Governor-General of New Zealand

Governor-GeneralGovernorGovernor of New ZealandGovernor GeneralGovernor General of New ZealandGovernors-GeneralviceregalGovernor-General and Commander-in-ChiefLieutenant-GovernorLieutenant-Governor of New Zealand
The Governor-General of New Zealand (Te Kāwana Tianara o Aotearoa) is the viceregal representative of the monarch of New Zealand, currently Queen Elizabeth II. As the Queen is concurrently the monarch of 15 other Commonwealth realms, and lives in the United Kingdom (as her principal residence), she, on the advice of her New Zealand prime minister, appoints a governor-general to carry out her constitutional and ceremonial duties within the Realm of New Zealand.wikipedia
1,166 Related Articles

Executive Council of New Zealand

Executive CouncilMember of Executive CouncilExecutive Council in New Zealand
Constitutional functions of the governor-general include presiding over the Executive Council, appointing ministers and judges, granting royal assent to legislation, and summoning and dissolving parliament. Before the governor-general enters office, his or her commission of appointment is publicly read in the presence of the chief justice and the members of the Executive Council.
The Executive Council of New Zealand is the full group of "responsible advisers" to the governor-general of New Zealand on state and constitutional affairs.

New Zealand Parliament

ParliamentParliament of New ZealandHouse of Representatives
Constitutional functions of the governor-general include presiding over the Executive Council, appointing ministers and judges, granting royal assent to legislation, and summoning and dissolving parliament. Although the governor-general's powers are in theory extensive, they are in practice very limited; most political power is exercised by the New Zealand Parliament (which is composed of the Governor-General-in-Parliament and the House of Representatives), through the prime minister and Cabinet.
The Queen is usually represented by her governor-general.

Government House, Wellington

Government HouseGovernment House in WellingtonGovernment House in central Wellington
The governor-general also has an important ceremonial role: hosting events at Government House in Wellington, and travelling throughout New Zealand to open conferences, attend services and commemorations and generally provide encouragement to individuals and groups who are contributing to their communities.
Government House, Wellington, is the principal residence of the Governor-General of New Zealand, the representative of the New Zealand head of state, Queen Elizabeth II.

Monarchy of New Zealand

Queen of New ZealandMonarchKing of the British Dominions Beyond the Seas
The Governor-General of New Zealand (Te Kāwana Tianara o Aotearoa) is the viceregal representative of the monarch of New Zealand, currently Queen Elizabeth II.
Since the monarch resides in the United Kingdom, most of the royal constitutional and ceremonial duties within the Realm of New Zealand are typically carried out by a viceregal representative, the governor-general of New Zealand.

Patsy Reddy

Dame Patsy ReddyDame Patricia ReddyDame Patsey Reddy
The current Governor-General is Dame Patsy Reddy, who has served since 28 September 2016; Prime Minister John Key recommended her to succeed Sir Jerry Mateparae.
Dame Patricia Lee Reddy, (born 17 May 1954) is a New Zealand lawyer and businesswoman serving as the 21st and current Governor-General of New Zealand, in office since 2016.

Ministers of the New Zealand Government

ministersministerCabinet minister
Constitutional functions of the governor-general include presiding over the Executive Council, appointing ministers and judges, granting royal assent to legislation, and summoning and dissolving parliament.
This includes formulating and implementing policies and advising the governor-general.

Letters Patent Constituting the Office of Governor-General of New Zealand

Letters Patent 1983Letters Patentletters patent constituting the office of governor-general
The modern "governor-general" and his or her functions came into being in 1917 and the office is currently mandated by Letters Patent issued in 1983, constituting "the Governor-General and Commander-in-Chief of the Realm of New Zealand".
The letters patent—essentially an open letter from the monarch (in this case, Queen Elizabeth II) that is a legal instrument—constitutes the office of governor-general as the monarch's representative in the Realm of New Zealand, vests executive authority in the governor-general, establishes the Executive Council to advise the governor-general, and makes provision for the exercise of the governor-general's powers should the office be vacant.

Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (New Zealand)

Department of the Prime Minister and CabinetPrime Minister's DepartmentDepartment of Prime Minister and Cabinet
Administrative support for the governor-general is provided by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet.
The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (DPMC) (Te Tari o te Pirimia me te Rūnanga Kāwanatanga) is the central public service department of New Zealand charged with providing support and advice to the Governor-General, the Prime Minister and members of the Cabinet of New Zealand.

Realm of New Zealand

New Zealandrealmassociated states of New Zealand
As the Queen is concurrently the monarch of 15 other Commonwealth realms, and lives in the United Kingdom (as her principal residence), she, on the advice of her New Zealand prime minister, appoints a governor-general to carry out her constitutional and ceremonial duties within the Realm of New Zealand.
The governor-general of New Zealand represents the monarch throughout the Realm of New Zealand, though the Cook Islands have an additional Queen's Representative.

Seal of New Zealand

Seal of New Zealand Act 1977
The New Zealand monarch appoints the governor-general by commission issued under the Seal of New Zealand, known as the "Terms of Appointment".
The governor-general of New Zealand has custody of the Seal, for all official instruments of Her Majesty's Government in New Zealand.

Silvia Cartwright

Dame Silvia CartwrightSilvia Rose CartwrightCartwright J
For instance, Dame Silvia Cartwright would have been in office for five years on 4 April 2006, but her term as governor-general was extended by four months as Prime Minister Helen Clark deemed that "the selection and appointment process [of a new governor-general] [should] not coincide with the pre-election period".
Dame Silvia Rose Cartwright, (née Poulter, born 7 November 1943) is a New Zealand jurist who served as the 18th Governor-General of New Zealand, from 2001 to 2006.

