Gouverneur Morris

Gouvernor MorrisGouveneur Morrisauthor
Gouverneur Morris (30 January 1752 – 6 November 1816) was an American statesman, a Founding Father of the United States, and a signatory to the Articles of Confederation and the United States Constitution.wikipedia
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Preamble to the United States Constitution

We The PeoplePreamblemore perfect union
He wrote the Preamble to the United States Constitution and has been called the "Penman of the Constitution."
The Preamble was placed in the Constitution during the last days of the Constitutional Convention by the Committee on Style, which wrote its final draft, with Gouverneur Morris leading the effort.

Constitution of the United States

United States ConstitutionU.S. ConstitutionConstitution
Gouverneur Morris (30 January 1752 – 6 November 1816) was an American statesman, a Founding Father of the United States, and a signatory to the Articles of Confederation and the United States Constitution.
Toward the close of these discussions, on September 8, a "Committee of Style and Arrangement" – Alexander Hamilton (New York), William Samuel Johnson (Connecticut), Rufus King (Massachusetts), James Madison (Virginia), and Gouverneur Morris (Pennsylvania) – was appointed to distill a final draft constitution from the twenty-three approved articles.

Founding Fathers of the United States

Founding FathersFounding FatherFounding Father of the United States
Gouverneur Morris (30 January 1752 – 6 November 1816) was an American statesman, a Founding Father of the United States, and a signatory to the Articles of Confederation and the United States Constitution.
Many of the Founding Fathers were under 40 years old at the time of the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776: Alexander Hamilton was 19, Aaron Burr was 20, Gouverneur Morris was 24.

Columbia College (New York)

Columbia CollegeColumbia College of Columbia UniversityColumbia College, Columbia University
After attending Columbia College, he studied law under Judge William Smith and earned admission to the bar.
Even at this young age, King's College had already educated Alexander Hamilton, who served as military aide to General George Washington, initiated and authored most of The Federalist Papers, and then as the first Secretary of the Treasury; John Jay, author of several of the Federalist Papers and the first Chief Justice of the United States; Robert Livingston, one of the Committee of Five who drafted the Declaration of Independence; and Gouverneur Morris, who authored most of the United States Constitution.

List of ambassadors of the United States to France

United States Ambassador to FranceU.S. Minister to FranceU.S. Ambassador to France
After the ratification of the Constitution, Morris served as Minister Plenipotentiary to France.

Superintendent of Finance of the United States

Superintendent of FinanceAgent of MarineFinance
After losing re-election to Congress, he moved to Philadelphia and became the assistant U.S. superintendent of finance. In Philadelphia, he was appointed assistant superintendent of finance of the United States, serving under Robert Morris.
The only person to hold the office was Robert Morris, who served from 1781 to 1784, with the assistance of Gouverneur Morris.

Erie Canal Commission

Canal CommissionerCanal CommissionersCanal Board
After leaving the Senate, he served as chairman of the Erie Canal Commission.
On March 15, the State Legislature appointed Federalists Gouverneur Morris, Stephen Van Rensselaer, William North and Thomas Eddy, and Democratic-Republicans DeWitt Clinton, Simeon DeWitt and Peter Buell Porter a commission to explore a route for a canal to Lake Erie, and report.

Lewis Morris

Lewis Morris Jr.Morris, Lewis
Morris' half-brother Lewis Morris was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.
Morris' father had seven children, including his siblings, Staats Long Morris (1728–1800) and Richard Morris (1730–1810), and his half-siblings, Mary Lawrence, Gouverneur Morris (1752–1816), Isabella, and Catherine.

William M. Meredith

William MeredithMeredith
His grandnephew was William M. Meredith, United States Secretary of the Treasury under Zachary Taylor.
Gertrude was the niece of Lewis Morris, as well as of Gouverneur Morris, and highly educated and respected in her own right, as well as published in Dennie's Port Folio.

Staats Long Morris

Another half-brother, Staats Long Morris, was a loyalist and major-general in the British army during the American Revolution, and his grandfather, Lewis Morris, was the chief justice of New York and British governor of New Jersey.
He was the grandson of Lewis Morris (the first governor of New Jersey), the brother of Lewis Morris (a signer of the Declaration of Independence), and the half-brother of Gouverneur Morris (an author of the United States Constitution).

Lewis R. Morris

Lewis Richard MorrisLewisLewis Morris
His nephew, Lewis Richard Morris, served in the Vermont legislature and in the United States Congress.
Morris was a nephew of Gouverneur Morris and Lewis Morris.

Articles of Confederation

Articles of Confederation and Perpetual UnionConfederationArticles
Gouverneur Morris (30 January 1752 – 6 November 1816) was an American statesman, a Founding Father of the United States, and a signatory to the Articles of Confederation and the United States Constitution.

New York Provincial Congress

New York Provincial AssemblyProvincial CongressProvincial Convention
He was elected to the New York Provincial Congress before serving in the Continental Congress.

