Gorham Manufacturing Company

GorhamGorham CompanyGorham BuildingGorham SilverGorham Manufacturing Co.Gorham Manufacturing Company BuildingGorham, Inc.Gorham Silver CompanyGorham Silver Manufacturing CompanyGorham Silverware
The Gorham Manufacturing Company is one of the largest American manufacturers of sterling and silverplate and a foundry for bronze sculpture.wikipedia
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Providence, Rhode Island

ProvidenceProvidence, RIProvidence, R.I.
Gorham Silver was founded in Providence, Rhode Island, 1831 by Jabez Gorham, a master craftsman, in partnership with Henry L. Webster.
By the start of the 20th century, Providence hosted some of the largest manufacturing plants in the country, including Brown & Sharpe, Nicholson File, and Gorham Manufacturing Company.

William Christmas Codman

William Christmas Codman, one of Gorham's most noted designers, created the Chantilly design in 1895, which has become the most famous of Gorham's flatware patterns.
William Christmas Codman (December 25, 1839 - December 7, 1921) was a prominent silver and jewelry designer for Gorham Manufacturing Company of Providence, Rhode Island.

Lenox (company)

LenoxLenox chinaLenox Group
The unit was sold in 2005 to Department 56 in the Lenox holdings transaction, with the resulting company renamed as Lenox Group.
Lenox is an American company that sells tabletop, giftware and collectible products under the Lenox, Dansk, Reed & Barton, and Gorham brands.

Ladies' Mile Historic District

Ladies' MileLadies' Mile shopping districtLadies' Mile" Shopping District
In 1884, the company opened a store in the Ladies' Mile shopping district in Manhattan, New York City, but moved in 1905 to a Fifth Avenue building which it commissioned from architect Stanford White. This Queen Anne style building located at 889-891 Broadway at the corner of East 19th Street in the Flatiron District of Manhattan, New York City, within the Ladies' Mile Historic District, was designed by Edward Hale Kendall and built in 1883-1884 as the retail store of the company.
Between the Civil War and World War I, the district was the location of some of New York's most famous department stores and upscale retailers, including B. Altman, Best & Co., Arnold Constable, Bergdorf Goodman, Gorham Silver, W. & J. Sloane, Lord & Taylor, and Tiffany & Co..

Kerr & Co

In 1906, Gorham purchased another long-time rival, New Jersey-based Kerr & Co.
William B. Kerr & Co was sold to Gorham Manufacturing Company.

Fifth Avenue

5th AvenueFifthMuseum Mile
In 1884, the company opened a store in the Ladies' Mile shopping district in Manhattan, New York City, but moved in 1905 to a Fifth Avenue building which it commissioned from architect Stanford White.

Borg-Warner Trophy

Baby Borg trophyBorgWarner Indianapolis 500 Trophy
Gorham designed a number of elaborate trophies for sporting events, including the Borg-Warner Trophy for the Indianapolis 500, designed by Robert J. Hill.
In 1935, the Borg-Warner Automotive Company commissioned designer Robert J. Hill and Gorham, Inc., of Providence, Rhode Island to create the trophy at a cost of $10,000.

Rhode Island School of Design Museum

RISD MuseumRhode Island School of DesignRhode Island School of Design Museum of Art
Textron donated a large portion of the service along with other pieces to the Rhode Island School of Design Museum and they are on display in the permanent collection of American decorative arts.
An extraordinary collection of silver (approximately 2,000 pieces) produced by Providence's Gorham Manufacturing Company from the mid 19th through the mid 20th century is the cornerstone of a fine collection of American silver that also includes work by colonial silversmiths such as John Coney, Paul Revere and Samuel Casey.

Robert J. Hill

Gorham designed a number of elaborate trophies for sporting events, including the Borg-Warner Trophy for the Indianapolis 500, designed by Robert J. Hill.
Robert J. Hill (died May 29, 1953), nicknamed Bobil, was a draftsman, designer and the art director of the bronze division of Gorham, Inc. in Rhode Island.

Edward H. Kendall

Edward Hale KendallKendall
This Queen Anne style building located at 889-891 Broadway at the corner of East 19th Street in the Flatiron District of Manhattan, New York City, within the Ladies' Mile Historic District, was designed by Edward Hale Kendall and built in 1883-1884 as the retail store of the company.

