Golden Age of Radio

old-time radioradioold time radioGolden AgeRadio's Golden Ageold-timeradio showclassic radioFriends of Old Time Radioradio broadcasting
The Golden Age of Radio, also known as the old-time radio (OTR) era, was an era of radio programming in the United States during which radio was the dominant electronic home entertainment medium.wikipedia
944 Related Articles

Music radio

Musicradiocommercial radio
In the 1950s television superseded radio as the most popular broadcast medium, and commercial radio programming has shifted to narrower formats of news, talk, sports and music.
After television replaced old time radio's dramatic content, music formats became dominant in many countries.

AM broadcasting

AMAM radioAM station
Between 1900 and 1920 the first technology for transmitting sound by radio was developed, AM (amplitude modulation), and AM broadcasting sprang up around 1920.
AM radio remained the dominant method of broadcasting for the next 30 years, a period called the "Golden Age of Radio", until television broadcasting became widespread in the 1950s and received most of the programming previously carried by radio.

Variety show

varietyvariety showsvariety series
A variety of new entertainment formats and genres were created for the new medium, many of which later migrated to television: radio plays, mystery serials, soap operas, quiz shows, talent shows, daytime and evening variety hours, situation comedies, play-by-play sports, children's shows, cooking shows, and more.
Radio variety shows were the predominant form of light entertainment during the Golden Age of Radio from the late 1920s through the 1940s; such radio shows typically included a house vocalist, music from the house band, a stand-up monologue and a short comedy sketch.

Mutual Broadcasting System

MutualMutual Radio NetworkMutual Network
In the golden age of U.S. radio drama, Mutual was best known as the original network home of The Lone Ranger and The Adventures of Superman and as the long-time radio residence of The Shadow.

Westwood One

Dial GlobalWestwood One NetworkDial Global Networks
As of November 14, 2013, Mutual, ABC and NBC's radio assets now reside with Cumulus Media's Westwood One division through numerous mergers and acquisitions since the mid-1980s, with ABC maintaining a limited radio ownership presence.
As a result of all of these acquisitions, Cumulus Media now controls the remnants of all four of the major networks from the Golden Age of Radio: the former NBC Radio Network, the Mutual Broadcasting System, the distribution rights to most of CBS, the former ABC Radio Network, and CBS Sports Radio (CBS Radio owned stations, but were merged with Entercom on November 17, 2017; ABC, which still owns a few stations outside its original network primarily for ESPN Radio as of December 18, 2015, pulled its content from Cumulus on January 1, 2015; and NBC, after having its content dropped from Westwood One in 2015, moved its content to iHeartMedia in 2016.) Among the numerous other holdings Cumulus now controls are the libraries of Transtar, RKO, Waitt, Jones, BPI, Watermark, and Drake-Chenault.

Fred Allen

Town Hall Tonight[Fred] AllenAllen's Alley
Radio attracted top comedy talents from vaudeville and Hollywood for many years: Bing Crosby, Abbott and Costello, Fred Allen, Jack Benny, Victor Borge, Fanny Brice, Billie Burke, Bob Burns, Judy Canova, Eddie Cantor, Jimmy Durante, Phil Harris, Bob Hope, Groucho Marx, Jean Shepherd, Red Skelton and Ed Wynn.
His absurdist, topically pointed radio program The Fred Allen Show (1932–1949) made him one of the most popular and forward-looking humorists in the Golden Age of American radio.

Red Skelton

The Red Skelton ShowFreddy the FreeloaderRichard Bernard "Red" Skelton
Radio attracted top comedy talents from vaudeville and Hollywood for many years: Bing Crosby, Abbott and Costello, Fred Allen, Jack Benny, Victor Borge, Fanny Brice, Billie Burke, Bob Burns, Judy Canova, Eddie Cantor, Jimmy Durante, Phil Harris, Bob Hope, Groucho Marx, Jean Shepherd, Red Skelton and Ed Wynn.
He was best known for his national radio and television shows between 1937 and 1971, especially as host of the television program The Red Skelton Show.

