Gospel of Mark

MarkMark's GospelGospel according to MarkBook of MarkThe Gospel of MarkgospelGospel of St. MarkGospel of Saint MarkMkSt. Mark
The Gospel According to Mark is one of the four canonical gospels and one of the three synoptic gospels.wikipedia
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Gospel

Gospelscanonical gospelsFour Gospels
The Gospel According to Mark is one of the four canonical gospels and one of the three synoptic gospels.
The four canonical gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, were probably written between AD 66 and 110.

Synoptic Gospels

synoptic problemSynoptic GospelSynoptics
The Gospel According to Mark is one of the four canonical gospels and one of the three synoptic gospels.
The gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke are referred to as the synoptic Gospels because they include many of the same stories, often in a similar sequence and in similar or sometimes identical wording.

Baptism of Jesus

baptismBaptism of Christhis baptism
It tells of the ministry of Jesus from his baptism by John the Baptist to his death and burial and the discovery of the empty tomb – there is no genealogy of Jesus or birth narrative, nor, in the original ending at chapter 16, any post-resurrection appearances of Jesus.
The baptism of Jesus is described in the gospels of Matthew, Mark and Luke.

Mark 16

Longer ending of MarkMark 16:8Mark 16:8-20
It tells of the ministry of Jesus from his baptism by John the Baptist to his death and burial and the discovery of the empty tomb – there is no genealogy of Jesus or birth narrative, nor, in the original ending at chapter 16, any post-resurrection appearances of Jesus.
Mark 16 is the final chapter of the Gospel of Mark in the New Testament of the Christian Bible.

John the Baptist

St. John the BaptistSaint John the BaptistSt John the Baptist
It tells of the ministry of Jesus from his baptism by John the Baptist to his death and burial and the discovery of the empty tomb – there is no genealogy of Jesus or birth narrative, nor, in the original ending at chapter 16, any post-resurrection appearances of Jesus.
The Synoptic Gospels (Mark, Matthew and Luke) describe John baptising Jesus; in the Gospel of John this is implied in.

Empty tomb

Garden of the Empty Tombtombburied
It tells of the ministry of Jesus from his baptism by John the Baptist to his death and burial and the discovery of the empty tomb – there is no genealogy of Jesus or birth narrative, nor, in the original ending at chapter 16, any post-resurrection appearances of Jesus.

Saint Peter

PeterSt. PeterSt Peter
Most scholars reject the tradition which ascribes it to John Mark, the companion of the apostle Peter, and regard it (and the other gospels) as anonymous, the work of an unknown author working with various sources including collections of miracle stories, controversy stories, parables, and a passion narrative.
The Gospel of Mark was traditionally thought to show the influence of Peter's preaching and eyewitness memories.

Marcan priority

Markan priorityearliest of the gospelsearliest version
The hypothesis of Marcan priority (that Mark was written first) continues to be held by the majority of scholars today, and there is a new recognition of the author as an artist and theologian using a range of literary devices to convey his conception of Jesus as the authoritative yet suffering Son of God.
Marcan priority, the hypothesis that the Gospel of Mark was the first-written of the three Synoptic Gospels and was used as a source by the other two (Matthew and Luke) is a central element in discussion of the synoptic problem – the question of the documentary relationship among these three Gospels.

Post-Resurrection appearances of Jesus

Resurrection appearances of Jesusresurrectionappearance of Jesus
It tells of the ministry of Jesus from his baptism by John the Baptist to his death and burial and the discovery of the empty tomb – there is no genealogy of Jesus or birth narrative, nor, in the original ending at chapter 16, any post-resurrection appearances of Jesus.
The gospel of Mark (written c.70 CE) contained no post-Resurrection appearances in its original version, which ended at Mark 16:8, although Mark 16:7, in which the young man discovered in the tomb instructs the women to tell "the disciples and Peter" that Jesus will see them again in Galilee, hints that the author may have known of the tradition of 1 Thessalonians.

Gospel of Matthew

MatthewMatthew's GospelGospel according to Matthew
Mark was traditionally placed second, and sometimes fourth, in the Christian canon, as an inferior abridgement of what was regarded as the most important gospel, Matthew.
Writing in a polished Semitic "synagogue Greek", he drew on the Gospel of Mark as a source, plus a collection of sayings known as the Q source (although the existence of Q has been questioned by some scholars), and material unique to his own community, called the M source or "Special Matthew".

Resurrection of Jesus

resurrectionResurrection of Christresurrection of Jesus Christ
The gospel ends, in its original version, with the discovery of the empty tomb, a promise to meet again in Galilee, and an unheeded instruction to spread the good news of the resurrection.
The Gospel of Mark, written c. 65–75, ends with the discovery of the empty tomb by Mary Magdalene, Mary the mother of James, and Salome.

Gospel of John

JohnJohn's GospelFourth Gospel
The Church has consequently derived its view of Jesus primarily from Matthew, secondarily from John, and only distantly from Mark.
The scholarly consensus in the second half of the 20th century was that John was independent of the synoptic gospels (Matthew, Mark, and Luke), but this agreement broke down in the last decade of the century and there are now many who believe that John did know some version of Mark and possibly Luke, as he shares with them some items of vocabulary and clusters of incidents arranged in the same order.

