Gospel of Luke

LukeLuke's GospelBook of LukeGospel according to LukeGospel of St. LukeThe Gospel of LukeLkSt. Luke's GospelGospel of St Lukegospel
The Gospel According to Luke, also called the Gospel of Luke, or simply Luke, is the third of the four canonical Gospels.wikipedia
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Nativity of Jesus

Nativitybirth of JesusNativity of Christ
It tells of the origins, birth, ministry, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ.
The nativity of Jesus, nativity of Christ, birth of Christ or birth of Jesus is described in the gospels of Luke and Matthew.

Gospel

Gospelscanonical gospelsFour Gospels
The Gospel According to Luke, also called the Gospel of Luke, or simply Luke, is the third of the four canonical Gospels.
The four canonical gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, were probably written between AD 66 and 110.

Ministry of Jesus

ministryJesus' ministryhis ministry
It tells of the origins, birth, ministry, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ. It divides the history of first-century Christianity into three stages, with the gospel making up the first two of these – the arrival among men of Jesus the Messiah, from his birth to the beginning of his earthly mission in the meeting with John the Baptist followed by his earthly ministry, Passion, death, and resurrection (concluding the gospel story per se).
The Gospel of Luke states that Jesus was "about 30 years of age" at the start of his ministry.

Acts of the Apostles

ActsBook of ActsActs of Apostles
Luke is the longest of the four gospels and the longest book in the New Testament; together with Acts of the Apostles it makes up a two-volume work from the same author, called Luke–Acts.
Acts and the Gospel of Luke make up a two-part work, Luke–Acts, by the same anonymous author, usually dated to around 80–90 AD.

Luke–Acts

Luke-Actsa single unified worka two-part work
Luke is the longest of the four gospels and the longest book in the New Testament; together with Acts of the Apostles it makes up a two-volume work from the same author, called Luke–Acts.
Luke–Acts is the composite work of the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles in the New Testament.

Crucifixion of Jesus

CrucifixiondeathCrucifixion of Christ
It tells of the origins, birth, ministry, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ.
The Gospel of Luke's unique contributions to the narrative include Jesus' words to the women who were mourning, one criminal's rebuke of the other, the reaction of the multitudes who left "beating their breasts", and the women preparing spices and ointments before resting on the Sabbath.

Jesus

Jesus ChristChristJesus of Nazareth
It tells of the origins, birth, ministry, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ.
The four canonical gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) are the foremost sources for the life and message of Jesus.

John the Baptist

St. John the BaptistSaint John the BaptistSt John the Baptist
It divides the history of first-century Christianity into three stages, with the gospel making up the first two of these – the arrival among men of Jesus the Messiah, from his birth to the beginning of his earthly mission in the meeting with John the Baptist followed by his earthly ministry, Passion, death, and resurrection (concluding the gospel story per se).
The Synoptic Gospels (Mark, Matthew and Luke) describe John baptising Jesus; in the Gospel of John this is implied in.

Resurrection of Jesus

resurrectionResurrection of Christresurrection of Jesus Christ
It tells of the origins, birth, ministry, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ.
In the Gospel of Luke, "the woman who had come with him from Galilee" come to his tomb, which they find empty.

Ascension of Jesus

AscensionAscension DayAscension of Christ
It tells of the origins, birth, ministry, death, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ.
Luke chapter 24 tells how Jesus leads the eleven disciples to Bethany, a village on the Mount of Olives, where he instructs them to remain in Jerusalem until the coming of the Holy Spirit: "And it came to pass, while he blessed them, he parted from them, and was carried up into heaven. And they worshiped him, and returned to Jerusalem with great joy."

Passion of Jesus

PassionPassion of Christthe Passion
It divides the history of first-century Christianity into three stages, with the gospel making up the first two of these – the arrival among men of Jesus the Messiah, from his birth to the beginning of his earthly mission in the meeting with John the Baptist followed by his earthly ministry, Passion, death, and resurrection (concluding the gospel story per se).
Accounts of the Passion are found in the four canonical gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.

Q source

QQ documentQ hypothesis
The author of Luke used the Gospel of Mark as a source for the narrative of Christ's earthly life, and likely used a hypothetical sayings collection called the Q source for Jesus' teachings.
Q is part of the common material found in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke but not in the Gospel of Mark.

Luke the Evangelist

LukeSaint LukeSt. Luke
According to Church tradition this was Luke the Evangelist, the companion of Paul, but while this view is still occasionally put forward the scholarly consensus emphasises the many contradictions between Acts and the authentic Pauline letters.
The Early Church Fathers ascribed to him authorship of both the Gospel of Luke and the Acts of the Apostles, which would mean Luke contributed over a quarter of the text of the New Testament, more than any other author.