Easy Aces

mr. ace and JANE
Situational comedies also gained popularity, such as Amos 'n' Andy, Burns and Allen, Easy Aces, Ethel and Albert, Fibber McGee and Molly, The Goldbergs, The Great Gildersleeve, The Halls of Ivy (which featured screen star Ronald Colman and his wife Benita Hume), Meet Corliss Archer, Meet Millie, and Our Miss Brooks.
Easy Aces is an American serial radio comedy (1930–1945).

Meet Corliss Archer

A Kiss for Corlissa popular radio showCorliss Archer
Situational comedies also gained popularity, such as Amos 'n' Andy, Burns and Allen, Easy Aces, Ethel and Albert, Fibber McGee and Molly, The Goldbergs, The Great Gildersleeve, The Halls of Ivy (which featured screen star Ronald Colman and his wife Benita Hume), Meet Corliss Archer, Meet Millie, and Our Miss Brooks.
Meet Corliss Archer is an American radio program from radio's Golden Age that ran from January 7, 1943, to September 30, 1956.

Our Miss Brooks

of the same nameTV series
Situational comedies also gained popularity, such as Amos 'n' Andy, Burns and Allen, Easy Aces, Ethel and Albert, Fibber McGee and Molly, The Goldbergs, The Great Gildersleeve, The Halls of Ivy (which featured screen star Ronald Colman and his wife Benita Hume), Meet Corliss Archer, Meet Millie, and Our Miss Brooks.
It began as a radio show broadcast on CBS from 1948 to 1957.

WSM (AM)

WSMWSM-AMWSM Radio
In 1925, WSM Barn Dance went on the air from Nashville.
During daytime hours, the station broadcast long-form radio, including both local and NBC network programs, in addition to music.

WWJ (AM)

WWJ8MKWWJ-AM
The first radio news program was broadcast on August 31, 1920, on the station 8MK in Detroit; owned by The Detroit News, the station covered local election results.
After World War II, especially as television grew in household reach and popularity, music and regularly scheduled local news would make up a larger portion of its format as television eroded support for variety programming on radio and the Golden Age of Radio gradually ended.

Ozark Jubilee

Jubilee USACountry Music JubileeCountry Music Hayride
NBC also aired The Red Foley Show from 1951 to 1961, and ABC Radio carried Ozark Jubilee from 1953 to 1961.
During the late 1940s and 1950s, Springfield broadcasters Ralph Foster and Si Siman produced nationally syndicated radio shows through Foster's RadiOzark Enterprises, and aired them locally over his KWTO, also a stepping-stone for numerous country stars.

Mel Blanc

Mel Blanc Audio MediaMel Blanc AudiomediaThe Mel Blanc Show
Radio comedy ran the gamut from the small town humor of Lum and Abner, Herb Shriner and Minnie Pearl to the dialect characterizations of Mel Blanc and the caustic sarcasm of Henry Morgan.
During the golden age of radio, Blanc also frequently performed on the programs of comedians from the era, including Jack Benny, Abbott and Costello, Burns and Allen, The Great Gildersleeve and Judy Canova.

Remote broadcast

live shotremotebroadcasting
In addition, the capability of the new medium to get information to people created the format of modern radio news: headlines, remote reporting, sidewalk interviews (such as Vox Pop), panel discussions, weather reports, farm reports.
The first airing of a remote broadcast came in 1924, when Loew's Theater publicist and WHN (New York City) station manager Nils Granlund leased telegraph lines from Western Union to provide the first link in what became called cabaret broadcasting." By early 1925, Granlund had established remote lines between WHN and more than thirty New York City jazz nightclubs, including the Silver Slipper, The Parody Club, the Cotton Club, the Strand Roof, and Club Moritz. These big band remotes would become a staple of the old-time radio era, lasting well into the 1950s.

Jack Benny

The Jack Benny ProgramBennyThe Jack Benny Show
Radio attracted top comedy talents from vaudeville and Hollywood for many years: Bing Crosby, Abbott and Costello, Fred Allen, Jack Benny, Victor Borge, Fanny Brice, Billie Burke, Bob Burns, Judy Canova, Eddie Cantor, Jimmy Durante, Phil Harris, Bob Hope, Groucho Marx, Jean Shepherd, Red Skelton and Ed Wynn.
In 1941, NBC celebrated Benny's tenth anniversary in radio in an unprecedented manner, broadcasting part of a banquet dedicated to him, in which the network conceded the Sunday 7 to 7.30 pm slot to Benny instead of the sponsor, as it was the custom during the Golden Age of Radio.