George Grey

Sir George GreyGovernor GreyGrey
When first drafted by then Governor George Grey, the New Zealand Constitution Act 1852 contained a provision for the governor to be elected by New Zealand's Parliament. Three 19th-century New Zealand governors were recalled from office: William Hobson (who died before he was officially recalled), Robert FitzRoy, and Sir George Grey.
He served in a succession of governing positions: Governor of South Australia, twice Governor of New Zealand, Governor of Cape Colony, and the 11th Premier of New Zealand.

William Hobson

Governor HobsonCaptain William HobsonHobson
Three 19th-century New Zealand governors were recalled from office: William Hobson (who died before he was officially recalled), Robert FitzRoy, and Sir George Grey.
Captain William Hobson (26 September 1792 – 10 September 1842) was a British Royal Navy officer who served as the first Governor of New Zealand.

Colonial Secretary of New Zealand

Colonial SecretaryColonial Secretary (New Zealand)Colonial Secretary for New Zealand
Prior to the granting of responsible government in 1856, the colonial secretary acted as administrator when a governor was absent.
Along with the Chief Justice, the office was one of the first four created by Governor William Hobson when he arrived in New Zealand in January 1840.

New Zealand House of Representatives

House of RepresentativesParliamentMP
Although the governor-general's powers are in theory extensive, they are in practice very limited; most political power is exercised by the New Zealand Parliament (which is composed of the Governor-General-in-Parliament and the House of Representatives), through the prime minister and Cabinet.
The New Zealand House of Representatives is a component of the New Zealand Parliament, along with the Sovereign (represented by the Governor-General).

Robert FitzRoy

FitzRoyCaptain FitzRoyGovernor FitzRoy
Three 19th-century New Zealand governors were recalled from office: William Hobson (who died before he was officially recalled), Robert FitzRoy, and Sir George Grey.
As Governor of New Zealand, serving from 1843 to 1845, he tried to protect the Māori from illegal land sales claimed by British settlers.

Governor-General Act 2010

With the introduction of the Governor-General Act 2010, Green MP Keith Locke suggested Parliament recommend the next governor-general's appointment to the Queen, with a recommendation endorsed by three-quarters of parliament.
It reformed the Governor-General of New Zealand's financial programme.

Robert Muldoon

Rob MuldoonMuldoonSir Robert Muldoon
The Leader of the Opposition, Bill Rowling, complained he had not been consulted by Prime Minister Robert Muldoon on the appointment of Holyoake, and openly suggested that he would have recommended Sir Edmund Hillary instead.
One of Muldoon's first actions was to issue a press release stating that he would advise the Governor-General to abolish Labour's superannuation scheme without new legislation.

1856 Sewell Ministry

Sewell MinistryResponsible Government7 May 1856
Prior to the granting of responsible government in 1856, the colonial secretary acted as administrator when a governor was absent.
Sir George Grey, the 3rd Governor of New Zealand, greatly influenced the New Zealand Constitution Act 1852 (UK).

Cabinet of New Zealand

Cabinetcabinet ministerNew Zealand Cabinet
Although the governor-general's powers are in theory extensive, they are in practice very limited; most political power is exercised by the New Zealand Parliament (which is composed of the Governor-General-in-Parliament and the House of Representatives), through the prime minister and Cabinet.
All ministers in Cabinet also serve as members of the Executive Council, the body tasked with advising the governor-general in the exercise of his or her formal constitutional functions.

Jerry Mateparae

Sir Jerry MateparaeJeremiah MateparaeJanine Elizabeth, Lady Mateparae
The current Governor-General is Dame Patsy Reddy, who has served since 28 September 2016; Prime Minister John Key recommended her to succeed Sir Jerry Mateparae.
On 8 March 2011, Prime Minister John Key announced the recommendation of Mateparae as the next Governor-General of New Zealand.

Helen Clark

ClarkClark, HelenHelen Elizabeth Clark
For instance, Dame Silvia Cartwright would have been in office for five years on 4 April 2006, but her term as governor-general was extended by four months as Prime Minister Helen Clark deemed that "the selection and appointment process [of a new governor-general] [should] not coincide with the pre-election period". In 2004, National MP Richard Worth, an avowed monarchist, asked the Prime Minister, Helen Clark, whether she had considered nominating the Earl of Wessex to be the next governor-general.
During her period in office, women held a number of prominent elected and appointed offices in New Zealand, such as the Governor-General, Speaker of the House of Representatives and Chief Justice—these major offices of state were simultaneously occupied by women between March 2005 and August 2006.

Chief Justice of New Zealand

Chief Justicechief justices
Before the governor-general enters office, his or her commission of appointment is publicly read in the presence of the chief justice and the members of the Executive Council.
They also act in place of the governor-general if one has not been appointed or if the appointee is unable to perform his or her duties.

Constitution Act 1986

Constitution Act1986New Zealand Constitution Act 1986
The Constitution Act 1986 provides that "the Governor-General appointed by the Sovereign is the Sovereign's representative in New Zealand".
It outlines the roles and duties of the Monarch, Governor-General, ministers and judges.

New Zealand Legislative Council

Legislative CouncilMLCLegislative Council Chamber
The new parliamentary session is marked by the opening of parliament, during which the governor-general delivers the 'Speech from the Throne' in the Legislative Council Chamber, outlining the Government's legislative agenda.
Unlike the elected lower house, the House of Representatives, the Legislative Council was wholly appointed by the governor-general.