Golden Bull of Sicily

1198hereditary elevation of his title to kingheredity of the royal title established in 1212
The Golden Bull of Sicily (Zlatá bula sicilská, ) was a decree issued by Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor in Basel on 26 September 1212 that confirmed the royal title obtained by Ottokar I of Bohemia in 1198, declaring him and his heirs Kings of Bohemia.wikipedia
51 Related Articles

List of Bohemian monarchs

King of BohemiaDuke of BohemiaBohemia
The Golden Bull of Sicily (Zlatá bula sicilská, ) was a decree issued by Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor in Basel on 26 September 1212 that confirmed the royal title obtained by Ottokar I of Bohemia in 1198, declaring him and his heirs Kings of Bohemia.
The Duchy of Bohemia was established in 870 and raised to the Kingdom of Bohemia in 1198 (although several Bohemian monarchs ruled as non-hereditary Kings of Bohemia beforehand, first gaining the title in 1085).

Kingdom of Bohemia

BohemiaBohemianBohemian Kingdom
The kingship signified the exceptional status of Bohemia within the Holy Roman Empire.
It was officially recognized in 1212 by the Golden Bull of Sicily issued by Emperor Frederick II, elevating the Duchy of Bohemia to Kingdom status.

Ottokar I of Bohemia

Ottokar IPřemysl Otakar IOttokar
The Golden Bull of Sicily (Zlatá bula sicilská, ) was a decree issued by Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor in Basel on 26 September 1212 that confirmed the royal title obtained by Ottokar I of Bohemia in 1198, declaring him and his heirs Kings of Bohemia.
In 1212 Frederick granted the Golden Bull of Sicily to Bohemia.

Holy Roman Empire

ImperialHoly Roman EmperorGermany
The kingship signified the exceptional status of Bohemia within the Holy Roman Empire.
In 1212, King Ottokar I (bearing the title "king" since 1198) extracted a Golden Bull of Sicily (a formal edict) from the emperor Frederick II, confirming the royal title for Ottokar and his descendants and the Duchy of Bohemia was raised to a kingdom.

Přemyslid dynasty

PřemyslidPřemyslidsPremyslid dynasty
Ottokar's Přemyslid ancestor Vratislaus II had already been elevated to a Bohemian king by Emperor Henry IV in 1085, in return for his support during the Saxon revolt and the Investiture Controversy.
This title was reconfirmed by Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor and later on in Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor's Golden Bull of Sicily (1212).

Lands of the Bohemian Crown

Bohemian CrownCrown of BohemiaBohemia
When in 1346 King Charles IV united the rule over Bohemia and Germany in his hands, he established the Lands of the Bohemian Crown, which remained beyond the Empire's suzerainty and were not considered Imperial States.
The regality was ultimately confirmed by Philip's nephew the German king Frederick II, later the Holy Roman Emperor (1220−1250), in the Golden Bull of Sicily issued in 1212.

Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor

Frederick IIEmperor Frederick IIFrederick II of Hohenstaufen
The Golden Bull of Sicily (Zlatá bula sicilská, ) was a decree issued by Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor in Basel on 26 September 1212 that confirmed the royal title obtained by Ottokar I of Bohemia in 1198, declaring him and his heirs Kings of Bohemia.

Basel

Basel, SwitzerlandBasleBâle
The Golden Bull of Sicily (Zlatá bula sicilská, ) was a decree issued by Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor in Basel on 26 September 1212 that confirmed the royal title obtained by Ottokar I of Bohemia in 1198, declaring him and his heirs Kings of Bohemia.

Vratislaus II of Bohemia

Vratislaus IIVratislav IIVratislaus
Ottokar's Přemyslid ancestor Vratislaus II had already been elevated to a Bohemian king by Emperor Henry IV in 1085, in return for his support during the Saxon revolt and the Investiture Controversy.

Henry IV, Holy Roman Emperor

Henry IVEmperor Henry IVHenry IV of Germany
Ottokar's Přemyslid ancestor Vratislaus II had already been elevated to a Bohemian king by Emperor Henry IV in 1085, in return for his support during the Saxon revolt and the Investiture Controversy.

