Gorkha Kingdom

GorkhaGorkhaliGorkhasKingdom of GorkhaNepalGorkha hill principalityGorkha EmpireGorkhalisHouse of GorkhaMr Gorkha
Gorkha Kingdom was a kingdom in the confederation of 24 states, known as Chaubisi rajya, located in the Indian subcontinent, present-day western Nepal.wikipedia
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Nepal

🇳🇵NepaleseFederal Democratic Republic of Nepal
Gorkha Kingdom was a kingdom in the confederation of 24 states, known as Chaubisi rajya, located in the Indian subcontinent, present-day western Nepal.
By the 18th century, the Gorkha Kingdom achieved the unification of Nepal.

Dravya Shah

Drabya Shah
The Gorkha Kingdom was established by Prince Dravya Shah, second son of King Yasho Brahma Shah of Lamjung Kingdom, on 1559 CE replacing the Khandka chiefs. The second son of Yasobramha, Dravya Shah conquered the Ghale people of neighbouring Ligligkot, now in Gorkha.
Dravya Shah (1559?–1570) was the king of the Gorkha Kingdom in the Indian subcontinent, present-day Nepal.

Chaubisi rajya

Chaubise24 principalities24 small principalities
Gorkha Kingdom was a kingdom in the confederation of 24 states, known as Chaubisi rajya, located in the Indian subcontinent, present-day western Nepal.
Gorkha

Prithvi Narayan Shah

King Prithvi Narayan ShahKing Prithivi Narayan Shah the GreatPN Shah
From 1736, the Gorkhalis engaged in a campaign of expansion begun by King Nara Bhupal Shah, which was continued by his son, King Prithvi Narayan Shah and grandson Prince Bahadur Shah.
Maharajadhiraja Prithivi Narayan Shah (1723 –1775; पृथ्वीनारायण शाह) was the last ruler of the Gorkha Kingdom in the Indian subcontinent, present-day Nepal, and first monarch of Kingdom of Nepal (also called Kingdom of Gorkha) on the Indian subcontinent.

Nara Bhupal Shah

Narbaupal Shah
From 1736, the Gorkhalis engaged in a campaign of expansion begun by King Nara Bhupal Shah, which was continued by his son, King Prithvi Narayan Shah and grandson Prince Bahadur Shah.
Nara Bhupal Shah (1697–1743) was the king of the Gorkha Kingdom in the Indian subcontinent, present-day Nepal; and the father of Prithvi Narayan Shah.

Newar people

NewarNewariNewars
Among their conquests, the most important and valuable acquisition was the wealthy Newar confederacy of Nepal Mandala centered in the Kathmandu Valley.
Newar rule in Nepal Mandala ended with its conquest by the Gorkha Kingdom in 1768.

Yasho Brahma Shah

The Gorkha Kingdom was established by Prince Dravya Shah, second son of King Yasho Brahma Shah of Lamjung Kingdom, on 1559 CE replacing the Khandka chiefs.
His youngest son Dravya Shah was the first Shah king of the Kingdom of Gorkha in 1559.

Nepal Mandala

Nepal Mandal
Among their conquests, the most important and valuable acquisition was the wealthy Newar confederacy of Nepal Mandala centered in the Kathmandu Valley.
The rule of the indigenous Newars in Nepal Mandala ended with its conquest by the Gorkha Kingdom and the rise of the Shah dynasty in 1768.

Bahadur Shah of Nepal

Bahadur ShahPrince Bahadur Shah
From 1736, the Gorkhalis engaged in a campaign of expansion begun by King Nara Bhupal Shah, which was continued by his son, King Prithvi Narayan Shah and grandson Prince Bahadur Shah.
Shah took a hardline approach to unification offering one of the options to state kings and princes: accept Gorkha sovereignty while continuing to rule themselves or battle to the death.

Gorkha District

GorkhaGorka DistrictGorkhā District
The second son of Yasobramha, Dravya Shah conquered the Ghale people of neighbouring Ligligkot, now in Gorkha.
Gorkha Kingdom: About 1700 steps leads you to the top of the hill at an altitude of 3281 ft. where Newar fashioned Gorkha Palace stands firm along with forts and temple boasting on its rich History. It is at 40–50 minutes of Walking Distance far from Gorkha Bazaar. One can view Manaslu(the 8th Highest Mountain of the World), Dhaulagiri and Ganesh Mountains from the Palace Complex.

Kathmandu

Kathmandu, NepalKatmanduKantipur
The three Newar capitals of Kathmandu, Lalitpur and Bhaktapur fell to the Gorkhalis between 1768 and 1769.
The Gorkha Kingdom ended the Malla confederation after the Battle of Kathmandu in 1768.