Bobby Benson and the B-Bar-B Riders

Bobby Benson's AdventuresThe H-Bar-O Rangers
The line-up of late afternoon adventure serials included Bobby Benson and the B-Bar-B Riders, The Cisco Kid, Jack Armstrong, the All-American Boy, Captain Midnight, and The Tom Mix Ralston Straight Shooters.
Bobby Benson and the B-Bar-B Riders is an old-time radio juvenile Western adventure program in the United States, one of the first juvenile radio programs.

Quiet, Please

Quiet PleaseQuiet, Please!
Radio dramas were presented on such programs as 26 by Corwin, NBC Short Story, Arch Oboler's Plays, Quiet, Please, and CBS Radio Workshop.
Quiet, Please! was a radio fantasy and horror program created by Wyllis Cooper, also known for creating Lights Out.

Norman Corwin

26 by CorwinColumbia Presents CorwinNorman Corwin Presents
Radio dramas were presented on such programs as 26 by Corwin, NBC Short Story, Arch Oboler's Plays, Quiet, Please, and CBS Radio Workshop.
Corwin was a major figure during the Golden Age of Radio.

Bing Crosby

Bing Crosby ProductionsCrosbyBing
Radio attracted top comedy talents from vaudeville and Hollywood for many years: Bing Crosby, Abbott and Costello, Fred Allen, Jack Benny, Victor Borge, Fanny Brice, Billie Burke, Bob Burns, Judy Canova, Eddie Cantor, Jimmy Durante, Phil Harris, Bob Hope, Groucho Marx, Jean Shepherd, Red Skelton and Ed Wynn.
During the Golden Age of Radio, performers had to create their shows live, sometimes even redoing the program a second time for the west coast time zone.

The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes

The Adventures of Sherlock Holmesradio seriesSherlock Holmes
During the 1940s, Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, famous for playing Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson in films, repeated their characterizations on radio on The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, which featured both original stories and episodes directly adapted from Arthur Conan Doyle's stories.
The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is an old-time radio show which aired in the USA from 1939 to 1950.

Lux Radio Theatre

Lux Radio TheaterThe Lux Radio TheatreLux Summer Theatre
Lux Radio Theatre and The Screen Guild Theater presented adaptations of Hollywood movies, performed before a live audience, usually with cast members from the original films.
Lux Radio Theatre, sometimes spelled Lux Radio Theater, a classic radio anthology series, was broadcast on the NBC Blue Network (1934–35) (owned by the National Broadcasting Company, later predecessor of American Broadcasting Company [ABC] in 1943 /1945); CBS Radio network (Columbia Broadcasting System) (1935-54), and NBC Radio (1954–55).

The Screen Guild Theater

Screen Guild TheaterScreen Guild PlayersScreen Guild Theatre
Lux Radio Theatre and The Screen Guild Theater presented adaptations of Hollywood movies, performed before a live audience, usually with cast members from the original films.
The Screen Guild Theater is a radio anthology series broadcast from 1939 until 1952 during the Golden Age of Radio.

Suspense (radio drama)

Suspenseradio program of the same name1940 radio drama
Suspense, Escape, The Mysterious Traveler and Inner Sanctum Mystery were popular thriller anthology series.
One of the premier drama programs of the Golden Age of Radio, was subtitled "radio's outstanding theater of thrills" and focused on suspense thriller-type scripts, usually featuring leading Hollywood actors of the era.

Inner Sanctum Mystery

Inner SanctumInner Sanctum Mysteriespopular radio series
Suspense, Escape, The Mysterious Traveler and Inner Sanctum Mystery were popular thriller anthology series.
Inner Sanctum Mystery, also known as Inner Sanctum, a popular old-time radio program that aired from January 7, 1941, to October 5, 1952, was created by producer Himan Brown and was based on the imprint given to the mystery novels of Simon & Schuster.