A report on Gold Glove Award and Willie Mays

Roberto Alomar's 1994 Gold Glove Award
Mays with the San Francisco Giants in 1961
Gil Hodges was one of the first Gold Glove recipients, in 1957.
1952 Bowman Gum Willie Mays
Brooks Robinson won 16 Gold Gloves, the most of any position player.
Greg Maddux won 18 Gold Gloves, the most of any player.
The Catch: Mays hauls in Vic Wertz's drive near the wall in Game 1 of the 1954 World Series.
Willie Mays won 12 Gold Gloves and was elected to the all-time team.
Mays in 1954
Mark Belanger (pictured) won multiple Gold Gloves at shortstop along with teammates Davey Johnson and Bobby Grich at second base.
Mays in 1961
As of 2021 Nolan Arenado (with 5) has won the most Platinum Glove Awards of any player.
Mays in his later years with the Giants
Mays with the Mets in 1972
Mays with Queen Elizabeth II (center) and First Lady Betty Ford (left) at the White House in 1976
Mays at the final game at Shea Stadium on September 28, 2008
Mays and President Barack Obama aboard Air Force One, July 14, 2009
Mays walks with President George W. Bush, July 30, 2006
Mays with Queen Elizabeth II (left) and President Gerald Ford (center) at the White House in 1976
Mays with Telly Savalas (center) and his wife, Mae Louise (right), in 1976

He won his first of 12 Gold Glove Awards in 1957, a record for outfielders.

- Willie Mays

Among outfielders, Roberto Clemente and Willie Mays, who played primarily right field and center field, respectively, are tied for the lead with 12 Gold Gloves.

- Gold Glove Award
Roberto Alomar's 1994 Gold Glove Award

4 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Bonds in 1975

Bobby Bonds

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American right fielder in Major League Baseball from to, primarily with the San Francisco Giants.

American right fielder in Major League Baseball from to, primarily with the San Francisco Giants.

Bonds in 1975
Bonds, circa 1969
Bonds in 1975
Bonds in 1980

Noted for his outstanding combination of power hitting and speed, he was the first player to have more than two seasons of 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases, doing so a record five times (the record was matched only by his son Barry), and was the first to accomplish the feat in both major leagues; he became the second player to hit 300 career home runs and steal 300 bases, joining Willie Mays.

He was a three-time Gold Glove Award winner (1971, 1973–74), and a three-time All-Star (1971, 1973 and 1975, winning the All-Star MVP award in 1973).

Bonds in 2006

Barry Bonds

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American former professional baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB).

American former professional baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB).

Bonds in 2006
Bonds in 1993
Bonds on the field
Bonds at the plate with the Giants
Bonds batting against the Chicago Cubs in 2006
Bonds in August 2006 with the Giants
Bonds at the plate against the Rockies in 2007
Bonds's 756th home run ball in the Hall of Fame
Mug shot taken after 2007 indictment
Jon Dowd, the most well-known generic replacement for Bonds in MVP Baseball 2005

For his defensive play in the outfield, he won eight Gold Glove awards.

In 1993, Bonds left the Pirates to sign a lucrative free agent contract worth a then-record $43.75 million (equivalent to $ million in ) over six years with the Giants, with whom his father had spent the first seven years of his career, and with whom his godfather Willie Mays played 22 of his 24 Major League seasons.

Clemente in 1965

Roberto Clemente

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Puerto Rican professional baseball right fielder who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Puerto Rican professional baseball right fielder who played 18 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Pittsburgh Pirates.

Clemente in 1965
Clemente in the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve in September 1958.
Letter from State Senator John M. Walker to U.S. Senator Hugh Scott requesting an early release for Roberto Clemente from the Marine Corps for the 1959 season
A statue of Clemente outside of PNC Park in Pittsburgh.
<center>The Roberto Clemente Walker Congressional Gold Medal</center>
<center>Presidential Medal of Freedom</center>
<center>Presidential Citizens Medal</center>

He was the National League (NL) Most Valuable Player (MVP) in 1966, the NL batting leader in 1961, 1964, 1965, and 1967, and a Gold Glove Award winner for 12 consecutive seasons from 1961 through 1972.

On August 5 at Forbes Field, Clemente crashed into the right-field wall while making a pivotal play, depriving San Francisco's Willie Mays of a leadoff, extra-base hit in a game eventually won by Pittsburgh, 1–0.

Cincinnati Reds

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American professional baseball team based in Cincinnati.

American professional baseball team based in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Reds baseball team in 1909
Hall of famer Edd Roush led Cincinnati to the 1919 World Series.
Ted Kluszewski (1953)
Crosley Field (pictured in 1969), the Reds' home stadium from 1912 to 1970
Riverfront Stadium (pictured in 1974), the home stadium of the Reds from 1970 to 2002
Pete Rose at bat in a game at Dodger Stadium during the 1970s
George Foster slugged 52 home runs in 1977, earning the NL MVP award.
Eric Davis in 1990
Opening day at Riverfront Stadium, 1995
Great American Ball Park, the Reds' home stadium since 2003
Ken Griffey Jr. played in his hometown of Cincinnati from 2000 to 2008.
Joey Votto, first baseman (2007–present)
Great American Ball Park opened in 2003 along the Ohio River.
Logo (1915–1919)
Scott Rolen wearing the current Reds away uniform, featuring classic lettering.
Barry Larkin playing in Riverfront Stadium in 1990
Frank Robinson
Eppa Rixey
Ernie Lombardi
The Ohio Cup trophy
Marty Brennaman, the Hall of Fame "voice of the Reds"

The Reds trailed 9–3, and New York's manager Yogi Berra and legendary outfielder Willie Mays, at the request of National League president Warren Giles, appealed to fans in left field to restrain themselves.

In 2010, with NL MVP Joey Votto and Gold Glovers Brandon Phillips and Scott Rolen, the Reds posted a 91–71 record and were NL Central champions.