Tashi Lhunpo Monastery

TashilhunpoTashi LhunpoTashilhunpo Monastery
When the Tibetans stopped paying it, the Gorkhalis invaded Tibet again in 1791 and plundered the Tashilhunpo Monastery in Shigatse.
The monastery was sacked when the Gorkha Kingdom invaded Tibet and captured Shigatse in 1791 before a combined Tibetan and Chinese army drove them back as far as the outskirts of Kathmandu, when they were forced to agree to keep the peace in the future, pay tribute every five years, and return what they had looted from Tashi Lhunpo.

Kathmandu Valley

KathmanduValleyBhaktapur district
Among their conquests, the most important and valuable acquisition was the wealthy Newar confederacy of Nepal Mandala centered in the Kathmandu Valley.
The Mallas ruled the Kathmandu Valley and the surrounding area from the 12th until the 18th century CE, when the Shah dynasty of the Gorkha Kingdom under Prithvi Narayan Shah conquered the valley as he created present-day Nepal.

Lalitpur, Nepal

LalitpurPatanLalitpur (Patan)
The three Newar capitals of Kathmandu, Lalitpur and Bhaktapur fell to the Gorkhalis between 1768 and 1769.
In 1768, Lalitpur was annexed to the Gorkha Kingdom by Prithvi Narayan Shah without any battle.

Anglo-Nepalese War

Anglo-GorkhaNepalNepal Campaign
They were made to return much of the occupied territories after their defeat in the Anglo-Nepalese War (1814–1816).
The Shah era of Nepal began with the Gorkha king Prithvi Narayan Shah invading Kathmandu valley, which consisted of the capital of the Malla confederacy.

Gurkha

GorkhaGorkhaliGorkhas
Not to be confused with the inhabitants of the old Gorkha Kingdom only, the Gurkhas are also military units in the British or the Indian army (where they are known as Gorkhas) enlisted in Nepal and India.
Historically, the terms "Gurkha" and "Gorkhali" were synonymous with "Nepali", which originates from the hill principality Gorkha Kingdom, from which the Kingdom of Nepal expanded under Prithivi Narayan Shah.

Kukri

khukurikhukrikukri knife
This time the Chinese army came to Tibet's defence and advanced close to Kathmandu but couldn't achieve success due to strong counterattack with Khukuri.
The kukri came to be known to the Western world when the East India Company came into conflict with the growing Gorkha Kingdom, culminating in the Gurkha War of 1814–1816.

Sikkim

Sikkim, Indiaaccession of the state of SikkimGeology of Sikkim
The Gorkha dominion reached its height at the beginning of the 19th century, extending all along the Himalayan foothills from Kumaon and Garhwal in the west to Sikkim in the east.
In 1791, China sent troops to support Sikkim and defend Tibet against the Gorkha Kingdom.

Nepalese Army

Nepal ArmyRoyal Nepalese ArmyGorkhali Army
During World War II (1939–45), a total of 250,280 Gurkhas served in 40 battalions, plus eight Nepalese Army battalions, plus parachute, training, garrison, and porter units.
Since the British had fought against then RNA, which was till that time, still colloquially known as "Army of Gorkha" or "Gorkhali" army, the British called their new soldiers "Gurkhas".

Kingdom of Nepal

NepalKing of Nepalkingdom
Kingdom of Gorkha
Founded by King Prithvi Narayan Shah, a Gorkhali monarch of Rajput origin from medieval India, it existed for 240 years until the abolition of the Nepalese monarchy in 2008.

Shah dynasty

Nepalese Royal FamilyHouse of ShahShah
Shah dynasty
Shah dynasty was the ruling Chaubise Thakuri dynasty from the Indian subcontinent; they claimed Rajput origin from medieval India, and derived from the Gorkha Kingdom from 1559 to 1768 and later the unified Kingdom of Nepal from 1768 to 28 May 2008.

Battle of Kathmandu

conquest of Kathmandu
Battle of Kathmandu
It was fought in Kathmandu in 1768, and resulted in the defeat of its king Jaya Prakash Malla by Prithvi Narayan Shah, king of the adjoining Gorkha Kingdom.

Nepali language

NepaliNepaleseKhas
Similarly, the Gorkhali language was renamed as Nepali in 1933.
Historically, the language was called Khas Speech (Khas Kurā) and Gorkhali (language of the Gorkha Kingdom) before the term Nepali was adopted.

Tibet under Qing rule

Qing rule of TibetTibetunder administrative rule
Later Nepalese–Tibetan War was fought from 1855 to 1856 in Tibet between the forces of the Tibetan government (Ganden Phodrang, then under administrative rule of the Qing dynasty) and the invading Nepalese army resulting victory of Nepal.
Problematic relations with Nepal led to Gorkha invasions of Tibet, sent by Bahadur Shah, the Regent of Nepal, in 1788 and again in 1791, when Shigatse was occupied and the great Tashilhunpo Monastery, the then seat of the Panchen Lamas, sacked and destroyed.

Ram Shah

King Rama Shah
Ram Shah (c.1606–1641) was the king of the Gorkha Kingdom in the Indian subcontinent, present-day Nepal.