Q source

QQ documentQ hypothesis
The author used a variety of pre-existing sources, such as conflict stories (Mark 2:1–3:6), apocalyptic discourse (13:1–37), and collections of sayings (although not the Gospel of Thomas and probably not the Q source).
Q is part of the common material found in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke but not in the Gospel of Mark.

Gospel of Luke

LukeLuke's GospelBook of Luke
It was only in the 19th century that Mark came to be seen as the earliest of the four gospels, and as a source used by both Matthew and Luke.
The author of Luke used the Gospel of Mark as a source for the narrative of Christ's earthly life, and likely used a hypothetical sayings collection called the Q source for Jesus' teachings.

Messianic Secret

nor tell anyone in the townsecret
Jesus is also the Son of God, but he keeps his identity secret (the Messianic Secret), concealing it in parables so that even most of the disciples fail to understand. This conclusion was shaken by two works published in the early decades of the 20th century: in 1901 William Wrede argued strongly that the "Messianic secret" motif in Mark was a creation of the early church rather than a reflection of the historical Jesus; and in 1919 Karl Ludwig Schmidt showed how the links between the episodes are the invention of the writer, thus undermining the claim that the gospel is a reliable guide to the chronology of Jesus' mission.
In biblical criticism, the Messianic Secret refers to a motif primarily in the Gospel of Mark in which Jesus is portrayed as commanding his followers to maintain silence about his Messianic mission.

Passion of Jesus

PassionPassion of Christthe Passion
More fundamentally, some scholars believe Mark's reason for writing was to counter believers who saw Jesus in a Greek way, as wonder-worker (the Greek term is "divine man"); Mark saw the suffering of the messiah as essential, so that the "Son of God" title (the Hellenistic "divine man") had to be corrected and amplified with the "Son of Man" title, which conveyed Christ's suffering.
Accounts of the Passion are found in the four canonical gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.

Judas Iscariot

JudasIscariotJudases
The Gospel of Mark, the earliest gospel, gives no motive for Judas's betrayal, but does present Jesus predicting it at the Last Supper, an event also described in all the later gospels.

William Wrede

Wilhelm Wrede
This conclusion was shaken by two works published in the early decades of the 20th century: in 1901 William Wrede argued strongly that the "Messianic secret" motif in Mark was a creation of the early church rather than a reflection of the historical Jesus; and in 1919 Karl Ludwig Schmidt showed how the links between the episodes are the invention of the writer, thus undermining the claim that the gospel is a reliable guide to the chronology of Jesus' mission.
He became famous for his investigation of the Messianic Secret theme in the Gospel of Mark.

Pontius Pilate

PilatePontius PilatusPilates
94 CE) by the Jewish historian Josephus, as well as the four canonical Christian Gospels, Mark (composed between 66 and 70 CE), Luke (composed between 85 and 90 CE), Matthew (composed between 85 and 90 CE), and John (composed between 90 and 110 CE).

Gethsemane

Garden of GethsemaneGardens of GethsemaneAgony
Gethsemane appears in the Greek original of the Gospel of Matthew and the Gospel of Mark as Γεθσημανή (Gethsēmanḗ).

Rejection of Jesus

Jews rejected itCursing Chorazin, Bethsaida, and Capernaumhometown rejection
In the sixth chapter of the Gospel of Mark there is an account of a visit by Jesus to his hometown with his followers.

Sayings of Jesus on the cross

Seven Last WordsSeven Last Words from the CrossSeven Last Words of Christ
Mark's Christ dies with the cry, "My God, my God, why have you forsaken me?"; Matthew, the next gospel to be written, repeats this word for word but manages to make clear that Jesus's death is the beginning of the resurrection of Israel; Luke has a still more positive picture, replacing Mark's (and Matthew's) cry of despair with one of submission to God's will ("Father, into your hands I commend my spirit"); while John, the last gospel, has Jesus dying without apparent suffering in fulfillment of the divine plan.
One other saying appears both in the Gospel of Matthew and the Gospel of Mark, and another is only directly quoted in John but alluded to in Matthew and Mark.

Acts of the Apostles

ActsBook of ActsActs of Apostles
By and large the sources for Acts can only be guessed at, but the author would have had access to the Septuagint (a Greek translation of the Jewish scriptures), the Gospel of Mark, and either the hypothetical collection of "sayings of Jesus" called the Q source or the Gospel of Matthew.

Secret Gospel of Mark

The Secret Gospel of Mark
The Secret Gospel of Mark or the Mystic Gospel of Mark (Greek: τοῦ Μάρκου τὸ μυστικὸν εὐαγγέλιον, tou Markou to mystikon euangelion), also the Longer Gospel of Mark, is a putative longer and secret or mystic version of the Gospel of Mark.

Holy Spirit

SpiritHoly Ghostthe Holy Spirit
Each depiction of the Holy Spirit arose from different historical accounts in the Gospel narratives; the first being at the baptism of Jesus in the Jordan River where the Holy Spirit was said to descend in the form of a dove as the voice of God the Father spoke as described in Matthew, Mark, and Luke; the second being from the day of Pentecost, fifty days after Pascha where the descent of the Holy Spirit came upon the Apostles and other followers of Jesus Christ, as tongues of fire as described in the Acts of the Apostles.