omnipotent.
Tawhid (توحيد, meaning "unification or oneness of God"; also romanized as Tawheed, Touheed,Tauheed or Tevhid ) is the indivisible oneness concept of monotheism in islam.

Quran

Qur'anKoranQur’an
According to Islamic teachings, beyond the Throne and according to the Quran, "No vision can grasp him, but His grasp is over all vision: He is above all comprehension, yet is acquainted with all things." The Quran in particular is believed by Muslims to be the verbatim word of God as revealed to Muhammad.
The Quran (القرآن, literally meaning "the recitation"), also romanized Qur'an or Koran, is the central religious text of Islam, which Muslims believe to be a revelation from God (Allah).

God

Supreme BeingLordnature of God
In Islam, God (الله, contraction of الْإِلٰه al-ilāh, lit. "the God") is the absolute one, the all-powerful and all-knowing ruler of the universe, and the creator of everything in existence.
The Abrahamic conceptions of God include the monotheistic definition of God in Judaism, the trinitarian view of Christians, and the Islamic concept of God.

Hadith

HadithsahadithḤadīth
God is described and referred to in the Quran and hadith by 99 names that reflect his attributes. Hadith are the records of Muhammad's sayings and example, and Hadith Qudsi is a sub-category of hadith, which Muslims regard as the words of God repeated by Muhammad.
Hadith have been called "the backbone" of Islamic civilization, and within that religion the authority of hadith as a source for religious law and moral guidance ranks second only to that of the Quran (which Muslims hold to be the word of God revealed to his messenger Muhammad).

Monotheism

monotheisticmonotheistmonotheists
In Islam, God (الله, contraction of الْإِلٰه al-ilāh, lit. "the God") is the absolute one, the all-powerful and all-knowing ruler of the universe, and the creator of everything in existence.
In Islam, God (Allāh) is all-powerful and all-knowing, the creator, sustainer, ordainer and judge of the universe.

Alhamdulillah

TahmidAl-hamdu lilahAl-ḥamdu li-llāh
Al-ḥamdu lil-lāh or Alḥamdulillāh is an Arabic phrase meaning "praise be to God", sometimes translated as "thank God."

Takbir

Allahu AkbarGod is greatAllāhu Akbar
The form is the nominative of Allah, meaning "God".

Shahada

shahadahThere is no God but AllahLa ilaha ilallah
The basic creed of Islam, the Shahada (recited under oath to enter the religion), involves لا إله إلا الله, or, "I testify there is no god other than God."
The Shahada (الشهادة, "the testimony") is an Islamic creed, one of the Five Pillars of Islam, declaring belief in the oneness of God (tawhid) and the acceptance of Muhammad as God's prophet.

Basmala

Bismillah786Bismallah
The Basmala, also known by its incipit (بِاسم الله, "In the name of God"), is the Islamic phrase ' بِسْمِ اللهِ الرَّحْمٰنِ الرَّحِيْمِ "In the name of God, the Most Gracious, the Most Merciful".

Istighfar

AstaghfirullahIstaghfirallahʾAstaghfir allāh
Istighfar, is the act of seeking forgiveness from Allah.

Jesus in Islam

JesusIsaIslamic view of Jesus
Muslims reject the Christian doctrine of the Trinity and divinity of Jesus, comparing it to polytheism.
In Islam, ʿĪsā ibn Maryam, or Jesus, is understood to be the penultimate prophet and messenger of God (Allah) and (Christ), sent to guide the Children of Israel with a new revelation: Injīl (Arabic for "the gospel").

Shirk (Islam)

shirkmushrikidolatry
The deification or worship of anyone or anything other than God (shirk) is the greatest sin in Islam.
In Islam, shirk (شرك širk) is the sin of idolatry or polytheism, i.e., the deification or worship of anyone or anything besides God, i.e., Allah.

Fi sabilillah

Fi sabil Allahfor the sake of AllahFī sabīl allāh
The phrase fi sabilillah (في سبيل الله fī sabīli llāhi) is an Arabic expression meaning "in the cause of Allah", or more befittingly, "for the sake of Allah".