Duchy of Saxony

SaxonySaxonDuke of Saxony
Ottokar's Přemyslid ancestor Vratislaus II had already been elevated to a Bohemian king by Emperor Henry IV in 1085, in return for his support during the Saxon revolt and the Investiture Controversy.

Investiture Controversy

lay investitureInvestiture ConflictInvestiture Crisis
Ottokar's Přemyslid ancestor Vratislaus II had already been elevated to a Bohemian king by Emperor Henry IV in 1085, in return for his support during the Saxon revolt and the Investiture Controversy.

Prague

Prague, Czech RepublicPrague, CzechoslovakiaPraha
He was crowned at Prague by Archbishop Egilbert of Trier the next year, the title however was not hereditary and upon his death in 1092, his brother Conrad I succeeded him again as Bohemian duke.

Egilbert

Egilbert, Archbishop of TrierEngelbert
He was crowned at Prague by Archbishop Egilbert of Trier the next year, the title however was not hereditary and upon his death in 1092, his brother Conrad I succeeded him again as Bohemian duke.

Electorate of Trier

TrierElectoral-TrierArchbishop-Elector of Trier
He was crowned at Prague by Archbishop Egilbert of Trier the next year, the title however was not hereditary and upon his death in 1092, his brother Conrad I succeeded him again as Bohemian duke.

Conrad I, Duke of Bohemia

Conrad IConradConrad I of Bohemia
He was crowned at Prague by Archbishop Egilbert of Trier the next year, the title however was not hereditary and upon his death in 1092, his brother Conrad I succeeded him again as Bohemian duke.

Vladislaus II, Duke and King of Bohemia

Vladislaus II of BohemiaVladislaus IIVladislaus II, Duke of Bohemia
In 1158 Vratislaus' grandson Vladislaus II achieved kingship again, bestowed by Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa, whom he had accompanied on his Italian campaign against Milan, but failed to secure the succession of his eldest son Frederick.

Frederick I, Holy Roman Emperor

Frederick BarbarossaFrederick I BarbarossaFrederick I
In 1158 Vratislaus' grandson Vladislaus II achieved kingship again, bestowed by Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa, whom he had accompanied on his Italian campaign against Milan, but failed to secure the succession of his eldest son Frederick.

Milan

Milan, ItalyMilanoMilano, Italy
In 1158 Vratislaus' grandson Vladislaus II achieved kingship again, bestowed by Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa, whom he had accompanied on his Italian campaign against Milan, but failed to secure the succession of his eldest son Frederick.

Frederick, Duke of Bohemia

FrederickFrederick of BohemiaFrederick I
In 1158 Vratislaus' grandson Vladislaus II achieved kingship again, bestowed by Emperor Frederick I Barbarossa, whom he had accompanied on his Italian campaign against Milan, but failed to secure the succession of his eldest son Frederick.

Otto IV, Holy Roman Emperor

Otto IVOtto of BrunswickEmperor Otto IV
In September 1198 Frederick's younger half-brother Ottokar I made use of the rivalry among Otto IV from the House of Welf and the Hohenstaufen duke Philip of Swabia, youngest son of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa, who both had been elected King of the Romans.

House of Welf

WelfHouse of GuelphWelfs
In September 1198 Frederick's younger half-brother Ottokar I made use of the rivalry among Otto IV from the House of Welf and the Hohenstaufen duke Philip of Swabia, youngest son of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa, who both had been elected King of the Romans.

Hohenstaufen

House of HohenstaufenStauferStaufen
In September 1198 Frederick's younger half-brother Ottokar I made use of the rivalry among Otto IV from the House of Welf and the Hohenstaufen duke Philip of Swabia, youngest son of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa, who both had been elected King of the Romans.

Philip of Swabia

PhilipPhilipp of SwabiaPhilip, Duke of Swabia
In September 1198 Frederick's younger half-brother Ottokar I made use of the rivalry among Otto IV from the House of Welf and the Hohenstaufen duke Philip of Swabia, youngest son of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa, who both had been elected King of the Romans.

King of the Romans

King of the GermansKingRex Romanorum
In September 1198 Frederick's younger half-brother Ottokar I made use of the rivalry among Otto IV from the House of Welf and the Hohenstaufen duke Philip of Swabia, youngest son of Emperor Frederick Barbarossa, who both had been elected King of the Romans.