Governor-General of Australia

Governor-GeneralGovernor General of AustraliaGovernor GeneralAustralian Governor-Generalgovernors-generalGovernors-General of AustraliaGovernor-General of the Commonwealth of AustraliaAustraliagovernor-generalship of AustraliaGovernor–General
The Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia is the representative of the Australian monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II. As the Queen is concurrently the monarch of 15 other Commonwealth realms, and resides in the United Kingdom, she, on the advice of her prime minister, appoints a governor-general to carry out constitutional duties within the Commonwealth of Australia.wikipedia
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Monarchy of Australia

Queen of AustraliaMonarchKing of the British Dominions Beyond the Seas
The Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia is the representative of the Australian monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II.
She is represented in Australia as a whole by the Governor-General, in accordance with the Australian Constitution and letters patent from the Queen, and in each of the Australian states, according to the state constitutions, by a governor, assisted by a lieutenant-governor.

Prime Minister of Australia

Prime MinisterAustralian Prime MinisterPrime Ministers
As the Queen is concurrently the monarch of 15 other Commonwealth realms, and resides in the United Kingdom, she, on the advice of her prime minister, appoints a governor-general to carry out constitutional duties within the Commonwealth of Australia.
The individual who holds the office is commissioned by the governor-general of Australia and at the governor-general's pleasure subject to the Constitution of Australia and constitutional conventions.

Australian Defence Force

Australian militaryAustralian armed forcesAustralian
The governor-general has formal presidency over the Federal Executive Council and is commander-in-chief of the Australian Defence Force.
The Section states that "the command in chief of the naval and military forces of the Commonwealth is vested in the Governor-General as the Queen's representative".

Parliament of Australia

Australian ParliamentFederal ParliamentParliament
The functions of the governor-general include appointing ministers, judges, and ambassadors; giving royal assent to legislation passed by parliament; issuing writs for election; and bestowing Australian honours.
It consists of three elements: the Crown (represented by the Governor-General), the Senate and the House of Representatives.

Government House, Canberra

YarralumlaGovernment Houseofficial residence
The governor-general also has a ceremonial role: hosting events at either of the two official residences—Government House in the capital, Canberra, and Admiralty House in Sydney—and travelling throughout Australia to open conferences, attend services and commemorations, and generally provide encouragement to individuals and groups who are contributing to their communities.
Government House, commonly referred to as Yarralumla, is the official residence of the Governor-General of Australia.

Official Secretary to the Governor-General of Australia

Official SecretaryOfficial Secretary to the Governor-GeneralGovernor-General's official secretary
The governor-general is supported by a staff (of 80 in 2018 ) headed by the Official Secretary to the Governor-General of Australia.
The Official Secretary to the Governor-General of Australia and his staff provide governors-general with the necessary support to enable them to carry out their constitutional, statutory, ceremonial, and public duties.

David Hurley

David John HurleyGeneral David HurleyGeneral David Hurley, AC, DSC
Since 1 July 2019, the governor-general has been General David Hurley. Various Governors-General had previously served as governors of an Australian state or colony: Lord Hopetoun (Victoria 1889–1895); Lord Tennyson (South Australia 1899–1902); Lord Gowrie (South Australia 1928–34; and New South Wales 1935–1936); Major General Michael Jeffery (Western Australia 1993–2000); Dame Quentin Bryce (Queensland 2003–2008); General David Hurley (New South Wales 2014 - 2019).
General David John Hurley, (born 26 August 1953) is a former senior officer in the Australian Army who is the 27th Governor-General of Australia, in office since 1 July 2019.

Admiralty House, Sydney

Admiralty HouseAdmiralty House, KirribilliAdmiralty House, Lodge, Garden and Fortifications
The governor-general also has a ceremonial role: hosting events at either of the two official residences—Government House in the capital, Canberra, and Admiralty House in Sydney—and travelling throughout Australia to open conferences, attend services and commemorations, and generally provide encouragement to individuals and groups who are contributing to their communities.
Admiralty House is the Sydney official residence of the Governor-General of Australia.