Columbus (Bartholdi)

a replica of the statueColumbus'' (Bartholdi)statue
In 1893 a replica of the statue was cast in bronze and donated to the city of Providence by the Elmwood Association.
Cast in 1893, the statue of Columbus that stands on Elmwood Avenue was produced by the Gorham Manufacturing Company who commissioned master sculptor, Auguste Bartholdi.

Harriet Whitney Frishmuth

Harriet Frishmuth
A 1928 book published by the Gorham Company, Famous Small Bronzes - A Representative Exhibit Selected from the Works of Noted Contemporary Sculptors, featured full page photographs of sculptures by such notable sculptors as: Chester Beach, Gutzon Borglum, Allan Clark, Cyrus Dallin, Abastenia St. Leger Eberle, Laura Gardin Fraser, Harriet Frishmuth, Emil Fuchs, Karl Gruppe, Anna Hyatt Huntington, Isidore Konti, R. Tait McKenzie, Edith Parsons, Alexander Phimister Proctor, and Mahonri Young.
She also modeled ashtrays, bookends, and small figures for the Gorham Manufacturing Company.

Broadway (Manhattan)

BroadwayGreat White WayCanyon of Heroes
This Queen Anne style building located at 889-891 Broadway at the corner of East 19th Street in the Flatiron District of Manhattan, New York City, within the Ladies' Mile Historic District, was designed by Edward Hale Kendall and built in 1883-1884 as the retail store of the company.

Martelé (silver)

Martelé
The line was made from 1896 through the 1930s by the Gorham Manufacturing Company of Providence, Rhode Island under the direction of Gorham's chief executive, Edward Holbrook, and his chief designer, William Christmas Codman who was brought over from England in 1891.

Russeks

From 1924 to 1959, it was home to Russeks department store, and then Spear Securities from 1960, who changed the street level facade.
This was the Gorham Building, designed by Stanford White of McKim, Mead & White, and completed in 1904-1905 for the Gorham Manufacturing Company.

United States

AmericanU.S.USA
The Gorham Manufacturing Company is one of the largest American manufacturers of sterling and silverplate and a foundry for bronze sculpture.

Sterling silver

sterlingsilver(0.925 fine) silver
The Gorham Manufacturing Company is one of the largest American manufacturers of sterling and silverplate and a foundry for bronze sculpture.

Silverplate

nuclear-capableits fifteen B-29Operation Silverplate
The Gorham Manufacturing Company is one of the largest American manufacturers of sterling and silverplate and a foundry for bronze sculpture.

Fineness

caratkaratmillesimal fineness
The firm's chief product was spoons of coin silver.

George Wilkinson (architect)

George Wilkinson
He sought highly skilled foreign workmen to train his American workers and hired George Wilkinson, a premier designer and workshop manager, from England.

Holloware

hollowwarehollow warehollow-ware
The company has produced matching hollowware in both sterling and silverplate.

Manhattan

Manhattan, New YorkManhattan, New York CityNew York
In 1884, the company opened a store in the Ladies' Mile shopping district in Manhattan, New York City, but moved in 1905 to a Fifth Avenue building which it commissioned from architect Stanford White. This Queen Anne style building located at 889-891 Broadway at the corner of East 19th Street in the Flatiron District of Manhattan, New York City, within the Ladies' Mile Historic District, was designed by Edward Hale Kendall and built in 1883-1884 as the retail store of the company.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
In 1884, the company opened a store in the Ladies' Mile shopping district in Manhattan, New York City, but moved in 1905 to a Fifth Avenue building which it commissioned from architect Stanford White. This Queen Anne style building located at 889-891 Broadway at the corner of East 19th Street in the Flatiron District of Manhattan, New York City, within the Ladies' Mile Historic District, was designed by Edward Hale Kendall and built in 1883-1884 as the retail store of the company.

Stanford White

Madison Square Tragedy: The Murder of Stanford WhiteMurder of Stanford WhiteWhite, Stanford
In 1884, the company opened a store in the Ladies' Mile shopping district in Manhattan, New York City, but moved in 1905 to a Fifth Avenue building which it commissioned from architect Stanford White.

Textron

Textron SystemsE-Z-GOTextron Inc.
Textron purchased the company in 1967, a move that some critics claim decreased quality due to management's lack of understanding of Gorham's specialty, producing high-quality sterling silverware and holloware.