GoldSrc

GoldSource engineGoldSrc engine
GoldSrc ("gold source") is a game engine developed by Valve Corporation, first showcased in the 1998 first-person shooter game Half-Life.wikipedia
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Half-Life (video game)

Half-LifeHalf LifeHalf-Life'' (video game)
GoldSrc ("gold source") is a game engine developed by Valve Corporation, first showcased in the 1998 first-person shooter game Half-Life.
The game's engine, GoldSrc, is a heavily modified version of the Quake engine licensed from id Software.

Valve Corporation

ValveValve SoftwareValve’s
GoldSrc ("gold source") is a game engine developed by Valve Corporation, first showcased in the 1998 first-person shooter game Half-Life.
For its first product, Valve settled on a concept for a horror first-person shooter (FPS) using a modified Quake engine licensed from id Software, later known as GoldSrc.

Source (game engine)

SourceSource engineSource game engine
GoldSrc was succeeded by the Source engine with the releases of Counter-Strike: Source and Half-Life 2 in 2004, though Valve continues to support the engine with periodic updates.
It debuted as the successor to GoldSrc with Counter-Strike: Source in June 2004, followed shortly by Half-Life 2 in November, and has been in active development since.

Quake engine

Quake'' engineQuakeDarkPlaces
Elements of GoldSrc are based on a heavily modified version of id Software's Quake engine.
GoldSource engine – The first engine to be created by Valve Corporation. It was used in the Half-Life series, gave rise to the Source engine.

Gabe Newell

While the engine served as the basis for GoldSrc, Gabe Newell has stated that a majority of the code used in the engine was created by Valve themselves, not taken from Quake.
Newell and Harrington used their money to fund Valve through the development of Half-Life and the GoldSrc game engine.

Day of Defeat

Following Half-Life release, the engine powered future titles developed by or with oversight from Valve, including Half-Life expansions, Day of Defeat, and multiple titles in the Counter-Strike series. Team Fortress Classic, released officially by Valve Corporation in 1999, was one of such games (based on an older Quake mod, Team Fortress). Counter-Strike, Ricochet, and Day of Defeat were also originally modifications, the rights to which were purchased by Valve.
In 2013, Valve released an update for Day of Defeat, alongside other GoldSrc games developed by Valve, which included versions of the game for Mac OS X and Linux.

List of GoldSrc mods

RicochetHalf-Life'' ModHalf-Life'' mods
Team Fortress Classic, released officially by Valve Corporation in 1999, was one of such games (based on an older Quake mod, Team Fortress). Counter-Strike, Ricochet, and Day of Defeat were also originally modifications, the rights to which were purchased by Valve.
This is a list of GoldSrc mods (modifications) for the video game Half-Life.

Quake II

Quake II Mission Pack: Ground ZeroBittermanQuake 2
The engine also reuses code from other games in the Quake series, including QuakeWorld, and Quake II, but this reuse is minimal in comparison to that of the original Quake.
However, the final version runs on a heavily modified version of the Quake engine, GoldSrc, with a small amount of the Quake II code.

Counter-Strike: Condition Zero

Counter-Strike evolved into its own series with the release of Counter-Strike: Condition Zero in 2004, and while Counter-Strike: Source ran on the Source engine, further games in the series still used GoldSrc.
The game was released in 2004 using the GoldSrc engine.

Team Fortress Classic

Team FortressTFC
Team Fortress Classic, released officially by Valve Corporation in 1999, was one of such games (based on an older Quake mod, Team Fortress). Counter-Strike, Ricochet, and Day of Defeat were also originally modifications, the rights to which were purchased by Valve.
Based on the 1996 Quake modification Team Fortress, Valve ported it to GoldSrc engine as a way of promoting Half-Life software development kit.