Quentin Bryce

Dame Quentin Bryce(Dame) Quentin BryceBryce
Only one governor-general, Dame Quentin Bryce (2008–2014), has been a woman. Various Governors-General had previously served as governors of an Australian state or colony: Lord Hopetoun (Victoria 1889–1895); Lord Tennyson (South Australia 1899–1902); Lord Gowrie (South Australia 1928–34; and New South Wales 1935–1936); Major General Michael Jeffery (Western Australia 1993–2000); Dame Quentin Bryce (Queensland 2003–2008); General David Hurley (New South Wales 2014 - 2019).
Dame Quentin Alice Louise Bryce, (née Strachan; born 23 December 1942) is an Australian academic who served as the 25th Governor-General of Australia from 2008 to 2014.

Oath of office

coronation oathoathoaths of office
After receiving his or her commission, the Governor-General takes an Oath of Allegiance to the Australian monarch, an Oath of Office, undertaking to serve Australia's monarch "according to law, in the office of Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia", and issues a proclamation assuming office.
All members of the Australian Parliament are required to take before taking their seat in Parliament an Oath or Affirmation of Allegiance before the Governor-General of Australia.

John Baird, 1st Viscount Stonehaven

Lord StonehavenJohn BairdJohn Baird, Baron Stonehaven
In 1925, under Prime Minister Stanley Bruce, the same practice was followed for the appointment of Forster's successor Lord Stonehaven, with the Australian government publicly stating that his name "had been submitted, with others, to the Commonwealth ministry, who had selected him".
John Lawrence Baird of Urie, 1st Viscount Stonehaven, 1st Baron Stonehaven, 2nd Baronet, 3rd of Ury, (27 April 1874 – 20 August 1941) was a British politician who served as the eighth Governor-General of Australia, in office from 1925 to 1930.

Chief Justice of Australia

Chief JusticeCJChief Justice of the High Court of Australia
The oaths are usually taken in a ceremony on the floor of the Senate and are administered by the Chief Justice of Australia in the presence of the Prime Minister of Australia, the Speaker of the Australian House of Representatives, and the President of the Australian Senate.
All Justices, including the Chief Justice, are appointed by the Governor-General of Australia, on the advice of the federal government.

The Honourable

Hon.HonourableThe Hon.
Governors-General have during their tenure the style His/Her Excellency the Honourable and their spouses have the style His/Her Excellency.
In May 2013, the style was given approval by the Queen to be granted to the Governor-General of Australia, both retrospectively and for current and future holders of the office, to be used in the form "His/Her Excellency the Honourable" while holding office and as "the Honourable" in retirement.

Oath of Allegiance (Australia)

Oath of Allegianceoaths of allegiance
After receiving his or her commission, the Governor-General takes an Oath of Allegiance to the Australian monarch, an Oath of Office, undertaking to serve Australia's monarch "according to law, in the office of Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia", and issues a proclamation assuming office.
All members of the Australian Parliament are required to make, before taking their seat in Parliament, an oath or affirmation of allegiance before the Governor-General of Australia.

Order of Australia

AMOAMAO
From the creation of the Order of Australia in 1975, the Governor-General was, ex officio, Chancellor and Principal Companion of the Order, and therefore became entitled to the post-nominal AC.
The Queen of Australia is sovereign head of the order, while the Governor-General of Australia is the principal companion/dame/knight (as relevant at the time) and chancellor of the order.

Chancellor of the Order of Australia

Chancellor and Principal Companion
From the creation of the Order of Australia in 1975, the Governor-General was, ex officio, Chancellor and Principal Companion of the Order, and therefore became entitled to the post-nominal AC.
The position is held by the person who occupies the office of Governor-General of Australia.

Australian peers and baronets

Australian baronetsAustralian peersAustralian dukes and duchesses
The same individuals were also usually either peers, knights, or both (the only Australian peer to be appointed as Governor-General was the Lord Casey; and Sir William McKell was knighted only in 1951, some years into his term, but he was entitled to the style "The Honourable" during his tenure as Premier of New South Wales, an office he held until almost immediately before his appointment).
Many peers served as governors of the Australian colonies (states following Federation), and in the days when the practice of appointing British governors-general was current, the great majority were peers.

