Government of the United Kingdom

British GovernmentUK GovernmentGovernmentHer Majesty's GovernmentUnited Kingdom GovernmentHM GovernmentBritishWhitehallcentral governmentUnited Kingdom
The Government of the United Kingdom, formally referred to as Her Majesty's Government, is the central government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.wikipedia
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Cabinet of the United Kingdom

CabinetBritish Cabinetcabinet minister
The prime minister and the other most senior ministers belong to the supreme decision-making committee, known as the Cabinet.
The Cabinet of the United Kingdom is the collective decision-making body of Her Majesty's Government of the United Kingdom, composed of the Prime Minister and 22 cabinet ministers, the most senior of the government ministers.

Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

Prime MinisterBritish Prime MinisterPrime Minister of Great Britain
The government is led by the Prime Minister, who selects all the remaining ministers.
The Prime Minister is the head of the United Kingdom government.

2017 United Kingdom general election

2017 general election20172017 UK general election
The government is dependent on Parliament to make primary legislation, and since the Fixed-terms Parliaments Act 2011, general elections are held every five years to elect a new House of Commons, unless there is a successful vote of no confidence in the government or a two-thirds vote for a snap election (as was the case in 2017) in the House of Commons, in which case an election may be held sooner. He is the leader of the Conservative Party, which won the most seats in the House of Commons but did not secure a majority government in the general election on 8 June 2017, when Theresa May was the party leader.
If one party obtains a majority of seats, then that party is entitled to form the Government, with its leader as Prime Minister.

Constitution of the United Kingdom

British constitutionconstitutionEnglish constitution
Under the uncodified British constitution, executive authority lies with the monarch, although this authority is exercised only by, or on the advice of, the prime minister and the cabinet.
The Prime Minister appoints a cabinet of people who lead each department, and form Her Majesty's Government.

Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster

Shadow Chancellor of the Duchy of LancasterChancellorChancellor of the Duchy
In most cases they also exercise power directly as leaders of the Government Departments, though some Cabinet positions are sinecures to a greater or lesser degree (for instance Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster or Lord Privy Seal).
The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster is a ministerial office in the Government of the United Kingdom that includes as part of its duties the administration of the estates and rents of the Duchy of Lancaster.

Parliament of the United Kingdom

ParliamentUK ParliamentBritish Parliament
The government ministers all sit in Parliament, and are accountable to it.
In practice these are always exercised by the monarch on the advice of the Prime Minister and the other ministers of HM Government.

Monarchy of the United Kingdom

MonarchBritish monarchQueen of the United Kingdom
After an election, the monarch (currently Queen Elizabeth II) selects as prime minister the leader of the party most likely to command the confidence of the House of Commons, usually by possessing a majority of MPs.

Andrew Adonis, Baron Adonis

Andrew AdonisLord AdonisThe Lord Adonis
There have been some recent exceptions to this: for example, cabinet ministers Lord Mandelson (First Secretary of State) and Lord Adonis (Secretary of State for Transport) sat in the Lords and were responsible to that House during the government of Gordon Brown.
Andrew Adonis, Baron Adonis, (born Andreas Adonis; 22 February 1963) is a British Labour Party politician and journalist who served in HM Government for five years in the Blair ministry and the Brown ministry.

Chancellor of the Exchequer

ChancellorSecond Lord of the TreasuryChancellors of the Exchequer
A similar convention applies to the Chancellor of the Exchequer.
The Chancellor and Under-Treasurer of Her Majesty's Exchequer, commonly known as the Chancellor of the Exchequer, or simply the Chancellor, is a senior official within the Government of the United Kingdom and head of Her Majesty's Treasury.

Welsh Government

Welsh Assembly Governmentdevolved governmentWelsh Ministers
The Government is occasionally referred to with the metonym Westminster, due to that being where many of the offices of the government are situated, especially by members in the Government of Scotland, the Welsh Government and the Northern Ireland Executive in order to differentiate it from their own.
Further transfers of executive functions from the British government can be made directly to the Welsh ministers (with their consent) by an Order in Council approved by the British parliament.

Elections in the United Kingdom

Englandregistered electorselections
The government is dependent on Parliament to make primary legislation, and since the Fixed-terms Parliaments Act 2011, general elections are held every five years to elect a new House of Commons, unless there is a successful vote of no confidence in the government or a two-thirds vote for a snap election (as was the case in 2017) in the House of Commons, in which case an election may be held sooner.
It is also possible for a general election to be triggered by a separate Act of Parliament which bypasses the Fixed terms Parliament Act 2011, this happened in October 2019 when the Government led by Boris Johnson after three failed attempts to trigger an election though an early parliamentary election motion which requires a two-thirds majority support of MPs instead passed the Early Parliamentary General Election Act 2019 which allows the holding of the December 2019 election which simply required a majority of MPs to support and received Royal Assent on the 31 October 2019.

Constitutional monarchy

constitutional monarchiesconstitutional monarchconstitutional
The United Kingdom is a constitutional monarchy in which the reigning monarch (that is, the king or queen who is the head of state at any given time) does not make any open political decisions.
Instead, the British Parliament and the Government – chiefly in the office of Prime Minister of the United Kingdom – exercise their powers under "Royal (or Crown) Prerogative": on behalf of the monarch and through powers still formally possessed by the Monarch.