Christianity in the 1st century

Apostolic AgeApostolic Era1st century
It divides the history of first-century Christianity into three stages, with the gospel making up the first two of these – the arrival among men of Jesus the Messiah, from his birth to the beginning of his earthly mission in the meeting with John the Baptist followed by his earthly ministry, Passion, death, and resurrection (concluding the gospel story per se).
The Gospel of Luke states that Jesus was "about 30 years of age" at the start of his ministry.

L Source

LL (for Luke) source
Luke also contains material found in no other gospels, often referred to as the L (for Luke) source.
In historical-critical analysis, the L source is an inferred oral tradition which Luke used when composing his gospel.

Gospel of Mark

MarkMark's GospelGospel according to Mark
The author of Luke used the Gospel of Mark as a source for the narrative of Christ's earthly life, and likely used a hypothetical sayings collection called the Q source for Jesus' teachings.
It was only in the 19th century that Mark came to be seen as the earliest of the four gospels, and as a source used by both Matthew and Luke.

New Testament

NewThe New TestamentNew Testaments
Together they account for 27.5% of the New Testament, the largest contribution by a single author, providing the framework for both the Church's liturgical calendar and the historical outline into which later generations have fitted their idea of the story of Jesus.
Thus, in almost all Christian traditions today, the New Testament consists of 27 books: the four canonical gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John), the Acts of the Apostles, the fourteen epistles of Paul, the seven catholic epistles, and the Book of Revelation.

Codex Bezae

DBezaeCodex Bezae Cantabrigiensis
The oldest complete texts are the 4th century Codex Sinaiticus and Vaticanus, both from the Alexandrian family; Codex Bezae, a 5th- or 6th-century Western text-type manuscript that contains Luke in Greek and Latin versions on facing pages, appears to have descended from an offshoot of the main manuscript tradition, departing from more familiar readings at many points.
The manuscript presents the gospels in the Western order Matthew, John, Luke and Mark, of which only Luke is complete; after some missing pages the manuscript picks up with the Third Epistle of John (in Latin) and contains part of Acts.

Luke 1

LukeLuke 1:3Lk 1
He begins his gospel with a preface addressed to "Theophilus" (Luke 1:3; cf. Acts 1:1): the name means "Lover of God," and could mean any Christian though most interpreters consider it a reference to a Christian convert and Luke's literary patron.
Luke 1 is the first chapter of the Gospel of Luke in the New Testament of the Christian Bible.

Codex Sinaiticus

SinaiticusאSinaiticus* ,2
The oldest complete texts are the 4th century Codex Sinaiticus and Vaticanus, both from the Alexandrian family; Codex Bezae, a 5th- or 6th-century Western text-type manuscript that contains Luke in Greek and Latin versions on facing pages, appears to have descended from an offshoot of the main manuscript tradition, departing from more familiar readings at many points.

Acts 1

Acts 1:8Acts 1:1Chapter 1
He begins his gospel with a preface addressed to "Theophilus" (Luke 1:3; cf. Acts 1:1): the name means "Lover of God," and could mean any Christian though most interpreters consider it a reference to a Christian convert and Luke's literary patron.
The book containing this chapter is anonymous but early Christian tradition affirmed that Luke composed this book as well as the Gospel of Luke.

Luke 2

chapter 22Lk 2
For example, according to Luke 2:11 Jesus was the Christ at his birth, but in he becomes Christ at the resurrection, while in Acts 3:20 it seems his messiahship is active only at the parousia, the "second coming"; similarly, in Luke 2:11 he is the Saviour from birth, but in he is made Saviour at the resurrection; and he is born the Son of God in, but becomes the Son of God at the resurrection according to.
Luke 2 is the second chapter of the Gospel of Luke in the New Testament.

Western text-type

WesternWestern textearly Western Christian writing
The oldest complete texts are the 4th century Codex Sinaiticus and Vaticanus, both from the Alexandrian family; Codex Bezae, a 5th- or 6th-century Western text-type manuscript that contains Luke in Greek and Latin versions on facing pages, appears to have descended from an offshoot of the main manuscript tradition, departing from more familiar readings at many points.
In distinction from both Alexandrian and Byzantine texts, the Western text-type consistently omits a series of eight short phrases from verses in the Gospel of Luke; the so-called Western non-interpolations.

Martha

Saint MarthaMartha of BethanySt. Martha
Martha of Bethany (Aramaic: מַרְתָּא Martâ) is a biblical figure described in the Gospels of Luke and John.

Rich man and Lazarus

LazarusLazarus and DivesDives and Lazarus
The parable of the rich man and Lazarus (also called the Dives and Lazarus or Lazarus and Dives) is a well-known parable of Jesus appearing in the Gospel of Luke.