Golden Age of Television

Golden AgeTelevision's Golden AgeTV's Golden AgeAmerican Golden Age of Televisionbygone era in television historyearly days of televisionearly live televisionearly years of television dramagolden age live TVGolden Age of British Television
The first Golden Age of Television is the era of live television production in the United States, roughly from the late 1940s to the early 1960s.wikipedia
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The Philco Television Playhouse

The Philco-Goodyear Television PlayhousePhilco TV PlayhousePhilco Playhouse
Examples include Kraft Television Theatre (debuted May 7, 1947), The Chevrolet Tele-Theatre (debuted September 27, 1948), Television Playhouse (debuted December 4, 1947), The Philco Television Playhouse (debuted October 3, 1948), Westinghouse Studio One (debuted November 7, 1948), and Your Show Time (debuted January 21, 1949). Most of these programs were produced as installments of live dramatic anthologies, such as The Philco Television Playhouse, Kraft Television Theatre and Playhouse 90.
It was one of the most respected dramatic shows of the Golden Age of Television, winning a 1954 Peabody Award and receiving eight Emmy nominations between 1951 and 1956.

Horton Foote

The ChaseThe Horton Foote Plays
Critics and viewers looked forward to new teleplays by Paddy Chayefsky, Horton Foote, Tad Mosel, Reginald Rose, Rod Serling, William Templeton, Gore Vidal and others.
Albert Horton Foote Jr. (March 14, 1916 – March 4, 2009 ) was an American playwright and screenwriter, perhaps best known for his screenplays for the 1962 film To Kill a Mockingbird and the 1983 film Tender Mercies, and his notable live television dramas during the Golden Age of Television.

Paddy Chayefsky

Paddy ChayevskyChayefskyThe Passion of Josef D.
Critics and viewers looked forward to new teleplays by Paddy Chayefsky, Horton Foote, Tad Mosel, Reginald Rose, Rod Serling, William Templeton, Gore Vidal and others.
He was considered one of the most renowned dramatists of the so-called Golden Age of Television.

William Templeton (screenwriter)

William Templeton
Critics and viewers looked forward to new teleplays by Paddy Chayefsky, Horton Foote, Tad Mosel, Reginald Rose, Rod Serling, William Templeton, Gore Vidal and others.
William Pettigrew Templeton (7 June 1913 – 23 October 1973) was a Scottish playwright and screenwriter who made a major contribution to the Golden Age of Television writing a string of episodic dramas for American prime time television during the 1950s and 1960s, a time when many hour-long anthology drama series received wide critical acclaim.

Reginald Rose

Critics and viewers looked forward to new teleplays by Paddy Chayefsky, Horton Foote, Tad Mosel, Reginald Rose, Rod Serling, William Templeton, Gore Vidal and others.
Reginald Rose (December 10, 1920 – April 19, 2002) was an American film and television writer most widely known for his work in the early years of television drama.

Channel drift

drifteddriftingairing programming from outside their designated format
According to The Television Industry: A Historical Dictionary, "the Golden Age opened with Kraft Television Theatre on May 7, 1947, and ended with the last live show in the Playhouse 90 series in 1957;" the Golden Age is universally recognized to have ended by 1960, as the television audience and programming had shifted to less critically acclaimed fare, almost all of it taped or filmed.
While Nickelodeon has largely remained a children's-oriented channel throughout its history, its late-night Nick at Nite programming block (which for Nielsen ratings purposes is a separate channel from Nickelodeon) has drifted greatly from airing classic television (first from the Golden Age of Television, later expanding to shows from the 1960s and 1970s), to more recent shows still airing in local syndication, to its current focus on adolescent and young adult audiences similar to that of ABC Family.

Anthology series

anthologyanthology television seriesanthology drama
Most of these programs were produced as installments of live dramatic anthologies, such as The Philco Television Playhouse, Kraft Television Theatre and Playhouse 90.
In the history of television, live anthology dramas were especially popular during the Golden Age of Television of the 1950s with series such as The United States Steel Hour and The Philco Television Playhouse.

Multiple-camera setup

Multi-cameraMultipleMulti camera
I Love Lucy, in particular, took extensive steps toward matching the quality of the radio writing with a cinematic look worthy of feature films; to this effect, they established a multi-camera setup (a revolutionary process that would become an industry standard in the decades to come) to allow for a live studio audience, hired cinematographer Karl Freund to oversee filming,and recorded the series on movie-quality 35 mm film (the relatively high cost prevented the show from being filmed in color as Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz had originally hoped).
Before the pre-filmed continuing series became the dominant dramatic form on American television, the earliest anthology programs (see the Golden Age of Television) utilized multiple camera methods.

John Frankenheimer

Frankenheimer John FrankenheimerJohn Frankenheimer Productions
Although producer David Susskind, in a 1960s roundtable discussion with leading 1950s TV dramatists, defined TV's Golden Age as 1938 to 1954, the quiz show scandals of 1958, the final show of Playhouse 90 (debuted October 4, 1956) on May 18, 1960, and the departure of leading director John Frankenheimer brought the era to an end.
His departure from television is considered to signal the end of the Golden Age of Television.

The Bell Telephone Hour

Bell Telephone HourBell TelephoneThe Bell Telephone Hour Christmas Special
The Bell Telephone Hour, an NBC radio program, began its TV run featuring both classical and Broadway performers.
By this point, The Bell Telephone Hour was seen as a relic of a bygone era in television history.

Golden Age of Television (2000s–present)

golden age of televisiongolden agegolden era
Golden Age of Television (2000s–present)
Its name refers to the original Golden Age of Television which occurred in the 1950s.