Edward VII

King Edward VIIPrince of WalesEdward VII of the United Kingdom
Since the start of Edward VII's reign in 1901, the prime minister has always been an elected member of Parliament (MP) and therefore directly accountable to the House of Commons.
The British Government wanted Edward to secure the friendship of Egypt's ruler, Said Pasha, to prevent French control of the Suez Canal if the Ottoman Empire collapsed.

Fixed-term Parliaments Act 2011

Fixed-term Parliaments ActFixed-term Parliament ActFixed-term Parliaments Bill
The government is dependent on Parliament to make primary legislation, and since the Fixed-terms Parliaments Act 2011, general elections are held every five years to elect a new House of Commons, unless there is a successful vote of no confidence in the government or a two-thirds vote for a snap election (as was the case in 2017) in the House of Commons, in which case an election may be held sooner.
Jeremy Corbyn, the Leader of the Opposition, tabled a motion of no confidence in Her Majesty's Government on 15 January 2019, after the House of Commons rejected Theresa May's draft agreement on Brexit.

Home Secretary

Secretary of State for the Home DepartmentHome SecretariesBritish Home Secretary
Her Majesty's Principal Secretary of State for the Home Department, normally referred to as the Home Secretary, is head of the Home Office and a senior Cabinet minister in Her Majesty's Government.

Peter Mandelson

Lord MandelsonThe Lord MandelsonMandelson
There have been some recent exceptions to this: for example, cabinet ministers Lord Mandelson (First Secretary of State) and Lord Adonis (Secretary of State for Transport) sat in the Lords and were responsible to that House during the government of Gordon Brown.
On 24 January 2001 Mandelson resigned from the Government for a second time, following accusations of using his position to influence a passport application.

Northern Ireland Executive

ExecutiveNorthern Irelanddevolved Northern Ireland government
The Government is occasionally referred to with the metonym Westminster, due to that being where many of the offices of the government are situated, especially by members in the Government of Scotland, the Welsh Government and the Northern Ireland Executive in order to differentiate it from their own.
Ministers are also subject to several limitations, including the European Convention on Human Rights, European Union law, other international obligations of the UK, a requirement not to discriminate on religious or political grounds, and having no power over reserved and excepted matters (which are held by the United Kingdom Government).

Minister of the Crown

ministers of the Crownministerministers
Ministers of the Crown are responsible to the House in which they sit; they make statements in that House and take questions from members of that House.
As the English overseas possessions and later British Empire expanded, the colonial governments remained subordinate to the imperial government at Westminster, and thus the Crown was still ministered to only by the Imperial Privy Council, made up of British Ministers of the Crown.

Civil Service (United Kingdom)

Civil Servicecivil servantBritish Civil Service
As of 2019, there are around 120 government ministers supported by 560,000 Civil Servants and other staff working in the 25 Ministerial Departments and their executive agencies.
Her Majesty's Home Civil Service, also known as Her Majesty's Civil Service or the Home Civil Service, is the permanent bureaucracy or secretariat of Crown employees that supports Her Majesty's Government, which is composed of a cabinet of ministers chosen by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, as well as two of the three devolved administrations: the Scottish Government and the Welsh Government, but not the Northern Ireland Executive.

Theresa May

MayPrime Ministernew Prime Minister
He is the leader of the Conservative Party, which won the most seats in the House of Commons but did not secure a majority government in the general election on 8 June 2017, when Theresa May was the party leader.
On 4 December 2018, on a motion passed by MPs by 311 to 293 votes, the May Government was found in contempt of Parliament; the first government to be found in contempt in history.

British Government frontbench

ministersBritish Governmententered government
The government is led by the Prime Minister, who selects all the remaining ministers.

Executive agency

executive agenciesState AgenciesUnited Kingdom government agency
As of 2019, there are around 120 government ministers supported by 560,000 Civil Servants and other staff working in the 25 Ministerial Departments and their executive agencies.
An executive agency is a part of a government department that is treated as managerially and budgetarily separate, to carry out some part of the executive functions of the United Kingdom government, Scottish Government, Welsh Government or Northern Ireland Executive.

10 Downing Street

Downing StreetPrime Minister's OfficeNumber 10
The prime minister is based at 10 Downing Street in Westminster, London.
10 Downing Street, also known colloquially in the United Kingdom simply as Number 10, is (along with the adjoining Cabinet Office at 70 Whitehall) the headquarters of the Government of the United Kingdom and the official residence and office of the First Lord of the Treasury, a post which, for much of the 18th and 19th centuries and invariably since 1905, has been held by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

Privy Council of the United Kingdom

Privy CouncilPCPrivy Counsellor
The Cabinet members advise the monarch as members of the Privy Council.
The sovereign may appoint anyone a Privy Counsellor, but in practice appointments are made only on the advice of Her Majesty's Government.

Whitehall

Parliament StreetWhitehall PlaceWhitehall, London
Most government departments have their headquarters nearby in Whitehall.
The street is recognised as the centre of the Government of the United Kingdom and is lined with numerous departments and ministries, including the Ministry of Defence, Horse Guards and the Cabinet Office.