Elizabeth II

Queen Elizabeth IIthe QueenQueen
The Governor-General of the Commonwealth of Australia is the representative of the Australian monarch, currently Queen Elizabeth II.
A year later, at the height of the 1975 Australian constitutional crisis, the Australian Prime Minister, Gough Whitlam, was dismissed from his post by Governor-General Sir John Kerr, after the Opposition-controlled Senate rejected Whitlam's budget proposals.

Australia

AUSAustralianCommonwealth of Australia
As the Queen is concurrently the monarch of 15 other Commonwealth realms, and resides in the United Kingdom, she, on the advice of her prime minister, appoints a governor-general to carry out constitutional duties within the Commonwealth of Australia.
Elizabeth II reigns as Queen of Australia and is represented in Australia by the governor-general at the federal level and by the governors at the state level, who by convention act on the advice of her ministers.

Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester

Duke of GloucesterPrince HenryThe Duke of Gloucester
Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester, was a senior member of the Royal family.
He served as Governor-General of Australia from 1945 to 1947, the only member of the British royal family to hold the post.

John Hope, 7th Earl of Hopetoun

Lord HopetounJohn Hope, 1st Marquess of LinlithgowThe Earl of Hopetoun
Various Governors-General had previously served as governors of an Australian state or colony: Lord Hopetoun (Victoria 1889–1895); Lord Tennyson (South Australia 1899–1902); Lord Gowrie (South Australia 1928–34; and New South Wales 1935–1936); Major General Michael Jeffery (Western Australia 1993–2000); Dame Quentin Bryce (Queensland 2003–2008); General David Hurley (New South Wales 2014 - 2019).
John Adrian Louis Hope, 1st Marquess of Linlithgow, 7th Earl of Hopetoun, (25 September 1860 – 29 February 1908) was a British aristocrat and statesman who served as the first Governor-General of Australia, in office from 1901 to 1902.

Westminster system

WestminsterWestminster-styleWestminster parliamentary system
In general, the governor-general observes the conventions of the Westminster system and responsible government, maintaining a political neutrality, and has almost always acted only on the advice of the prime minister or other ministers or, in certain cases, parliament.
A government that is unable to obtain supply can be dismissed by the Governor-General: however, this is generally considered a last resort and is a highly controversial decision to take, given the conflict between the traditional concept of confidence as derived from the lower house and the ability of the Senate to block supply.

Ninian Stephen

Sir Ninian StephenStephen The Right Honourable '''Sir Ninian Martin Stephen
Since then, all but one of the governors-general have been Australian-born; the exception, Sir Ninian Stephen, arrived in Australia as a teenager.
In March 1982, Prime Minister Malcolm Fraser announced that Stephen would succeed Sir Zelman Cowen as Governor-General of Australia.

Michael Jeffery

Major General Michael JefferyJefferyGovernor-General Jeffery
Various Governors-General had previously served as governors of an Australian state or colony: Lord Hopetoun (Victoria 1889–1895); Lord Tennyson (South Australia 1899–1902); Lord Gowrie (South Australia 1928–34; and New South Wales 1935–1936); Major General Michael Jeffery (Western Australia 1993–2000); Dame Quentin Bryce (Queensland 2003–2008); General David Hurley (New South Wales 2014 - 2019).
Major General Philip Michael Jeffery, (born 12 December 1937) is a retired senior Australian Army officer who was the 24th Governor-General of Australia, serving from 2003 to 2008, and the 28th Governor of Western Australia, serving from 1993 to 2000.

Stanley Bruce

BruceStanley Melbourne BruceBruce Government
In 1925, under Prime Minister Stanley Bruce, the same practice was followed for the appointment of Forster's successor Lord Stonehaven, with the Australian government publicly stating that his name "had been submitted, with others, to the Commonwealth ministry, who had selected him".
Rather than risk being defeated in the legislature, which might have resulted in the Governor-General asking Labor to form government, Hughes surprised his colleagues by announcing his intention to resign on 2 February.