Valley Forge

Battle of Valley Forgewinter encampmentContinental Army's 1777-78 winter encampment
After witnessing the army encamped at Valley Forge, he was so appalled by the conditions of the troops that he became the spokesman for the Continental Army in congress and subsequently helped enact substantial reforms in its training, methods, and financing.
The delegates consisted of "Francis Dana of Massachusetts, Nathaniel Folsom of New Hampshire, John Harvie of Virginia, Gouverneur Morris of New York, and Joseph Reed of Pennsylvania."

Constitutional Convention (United States)

Constitutional ConventionPhiladelphia ConventionConstitutional Convention of 1787
He represented Pennsylvania at the 1787 Constitutional Convention, where he advocated a strong central government.
On May 30, the Convention agreed, at the request of Gouverneur Morris, "that a national government ought to be established consisting of a supreme Legislative, Executive and Judiciary".

Erie Canal

Eriecanalcanals
The Erie Canal helped to transform New York City into a financial capital, the possibilities of which were apparent to Morris when he said "the proudest empire in Europe is but a bubble compared to what America will be, must be, in the course of two centuries, perhaps of one."
Gouverneur Morris and Elkanah Watson were early proponents of a canal along the Mohawk River.

Robert Morris (financier)

Robert MorrisMorrisMr. Morris
In Philadelphia, he was appointed assistant superintendent of finance of the United States, serving under Robert Morris.
He formed a close working relationship with Gouverneur Morris (no relation), a young New York congressman who shared many of Robert Morris's views.

1803 United States Senate election in New York

1803run for U.S. Senatorelected
He served from May 3, 1800 to March 3, 1803 and was defeated for re-election in February 1803.
Gouverneur Morris had been elected in 1800 to complete the term (1797-1803) after Philip Schuyler (1797-98), John Sloss Hobart (1798), William North (1798) and James Watson (1798-1800) had occupied the seat.

Lewis Morris (governor)

Lewis MorrisGovernor Lewis MorrisJudge Lewis Morris
Another half-brother, Staats Long Morris, was a loyalist and major-general in the British army during the American Revolution, and his grandfather, Lewis Morris, was the chief justice of New York and British governor of New Jersey.
Through his children, he was the grandfather of many prominent Americans, including Lewis Morris (1726–1798), a signer of the Declaration of Independence; Gen. Staats Long Morris (1728–1800); New York Chief Justice Richard Morris; New Jersey Chief Justice Robert Morris (1745-1815); and U.S. Senator and Founding Father Gouverneur Morris (1752–1816).

Gouverneur Morris (novelist)

Gouverneur MorrisGouverneur Morris IVGouveneur Morris
Morris' great-grandson, also named Gouverneur Morris (1876–1953), was an author of pulp novels and short stories during the early twentieth century.
Gouverneur Morris IV was born in 1876 and was a great grandson of American Founding Father Gouverneur Morris.

Adelaide Filleul, Marquise de Souza-Botelho

Adelaide FilleulAdelaïde FilleulAdélaïde Filleul
His lovers included the French novelist Adelaide Filleul and the American poet and novelist Sarah Wentworth Apthorp Morton.
There are many allusions to their liaison in the diary of Gouverneur Morris, who was another of her lovers.

Thomas Paine

Tom PainePainePaine, Thomas
While Morris was minister, Marquis de Lafayette, who had been an important participant in the American Revolution, was exiled from France and his family imprisoned, and Thomas Paine, another important figure, was arrested and imprisoned in France.
However, Gouverneur Morris, the American minister to France, did not press his claim, and Paine later wrote that Morris had connived at his imprisonment.

Gouverneur, New York

GouverneurGouverneur, NYTown of Gouverneur
Morris established himself as an important landowner in northern New York, where the Town of Gouverneur and Village of Gouverneur in St. Lawrence County are named after him.
The town is named after statesman and landowner Gouverneur Morris.

Thomas Mann Randolph Jr.

Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr.Thomas M. RandolphThomas Mann Randolph
In 1809, at age 57, he married 35-year-old Anne (or Ann) Cary ("Nancy") Randolph (1774–1837), who was the daughter of Ann Cary and Thomas Mann Randolph Sr., and the sister of Thomas Mann Randolph Jr. Thomas Mann Randolph Jr. was the husband of Thomas Jefferson's daughter, Martha Jefferson Randolph.
His siblings included older sisters: Mary Randolph (1762–1828), author of The Virginia House-Wife (1824); Cary ("Nancy") Randolph (1774–1837) wife of Gouverneur Morris, and younger sister, Virginia Randolph Cary (1786–1852), author of Letters on Female Character (1828).

Gouverneur (village), New York

GouverneurGouverneur, New YorkGouverneur village
Morris established himself as an important landowner in northern New York, where the Town of Gouverneur and Village of Gouverneur in St. Lawrence County are named after him.
The village is named after Gouverneur Morris, one of the authors of the Constitution of the United States, as well as a prominent landowner and part-time resident of the area.