Google Spain v AEPD and Mario Costeja González

CostejaGoogle Spain SL, Google Inc. v Agencia Española de Protección de Datos, Mario Costeja GonzálezGoogle Spain v. AEPDGoogle v GonzálezGoogle v. Gonzalez
Google Spain SL, Google Inc. v Agencia Española de Protección de Datos, Mario Costeja González (2014) is a decision by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU).wikipedia
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General Data Protection Regulation

GDPRGeneral Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)General Data Protection Regulation 2016
The General Data Protection Regulation was mooted to include a right to be forgotten, but between the draft and the final version this was changed to a right to request erasure for a set of specific reasons.
Article 17 provides that the data subject has the right to request erasure of personal data related to them on any one of a number of grounds within 30 days, including noncompliance with Article 6(1) (lawfulness) that includes a case (f) if the legitimate interests of the controller are overridden by the interests or fundamental rights and freedoms of the data subject, which require protection of personal data (see also Google Spain SL, Google Inc. v Agencia Española de Protección de Datos, Mario Costeja González).

Bodil Lindqvist v Åklagarkammaren i Jönköping

Lindqvist
The court rejected Google's submission, supported by the Advocate General, that it could not be regarded as a data controller within the scope of the Data Protection Directive, adopting a literal interpretation of article 2(b), giving definitions and relying on Lindqvist.
It was cited in Costeja (2014), a controversial ruling that held an internet search engine operator established in the European Union (EU) is responsible for the processing that it carries out of personal information that appears on web pages published by third parties, confirming a right of erasure widely regarded as a so-called right to be forgotten.

Right to be forgotten

Melvin v. Reidallow users to be forgottendata protection laws of Europe
The decision was claimed as a so-called right to be forgotten, although the Court did not explicitly grant such a right, depending instead on the data subject's rights deriving from [[:wikisource:Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union#Article 7 .E2.80.93 Respect for private and family life|Article 7]] (respect for private and family life) and [[:wikisource:Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union#Article 8 .E2.80.93 Protection of personal data|Article 8]] (protection of personal data) of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.
The term "right to be forgotten" is a relatively new idea, though on May 13, 2014, the European Court of Justice legally solidified that the "right to be forgotten" is a human right when they ruled against Google in the Costeja case.

Niilo Jääskinen

Advocate General Niilo Jääskinen gave his opinion on 25 June 2013, after which judgment was given on 13 May 2014.
In 2014 he gave his opinion on Google Spain v AEPD and Mario Costeja González.

Jimmy Wales

Jimbo WalesJimmy ''Jimbo'' WalesJimmy 'Jimbo' Wales
Their advisory committee includes Luciano Floridi, Professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford, Frank La Rue, who served as UN Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression, from August 2008 to August 2014, and Jimmy Wales, a founder of Wikipedia.
On May 26, 2014, Google appointed Wales to serve on a seven-member committee on privacy in response to Google v. Gonzalez, which led to Google's being inundated with requests to remove websites from their search results.

Court of Justice of the European Union

CJEUCourt of JusticeCourt of Justice of the European Communities
Google Spain SL, Google Inc. v Agencia Española de Protección de Datos, Mario Costeja González (2014) is a decision by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU).

Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union

Charter of Fundamental RightsEU Charter of Fundamental RightsCFREU
The decision was claimed as a so-called right to be forgotten, although the Court did not explicitly grant such a right, depending instead on the data subject's rights deriving from [[:wikisource:Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union#Article 7 .E2.80.93 Respect for private and family life|Article 7]] (respect for private and family life) and [[:wikisource:Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union#Article 8 .E2.80.93 Protection of personal data|Article 8]] (protection of personal data) of the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.

La Vanguardia

La Vanguardia EspañolaLa Vanguardia newspaper
In 1998 the Spanish newspaper La Vanguardia published two announcements in its printed edition regarding the forced sale of properties arising from social security debts.

Ministry of Labour (Spain)

Ministry of LabourMinister of LabourMinister of Labour and Social Security
The announcements were published on the order of the Spanish Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs and their purpose was to attract as many bidders as possible.

World Wide Web

WebWWWthe web
A version of the edition was later made available on the web.

Google

Google Inc.Google, Inc.Google LLC
Costeja then contacted Google Spain in February 2010, asking that the links to the announcements be removed.

Spanish Data Protection Agency

Spanish Agency of data protectionAEPD
Costeja subsequently lodged a complaint with the Spanish Data Protection Agency (Agencia Española de Protección de Datos, AEPD) asking both that the newspaper be required to remove the data, and that Google Spain or Google Inc. be required to remove the links to the data.

European Court of Justice

Court of JusticeECJEuropean Court
Because new points of law were involved, the opinion of an advocate general was sought by the court.

European Commission

EU CommissionCommissionEC
Regarding the question relating to the so-called right to be forgotten, the court noted that Google Spain, Google Inc., the Greek, Austrian and Polish governments and the European Commission considered that this question should be answered in the negative.

European Union law

EU lawEuropean lawlaw of the European Union
The ruling balances the right to privacy and data protection in European law with the legitimate interest of the public to access such information, and it does not mandate that information is instantly removed upon request.

Citizenship of the European Union

European Union citizensEuropean citizenscitizens of the European Union
Google subsequently published an online form which can be used by EU citizens or EFTA nationals to request the removal of links from its search results if the data linked is "inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive in relation to the purposes for which they were processed".

European Free Trade Association

EFTAEuropean Free Trade Association (EFTA)Member states of the European Free Trade Association
Google subsequently published an online form which can be used by EU citizens or EFTA nationals to request the removal of links from its search results if the data linked is "inadequate, irrelevant or no longer relevant, or excessive in relation to the purposes for which they were processed".

Revenge porn

nonconsensual pornographyrevenge pornographycirculating pornographic pictures
On 19 June 2015, Google announced it would remove links to nonconsensual pornography ("revenge porn") on request.

Consumer Watchdog

Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer RightsConsumer Watchdog (USA)The Foundation for Taxpayer and Consumer Rights
However, the consumer advocacy group Consumer Watchdog subsequently called on Google to extend the right to be forgotten to US users, filing a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission.

Federal Trade Commission

FTCU.S. Federal Trade CommissionUnited States Federal Trade Commission
However, the consumer advocacy group Consumer Watchdog subsequently called on Google to extend the right to be forgotten to US users, filing a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission.

Article 29 Data Protection Working Party

Article 29 Working PartyEuropean Data Protection BoardEU's data protection group
The EU's Article 29 Data Protection Working Party issued its guidelines on how the ruling should be implemented on 26 November 2014.

Luciano Floridi

Floridi, LucianoFloridiLucian Floridi
Their advisory committee includes Luciano Floridi, Professor of Philosophy and Ethics of Information at the University of Oxford, Frank La Rue, who served as UN Special Rapporteur on the Promotion and Protection of the Right to Freedom of Opinion and Expression, from August 2008 to August 2014, and Jimmy Wales, a founder of Wikipedia.