Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada

Gonzalo Jimenez de QuesadaGonzalo de QuesadaJimenéz de QuesádaJiménez de QuesadaDon Gonzalo Jiménez de QuesadaJiménez de QuesádaQuesada
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Colombia

COLRepublic of ColombiaColombian
Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada y Rivera, also spelled as De Quezada and Ximénez, (1496 – other sources state 1506 or 1509 – Suesca, 16 February 1579 was a Spanish explorer and conquistador in northern South America, territories currently known as Colombia.
Spanish conquistador Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada led an expedition to the interior in April 1536, and christened the districts through which he passed "New Kingdom of Granada".

Hernán Pérez de Quesada

HernánbrotherHernán Pérez
He had three younger brothers; Hernán and Francisco, who also were conquistadors, and Melchor, and a sister, Andrea.
Second in command of the army of his elder brother, Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, Hernán was part of the first European expedition towards the inner highlands of the Colombian Andes.

New Kingdom of Granada

New GranadaRoyal Audience of Santa Fe de BogotáAudiencia of Bogotá
After 1569 he undertook explorations toward the east, searching for the elusive El Dorado, but returned to New Granada in 1573.
Starting in 1536, the conquistador Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada explored the extensive highlands of the interior of the region, by following the Magdalena River into the Andean cordillera.

El Dorado

EldoradoEl DaraAkator
After 1569 he undertook explorations toward the east, searching for the elusive El Dorado, but returned to New Granada in 1573.
In 1536, stories of El Dorado drew the Spanish conquistador Gonzalo Jimenez de Quesada and his army of 800 men away from their mission to find an overland route to Peru and up into the Andean homeland of the Muisca for the first time.

Bogotá

BogotaBogotá, ColombiaBogotá, D.C.
Passing Lake Fúquene and Lake Suesca, they reached Nemocón and Zipaquirá and finally entered the Muisca Confederation (ruled from Bacatá, present day Bogotá and Hunza, today known as Tunja).
Bogotá was founded as the capital of the New Kingdom of Granada on August 6, 1538, by Spanish conquistador Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada after a harsh expedition into the Andes conquering the Muisca.

Suesca

Susatá
Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada y Rivera, also spelled as De Quezada and Ximénez, (1496 – other sources state 1506 or 1509 – Suesca, 16 February 1579 was a Spanish explorer and conquistador in northern South America, territories currently known as Colombia. After a brief period of service in a frontier command (during which he suppressed an indigenous uprising) De Quesada, afflicted with leprosy, overcome with despair at his debts, owing more than 60 thousand ducats, was forced to seek a milder climate and died quietly, aged 70 to 85, in Suesca, an important market town in the New Kingdom of Granada.
When conquistador Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada arrived in Suesca in March 1537 he founded the modern town.

Bacatá

MuequetáMuyquyta
The settlement was at first called New City of Granada, but later they changed it to Santa Fé de Bogotá, now known simply as Bogotá, from the Chibcha word Bacatá, the name of one of the two main cacicazgos of the Muisca Confederation.
Bacatá was submitted to the Spanish Empire by the conquistadors led by Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada on April 20, 1537.

Tisquesusa

The zipa Tisquesusa, ruled in Bogotá; the other, the zaque Quemuenchatocha, ruled in Tunja.
Tisquesusa was the ruler of the southern Muisca Confederation at the time of the Spanish conquest of the Muisca, when the troops led by Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada and his brother entered the central Colombian highlands.

Conquistador

conquistadorsconquistadoresSpanish conquistadors
Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada y Rivera, also spelled as De Quezada and Ximénez, (1496 – other sources state 1506 or 1509 – Suesca, 16 February 1579 was a Spanish explorer and conquistador in northern South America, territories currently known as Colombia.

Muisca Confederation

confederationMuiscaprehistorical
Passing Lake Fúquene and Lake Suesca, they reached Nemocón and Zipaquirá and finally entered the Muisca Confederation (ruled from Bacatá, present day Bogotá and Hunza, today known as Tunja). The settlement was at first called New City of Granada, but later they changed it to Santa Fé de Bogotá, now known simply as Bogotá, from the Chibcha word Bacatá, the name of one of the two main cacicazgos of the Muisca Confederation.
The leader of the first and main expedition under Spanish flag was Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, with his brother Hernán second in command.

Tamalameque

A land party under De Quesada, with Hernán Pérez de Quesada (his brother), Juan San Martín, Juan del Junco (as second in command) Lázaro Fonte and Sergio Bustillo, struck south from Santa Marta, crossed the Cesar River, and arrived at Tamalameque on the Magdalena River.
The first conquest expedition into the interior of Colombia, led by Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada passed through Tamalameque in 1536.