James Bond 007: Nightfire

007: NightfireNightfire007 Nightfire
Rewolf Software used the engine for the game Gunman Chronicles in 2000, and the PC version of James Bond 007: Nightfire was developed by Gearbox Software using a modified version of GoldSrc in 2002.
Nightfire was developed by Eurocom for the GameCube, PlayStation 2, and Xbox video game consoles, while Gearbox Software developed the game for Microsoft Windows using the GoldSrc engine.

Half-Life: Blue Shift

Blue ShiftHigh Definition Packsecond expansion
The game was followed up with two expansions, Half-Life: Opposing Force and Half-Life: Blue Shift, both of which ran GoldSrc and were developed by Gearbox Software.

Sven Co-op

Notable titles include Natural Selection, Cry of Fear and Sven Co-op, with Valve's Team Fortress Classic, Counter-Strike, and Day of Defeat all being based on GoldSrc mods of the same names.
Sven Co-op is a first-person shooter based on Half-Life, using its GoldSrc game engine.

Counter-Strike

Counter-Strike'' seriesCounter-Strike 1.6CS
Following Half-Life release, the engine powered future titles developed by or with oversight from Valve, including Half-Life expansions, Day of Defeat, and multiple titles in the Counter-Strike series. Team Fortress Classic, released officially by Valve Corporation in 1999, was one of such games (based on an older Quake mod, Team Fortress). Counter-Strike, Ricochet, and Day of Defeat were also originally modifications, the rights to which were purchased by Valve. Counter-Strike Neo, Counter-Strike Online, and Counter-Strike Nexon: Zombies, released in 2005, 2008, and 2014 respectively, utilized GoldSrc as their basis, despite the development of the Source engine having been completed and the first version released.
It used the Half-Life GoldSrc engine, similar to its predecessor.

Half-Life: Decay

Decay
Half-Life: Decay, an expansion pack for Half-Life only released on PlayStation 2, was released in 2001 alongside Half-Life debut on the platform.

Counter-Strike Online

counter-strike
Counter-Strike Neo, Counter-Strike Online, and Counter-Strike Nexon: Zombies, released in 2005, 2008, and 2014 respectively, utilized GoldSrc as their basis, despite the development of the Source engine having been completed and the first version released.

Gunman Chronicles

Rewolf Software used the engine for the game Gunman Chronicles in 2000, and the PC version of James Bond 007: Nightfire was developed by Gearbox Software using a modified version of GoldSrc in 2002.

Cry of Fear

Notable titles include Natural Selection, Cry of Fear and Sven Co-op, with Valve's Team Fortress Classic, Counter-Strike, and Day of Defeat all being based on GoldSrc mods of the same names.

Game engine

enginegraphics engine3D engine
GoldSrc ("gold source") is a game engine developed by Valve Corporation, first showcased in the 1998 first-person shooter game Half-Life.

First-person shooter

first person shooterFPSfirst-person
GoldSrc ("gold source") is a game engine developed by Valve Corporation, first showcased in the 1998 first-person shooter game Half-Life.

Video game

video gamesgamevideogame
GoldSrc ("gold source") is a game engine developed by Valve Corporation, first showcased in the 1998 first-person shooter game Half-Life.

Id Software

idid MobileIdeas From the Deep
Elements of GoldSrc are based on a heavily modified version of id Software's Quake engine.

Counter-Strike: Source

Counter-Strike:SourceCSS
GoldSrc was succeeded by the Source engine with the releases of Counter-Strike: Source and Half-Life 2 in 2004, though Valve continues to support the engine with periodic updates. Counter-Strike evolved into its own series with the release of Counter-Strike: Condition Zero in 2004, and while Counter-Strike: Source ran on the Source engine, further games in the series still used GoldSrc.

Half-Life 2

Half Life 2Half-Life 2: Updatesecond
GoldSrc was succeeded by the Source engine with the releases of Counter-Strike: Source and Half-Life 2 in 2004, though Valve continues to support the engine with periodic updates.

Quake (video game)

QuakeMaliceQuake 1
The basis of GoldSrc is the engine used in the video game Quake, albeit with heavy modification by Valve Corporation, at the time called Valve Software.