Prophets and messengers in Islam

Islamic prophetprophetprophets
As in the other Abrahamic religions, God is believed to communicate with his creation via revelations given to prophets to remind people of God.
Prophets in Islam (ٱلْأَنۢبِيَاء فِي ٱلْإِسْلَام‎ pl. الأنبياء,نب ) are individuals who Muslims believe were sent by God to various communities in order to serve as examples of ideal human behavior and to spread God's message on Earth.

Muhammad in Islam

MuhammadProphet MuhammadMohammed
The Quran in particular is believed by Muslims to be the verbatim word of God as revealed to Muhammad.
Muḥammad ibn ʿAbdullāh ibn ʿAbdul-Muṭṭalib ibn Hāshim (c. undefined 570 CE – 8 June 632 CE), commonly known as Muhammad, is the seal of the Messengers and Prophets of God in all the main branches of Islam.

Muslims

MuslimMoslemMoslems
The Quran in particular is believed by Muslims to be the verbatim word of God as revealed to Muhammad.
Muslims consider the Quran, their holy book, to be the verbatim word of God as revealed to the Islamic prophet and messenger Muhammad.

Muhammad

Prophet MuhammadMohammedMohammad
Hadith are the records of Muhammad's sayings and example, and Hadith Qudsi is a sub-category of hadith, which Muslims regard as the words of God repeated by Muhammad.
He is viewed as the final prophet of God in all the main branches of Islam, though some modern denominations diverge from this belief.

Ilah

ʾilāhil-ilāh
The word is thought to be derived by contraction from al-ilāh, which means "the god", and is related to El and Elah, the Hebrew and Aramaic words for God.
The term is used throughout the Quran in passages discussing the existence of God or the beliefs in other divinities by non-Muslims.

Gerhard Böwering

Gerhard Bowering
According to Gerhard Böwering,
According to Böwering, in contrast with pre-Islamic Arabian polytheism, God in Islam does not have associates and companions, nor is there any kinship between God (Allah) and jinn.

Isma'ilism

IsmailiIsmailisIsma'ili
According to Isma'ilism, God is absolutely transcendent and unknowable; beyond matter, energy, space, time, change, imaginings, intellect, positive as well as negative qualities.
With the eventual development of Twelverism into the more literalistic (zahir) oriented Akhbari and later Usuli schools of thought, Shi'i Islam developed into two separate directions: the metaphorical Ismaili group focusing on the mystical path and nature of God, with the "Imām of the Time" representing the manifestation of esoteric truth and intelligible reality, with the more literalistic Twelver group focusing on divine law (sharia) and the deeds and sayings (sunnah) of Muhammad and the Twelve Imams who were guides and a light to God.

Abrahamic religions

AbrahamicAbrahamic religionAbrahamic faiths
As in the other Abrahamic religions, God is believed to communicate with his creation via revelations given to prophets to remind people of God.
Islam arose in the Arabian Peninsula in the 7th century CE with a strictly unitary view of God.

Glossary of Islam

List of Islamic terms in ArabicIslamic termIslamic terminology

Wahhabism

WahhabiWahhabisWahabi
Salafism and Wahhabism refuse interpretations on Quran to avoid altering of its message, thus taking the descriptions of God literally and oppose widespread theological concepts including the Ash'ari view.
The term Wahhabi(sm) is often used polemically and adherents commonly reject its use, preferring to be called Salafi or muwahhid, claiming to emphasize the principle of tawhid (the "uniqueness" and "unity" of God) or monotheism, dismissing other Muslims as practising shirk (idolatry).

Ashʿari

Ash'ariAshariAsharite
Salafism and Wahhabism refuse interpretations on Quran to avoid altering of its message, thus taking the descriptions of God literally and oppose widespread theological concepts including the Ash'ari view. Ash'ari and Maturidi are in agreement about God's attributes are eternal but neither hold to be metaphorically (unlike Mu'tazilla) nor literally.
Abu al-Hasan al-Ashʿari was noted for his teachings on atomism, among the earliest Islamic philosophies, and for al-Ashʿari this was the basis for propagating the view that God created every moment in time and every particle of matter.