Tunja

HunzaTunja, ColombiaTunja, Boyacá
Passing Lake Fúquene and Lake Suesca, they reached Nemocón and Zipaquirá and finally entered the Muisca Confederation (ruled from Bacatá, present day Bogotá and Hunza, today known as Tunja). The zipa Tisquesusa, ruled in Bogotá; the other, the zaque Quemuenchatocha, ruled in Tunja.
Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada parted from Santa Marta in April 1536, on the first main expedition into the Andes.

Muisca economy

economytraderstrade
After a brief period of service in a frontier command (during which he suppressed an indigenous uprising) De Quesada, afflicted with leprosy, overcome with despair at his debts, owing more than 60 thousand ducats, was forced to seek a milder climate and died quietly, aged 70 to 85, in Suesca, an important market town in the New Kingdom of Granada.
Pedro de Aguado, Pedro Simón, Juan de Castellanos, Juan de los Barrios, first conquistador Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada and many others have written about the economy of the Muisca.

List of conquistadors in Colombia

conquistadorconquistadorsGonzalo Suárez Rendón
Important conquistadors and explorers were Alonso de Ojeda, who landed first at Colombian soil and founded the first settlement Santa Cruz, Rodrigo de Bastidas, who founded the oldest still remaining city Santa Marta, Pedro de Heredia, who founded the important city of Cartagena in 1533, Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, who was the leader of the first and main expedition into the Andes (1536–1538), with his brother second in command and many other conquistadors, 80% of whom who didn't survive, and Nikolaus Federmann and Sebastián de Belalcázar who entered the Colombian interior from the northwest and south respectively.

Quemuenchatocha

The zipa Tisquesusa, ruled in Bogotá; the other, the zaque Quemuenchatocha, ruled in Tunja.
On August 20, 1537 the Spanish conquerors led by Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada found Quemuenchatocha sitting on this throne decorated with gold, emeralds and precious cloths and he was taken prisoner and deported to Suesca.

Nikolaus Federmann

Nicolaus FedermannNicolás de FedermanFedermann
Quesada remained in the region until the arrival of two expeditions at the end of 1538: Sebastián de Belalcázar from Quito, Ecuador, one of the captains of Pizarro who had mutinied against his leader; and Nikolaus Federmann, a German from Venezuela who had rebelled against another German named Hohermuth.
Their realm had already been largely conquered and occupied by Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, who considered the arrival of another conquistador unpleasant.

Sebastián de Belalcázar

Sebastián de BenalcázarSebastian de BelalcázarBenalcazar
Quesada remained in the region until the arrival of two expeditions at the end of 1538: Sebastián de Belalcázar from Quito, Ecuador, one of the captains of Pizarro who had mutinied against his leader; and Nikolaus Federmann, a German from Venezuela who had rebelled against another German named Hohermuth.
Crossing overland to the Magdalena River Valley, he entered the highlands of central Colombia, which had also been reached by Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada and Nikolaus Federmann, a German, in 1539.

Juan de Céspedes Ruiz

Juan de Céspedes
Knowledge about Juan de Céspedes has been provided by chroniclers Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada in his memoirs (1576), Pedro Simón in 1626, Juan Rodríguez Freyle in his work El Carnero (written between 1636 and 1638) and Lucas Fernández de Piedrahita (1688).

Spanish conquest of the Chibchan Nations

Spanish conquestChibchan NationsChitarero
In April 1536 the Spanish conquistador Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada led the main expedition into the heart of the Andes, where the Muisca Confederation was located, with around 800 Spanish soldiers and 85 horses.

Spanish conquest of the Muisca

Spanish conquestSpanishconquest
The leader of the first and main expedition under Spanish flag was Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, with his brother Hernán second in command.

Conjunto Multifamiliar Torres Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada

Torres Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada
The towers are named after the Spanish conquistador Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada, who after the expedition into the Andes and conquest of the Muisca was the first governor of the New Kingdom of Granada and the founder of Bogotá on August 6, 1538.

Sagipa

When the Panche were revolting against the new rulers in Zipacón, Sagipa took up peace negotiations with the leader of the Spanish troops, Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada pointing to the risk for both the Muisca and the Spanish of destroyed crops by the Panche.

Don Quixote

Don QuijoteDon Quixote de la ManchaDon Quijote de la Mancha
He has been suggested as a possible model for Cervantes' Don Quixote.

Mexico

MexicanMéxicoMEX
His father, Luis Jiménez de Quesada, was a hidalgo relative of Gonzalo Francisco de Cordoba, and he had two well-known distant cousins, the conquistadores of Mexico and Peru respectively: Hernán Cortés and Francisco Pizarro.