Television and the Public Interest

vast wastelanda vast wasteland1961 speech
Indeed, the 1960–61 television season was noted by Time magazine as being the worst season in television up to that point, a sentiment echoed by Newton Minow, the head of the Federal Communications Commission, who lambasted the television networks for creating a "vast wasteland" of inferior programming in his speech "Television and the Public Interest."
In hindsight, the speech marked the end of a Golden Age of Television that had run through the 1950s, contrasting the highbrow programs of that decade with what had appeared on American television in 1960 and 1961.

1950s quiz show scandals

quiz show scandalsquiz show scandalscandal
Although producer David Susskind, in a 1960s roundtable discussion with leading 1950s TV dramatists, defined TV's Golden Age as 1938 to 1954, the quiz show scandals of 1958, the final show of Playhouse 90 (debuted October 4, 1956) on May 18, 1960, and the departure of leading director John Frankenheimer brought the era to an end.
The disappearance of quiz shows, many of which were (apparent) demonstrations of highbrow intelligence, and their replacement by dumbed-down game shows may have been one of many factors in the end of the Golden Age of Television; by 1960, numerous television critics were lamenting the rise of a vast wasteland of lowbrow television.

The Price Is Right (U.S. game show)

The Price Is RightThe New Price Is RightPrice is Right
Defending his upcoming series The New Price Is Right in 1972, he remarked:
The show's early reception was not as universally positive, as critics lamented the show's stark departure from the highbrow norms of the Golden Age of Television; original nighttime host Dennis James admitted that even his own housekeeper did not watch the show for that reason, but also defended the series, saying "CBS, who never wanted game shows, just put three game shows on the air, so they know they had better join the fight or lose out, because game shows have a tremendous appeal. The critics will always look down their noses, but you can't have The Bell Telephone Hour on and still stay in competition [...] If you want to read books, read books."

Sylvester Weaver (executive)

Pat WeaverSylvester "Pat" WeaverSylvester Weaver
In November 1960 former NBC head Sylvester "Pat" Weaver commented on the end of the Golden Age of Television in The Denver Post, saying: "Television has gone from about a dozen forms to just two – news shows and the Hollywood stories. The blame lies in the management of NBC, CBS and ABC. Management doesn't give the people what they deserve. I don't see any hope in the system as it is."
What once was the Golden Age of Television in the early 1950s slowly diminished by the end of the decade into the early 1960s, when he claimed networks made a series of bad decisions.

Television play

Television PlaysTV playplay for television
Like in the United States, this period is notable for great many television plays broadcast on Soviet TV. For example, in 1951-1954 the Central Television Studio broadcast three to six plays a week.
In the United States, television plays were seen mainly from 1948 to 1961, the period of live TV dramas which framed the Golden Age of Television.

History of television

televisionelectronic televisiontelevision history
History of television
Golden Age of Television, c. 1949–1960 in the US

Kraft Television Theatre

Kraft TheatreKraft Mystery TheatreKraft Mystery Theater
Examples include Kraft Television Theatre (debuted May 7, 1947), The Chevrolet Tele-Theatre (debuted September 27, 1948), Television Playhouse (debuted December 4, 1947), The Philco Television Playhouse (debuted October 3, 1948), Westinghouse Studio One (debuted November 7, 1948), and Your Show Time (debuted January 21, 1949). According to The Television Industry: A Historical Dictionary, "the Golden Age opened with Kraft Television Theatre on May 7, 1947, and ended with the last live show in the Playhouse 90 series in 1957;" the Golden Age is universally recognized to have ended by 1960, as the television audience and programming had shifted to less critically acclaimed fare, almost all of it taped or filmed. Most of these programs were produced as installments of live dramatic anthologies, such as The Philco Television Playhouse, Kraft Television Theatre and Playhouse 90.

Playhouse 90

According to The Television Industry: A Historical Dictionary, "the Golden Age opened with Kraft Television Theatre on May 7, 1947, and ended with the last live show in the Playhouse 90 series in 1957;" the Golden Age is universally recognized to have ended by 1960, as the television audience and programming had shifted to less critically acclaimed fare, almost all of it taped or filmed. Most of these programs were produced as installments of live dramatic anthologies, such as The Philco Television Playhouse, Kraft Television Theatre and Playhouse 90.

Mechanical television

mechanicalelectromechanical televisionBaird System
Prior to approximately 1948, there had been some attempts at television programming using the mechanical television process.

The Television Ghost

One of the first series made specifically for television to have a sustained run was CBS's 1931–33 murder-mystery series The Television Ghost, which ran for all 19 months that its flagship television station, then W2XAB, was on the air.

Broadcasting of sports events

Sportssports broadcastingsports broadcaster
By the time electronic television was standardized in the late 1930s, some more varied experimental programs, including live sportscasts and some game shows (such as the CBS Television Quiz and Truth or Consequences), were appearing; most television service was suspended beginning in 1942 because of World War II.

Game show

quiz showgameshowreality game show
By the time electronic television was standardized in the late 1930s, some more varied experimental programs, including live sportscasts and some game shows (such as the CBS Television Quiz and Truth or Consequences), were appearing; most television service was suspended beginning in 1942 because of World War II.

CBS Television Quiz

By the time electronic television was standardized in the late 1930s, some more varied experimental programs, including live sportscasts and some game shows (such as the CBS Television Quiz and Truth or Consequences), were appearing; most television service was suspended beginning in 1942 because of World War II.

Truth or Consequences

game show of a similar nameThe NEW Truth or ConsequencesTruth
By the time electronic television was standardized in the late 1930s, some more varied experimental programs, including live sportscasts and some game shows (such as the CBS Television Quiz and Truth or Consequences), were appearing; most television service was suspended beginning in 1942 because of World War II.